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6

Please, do the things properly : for servers in /data/field/*; do string=$(cut -d" " -f3- /data/field/$servers/time) echo "$string" done backticks are deprecated in 2014 in favor of the form $( ) don't parse ls output, use glob instead like I do with data/field/* Check http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ for various subjects


3

Well, you can follow the hints below: read lines one by one using fgets(). check for the presence of the substring "DCA" using strstr(). Then, if found, continue fgets() and from next iteration, use printf() to print the output. if not found, continue to fgets(). Note: while using fgets(), you need to take care of the possible \n at the end ...


3

Use -d option to set the delimtier to space $ echo 00:00 down server | cut -d" " -f3- server Note Use the field number 3 as the count starts from 1 and not 0 From man page -d, --delimiter=DELIM use DELIM instead of TAB for field delimiter N- from N'th byte, character or field, to end of line More Tests $ echo 00:00 down ...


2

You can use sed as well: sed 's/^.* * //'


2

As I understand your question, you would like to overwrite previous prints and count up. See this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/5419488/4362607 I edited the answer according to PM 2Ring's suggestions. Thanks! import sys import time def counter(): for x in range(10): print '{0}\r'.format(x), sys.stdout.flush() time.sleep(1) ...


2

Because 1 is a char array, while the second is an array of arrays as "a" is in fact an array of 2 chars 'a' and '\0'


2

You have an extra } before END that makes you code fail (give error), remove it. The BEGIN section does not do anything, since $1,$2 etc do not contain nothing before first line is run. Rewriting your code some, makes it more easy to read. Since gen does not contain anything in first run, you if goes to the else section. The first thing it does there is to ...


2

As @Jotne points out, you misunderstand the use of BEGIN - it is executed before the first input file is opened for reading and so $0, $1, etc. ar not populated in that section. Try this instead: $ cat tst.awk BEGIN{ OFS="\t" } { if ($5 == gen) { fin = $3 } else { prtGen() ch = $1 ini = $2 gen = $5 } ...


1

There is no standard function for this, but you can easily create your own array/string mapping them. Or you could simply add a constant to map them into the unicode range for pictorial representations of the ASCII control characters.


1

This is a job for regular expressions: import re from cStringIO import StringIO def extractAmount(file_like): amountRe = re.compile('^.* Management\.Handle - Action: Amount=(\d+),(\d+);') for line in file_like: result = amountRe.match(line) if result: matches = result.groups() yield (float(matches[0]) + ...


1

Your print() function is recursive. It will go down the tree until it'll find a null leaf and print that message. Then it will print the rest. I propose following change: void print(Node * pp) { if(pp==NULL) { cout<<"Node sent to print is null"<<endl; return;} if (pp->left) print(pp->left); ...


1

arr is a vector of char of 10 elements, and arr2 is a vector of chars pointers of 10 elements char arr2[10] = {'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j'}; It is equal arr.


1

To understand this behavior, you have to know the difference between strings and chars. The former are created with " and can contain several chars, while the latter are created with ' and represent only one char. Since you used " in your array initialisation, you created an array of strings, not chars. Now strings are represented via pointers to chars. ...


1

In the first one you are just declaring a string, but in the second one you are creating 10 pointers to 10 strings. As an example char* arr2_0 = "a" ; char* arr2_1 = "b" ; char* arr2_2 = "c" ; char* arr2_3 = "d" ; char* arr2_4 = "e" ; char* arr2_5 = "f" ; char* arr2_6 = "g" ; char* arr2_7 = "h" ; char* arr2_8 = "i" ; char* arr2_9 = "j" ;


1

Either use a debugger (like in Eclipse) or set some System.out lines to verify, but it seems the arraylist is empty and not entering the while-loop.


1

As was stated by Matthew Watson in comments, this is a Windows 8 driver issue. Our office has network printers installed using Windows drivers on each computer. I installed the drivers for the specific printer and the blurring was fixed. This is unfortunate, however, since Windows 7 printer drivers work. We will have to inform customers not to use Windows 8 ...


1

Here's a more flexible version for debugging/verbose use in Rscript. Not only it prints to stderr as you ask, but it also allows you to pass variable number of arguments, types etc, like printf does. v <- function(...) cat(sprintf(...), sep='', file=stderr()) Now one can do things like: v("name: %s age: %d\n", name, age) etc.



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