Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Efficiency is a tricky thing. In real-world applications, it's often a good idea to use the simplest and easiest algorithm, and only start to optimize when that's measurably slow. And then you optimize by doing profiling to figure out where the code is slow. If you are using CPython, it gets especially tricky, as even an inefficient algorithm implemented in ...


1

I seemed to figure it out. After the while loop I had to add another condition because it was passing straight to the else. so it should be like this. if(curr.getNext() != null) { System.out.println("6"); elem.setNext(prev.getNext()); prev.setNext(elem); } else if(curr.getKey() > elem.getKey()) { elem.setNext(prev.getNext()); ...


2

The problem isn't that it's not picklable in this case - if you're using a Unix-like platform, the queue can be passed to the child without pickling. (On Windows, I think you would get a pickling error here, though). The root problem is that you're not using a process-safe queue. The only queues that can be used between processes are the Queue objects that ...


0

It is difficult to run your code because there is no output. However, I tried a few things: In the heapq module, heap[0] is always designated the smallest item. In your case, 1 is the smallest item. Therefore, changing this value from 1 to 5 should theoretically be easy. I tried heapq.heappop(heap) which should return the smallest value. Thus, as you ...


1

The solution by @enrico works, implementing __eq__ to check whether elements are in the heap, and __cmp__ for prioritizing the elements. However, it will produce some strange side effects. For example, Element('A', 1) will at the same time be == to and < than Element('A', 2). Alternatively, you could just use regular tuples instead of that Element ...


2

Add the method __eq__ in Element so you can check for membership using the keyword in (without __eq__ the code Element('A', 1) == Element('A', 1) would give False): class Element: def __init__(self, key, value): self.key = key self.value = value def __eq__(self, other): return self.key == other.key Heaps are just lists in ...


1

You can modify the comparison method of your Element class to reverse the order: def __cmp__(self, other): return -cmp(self.degree, other.degree) Negating the return of cmp reverses the queue, because __cmp__ returns positive, negative or zero depending on the result of the comparison: cmp(a, b) < 0: a < b cmp(a, b) > 0: a > b cmp(a, b) ...


1

You can just use this method to compare: def __cmp__(self, other): return -cmp(self.degree, other.degree) This will make element1 < element2 if element1.degree > element2.degree


1

But, how can i find the node that contains an element in d*log n? I think that this operation requires O(n) (time to visit the heap) and the operation cost ignores that detail. Am i wrong? For an efficient implementation, you need an auxiliary data structure that stores the map from elements to nodes. Another question is: how can i insert a node as ...


1

The usual way to do this is to make your priority value a tuple of your two priorities. Python sorts tuples lexographically, so it first will compare the first tuple item of each priority, and only if they are equal will the next items be compared. The usual way to make a priority queue in Python is using the heapq module's functions to manipulate a list. ...


3

Starting from Python2.6, you can use Queue.PriorityQueue. Items inserted into the queue are sorted based on their __cmp__ method, so just implement one for the class whose objects are to be inserted into the queue. Note that if your items consist of tuples of objects, you don't need to implement a container class for the tuple, as the built in tuple ...


1

The Standard PHP Library (SPL) implements the SplPriorityQueue class : $pq = new SplPriorityQueue(); // The insert method inserts an element in the queue by shifting it up $pq->insert('A', 3); $pq->insert('B', 6); $pq->insert('C', 1); $pq->insert('D', 2); // Count the elements echo "count ->" . $pq->count() . PHP_EOL; // Sets the mode ...


1

Let us look at the following page occurrence: 1,2,3,2,3,2,3,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1 Let us assume that the 2 pages can be held in memory. According to your algorithm, when 3 will arrive for the first time, 2 will be replaced because number of occurrences of 1 is quite high , which is not optimal. In the optimal page replacement algorithm, the criteria ...


2

In order to change the insertion time to O(1), you can insert elements in to the array unsorted. You can then create a minPeek() method that searches for the smallest key using a linear search and then call that inside the delete/remove method and delete the smallest key. Here is how you can achieve this. public void insert(int item) { ...


0

Also, as per the javadoc, The Iterator provided in method PriorityQueue.iterator() is not guaranteed to traverse the elements of the priority queue in any particular order. If you need ordered traversal, consider using Arrays.sort(pq.toArray()). Hence,The iterator does not return the elements in any particular order.


1

The elements returned by a PriorityQueue's iterator are not ordered using the queue's order. The javadoc says: The Iterator provided in method iterator() is not guaranteed to traverse the elements of the priority queue in any particular order. The only guarantee is that the head of the queue, returned by peek() or poll(), is the smallest of all the ...


0

Implementing a priority queue as a doubly-linked list (or, indeed, implementing one at all) is pretty unusual, since there's an STL implementation available to use: #include <iostream> #include <queue> #include <functional> int main(void) { std::priority_queue<std::string, std::vector<std::string>, ...


0

Without discussing the sense of this construct, i'd suggest it may be a about the way you are using the PriorityQueue. Inside getValueAt you are able to read from the queue using peek, but poll tries to modify it, which seems to be the problem. Is getValueAt in the same class like your private Queue<Entry<Flight,Double>> data? Depending on the ...


0

The problem with a Queue in this case is that it is not designed to be traversed more than once. I suggest switching to a sorted List. I think what is happening is that it is being drawn once which empties the Queue and any subsequent refresh, redraw or redering sees an empty Queue


1

In case you stumble into this question after it's been accepted. RabbitMQ has a plugin that allows to set up one queue with priorites: https://github.com/rabbitmq/rabbitmq-priority-queue


0

Just pop half the values off the PQ. The last one popped is the middle one. The case where N is even is left as an exercise for the reader. Of course this is assuming that by 'middle' you mean 'median'. If you mean 'mean', you're using the wrong data structure: you should use an array, sort it, and evaluate (array[0]+array[last])/2.


2

It makes no difference here because the Star object will be copy constructed either way, what the code should probably be doing is max_heap.emplace(ID, data[0], data[1], data[2]); // Won't work without a Star ctor or max_heap.emplace(std::move(s)); or max_heap.push(std::move(s)); Then again the struct is simple enough that it's likely none of this ...


3

The default comparison is std::less< Star > which will call the operator < you have defined. Template type parameters can have deault arguments, just like function parameters. It's the same with the default container type, which is std::vector< Star >. Actually you can write the declaration simply as priority_queue<Star> max_heap; ...



Top 50 recent answers are included