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Per this SO question it is unnecessary to have a decrease-key method in order to implement Dijkstra's Algorithm. You can simply add an item to the priority queue as many times as necessary and keep track of which nodes you have visited to weed out the duplicates. The first time you actually visit a node by popping it off of the queue, you have found the ...


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To use priority queues on RabbitMQ you need to set the x-max-priority property when declaring your queue: https://www.rabbitmq.com/priority.html


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From http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/PriorityQueue.html An unbounded priority queue based on a priority heap. The elements of the priority queue are ordered according to their natural ordering, or by a Comparator provided at queue construction time for integer, long, float, double, character, boolean (i.e. primitive data types) the ...


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Your question is rather vague on the functionality, but I think the idea is wrong. Someone seems to have the idea of using the database as secondary storage for an in-memory application. That doesn't really make much sense. Normally, you would use a simple file for this. Although you can use a database for managing secondary/tertiary storage, a database ...


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VM in this context refers to a JVM (Java Virtual Machine), the piece of software that executes Java byte code. There are several different implementations for this software (most notable today - Oracle's and the OpenJDK's). Some of these implementations may add some additional memory to arrays for their internal purposes (e.g., tracking garbage collection). ...


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I'd probably use a couple a queuing goroutine. Starting with the data structures in the PriorityQueue example, I'd build a function like this: http://play.golang.org/p/hcNFX8ehBW func queue(in <-chan *Item, out chan<- *Item) { // Make us a queue! pq := make(PriorityQueue, 0) heap.Init(&pq) var currentItem *Item // Our item ...


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One way would be to use sync.Cond: Cond implements a condition variable, a rendezvous point for goroutines waiting for or announcing the occurrence of an event. An example from the package could be amended as follows (for the consumer): c.L.Lock() for heap.Len() == 0 { c.Wait() // Will wait until signalled by pushing routine } item := ...


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Following on Imcphers' answer, this would be a simple implementation in Java. Note that you do not need Comparable because enqueue takes an extra parameter, namely the discrete priority of the newly-added element: public class PQueue<T> { public static final int MAX_PRIORITIES = 10; private ArrayList<ArrayDeque<T> > queues = new ...


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According to what I've been told by some developers, this seems to be a bug in Asterisk's queue application. The queue app doesn't seem to share the longest wait times across the queues, thus, if a member is part of multiple queues, there could be some problems like what we've experienced. I have come to accept that and moved on to a commercial grade Call ...


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As the oracle documentation here states, http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/PriorityQueue.html: A priority queue is unbounded, but has an internal capacity governing the size of an array used to store the elements on the queue. It is always at least as large as the queue size. As elements are added to a priority queue, its capacity grows ...


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You have to implements Comparable interface of your class. The trick is adding a method to get the levelClass (LOW, MEDIUM, HIGH) that is used in the compareTo method. public class MeterReading implements Comparable { public static final int LOW = 0; public static final int MEDIUM = 1; public static final int HIGH = 2; private String name; ...


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If your elements are Ints, the easiest way to define such an Ordering is by taking a negative of the elements which should be ordered in reverse. You can create the Ordering, using methods provided by the object Ordering, and pass it to the PriotityQueue either explicitly: // I'm using the data format, you have provided originally, before the edit val ...


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Each of the arrays will correspond to a different priority. Your lowest level priority array will deal only with objects of that priority level. Your highest level priority array will deal with objects of highest priority level, and so on. When you receive a new object, you place it into the array that corresponds to its priority. It doesn't matter, ...


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Dijkstra's algorithm is based on a priority queue Not necessarily. You can also implement dijkstra's algorithm without a priority queue. But in that case you have to pick the lowest value after searching from your array of node list you are currently processing. Bellman-Ford algorithm is based on a plain FIFO queue Without any sort of queue you ...


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bool CompareByDistance(int indexLeft, int indexRight); takes three arguments: The this-pointer and the both ints. Besides this being the wrong number of arguments for the priority_queue template parameter: What instance of VD do you expect this non-static method to be called on? A workaround for this would be "carrying" the instance with you like this: ...


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Just like the keys of a Map, the elements you put in a PriorityQueue need to be immutable. The element which is inserted in PriorityQueue is compared against all the existing elements in the PriorityQueue. So, if the underlying element changes, your PriorityQueue will most likely fail to hold the invariants. An alternative datastructure which you could use ...


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The standard interfaces do not provide an update capability. You have use a custom type that implements this. This is because, as stated in the S.O post titled, "Updating Java PriorityQueue when its elements change priority": You have to remove and re-insert, as the queue works by putting new elements in the appropriate position when they are inserted. ...


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This SO question should help you. The drawback with the PriorityQueue in Java is that the if an inserted element value changes, the priority queue is not re-constructed to reflect the new order. Thus you would have to remove and re-insert the changing elements to satisfy your use case.


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You can save it as a key-value pair where key is a Job.Id and value is a Job.Priority. This way you don't need to serialize whole Job struct each time.


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Following all the helpful comments and answers I determined that there probably isn't a pre-built solution for this. In order to try and provide a comprehensive answer to the question I have had a go at writing my own implementation using a PriorityBlockingQueue. I posted the code on StackExchange Code Review, you can see the full code and any community ...


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You have heard of Weighted Fair Queues? That is a well developed way to schedule such that a prediction is made about which job should theoretically complete first, and that is the one that is serviced.


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One small detail: if there's any chance your queue could be modified during the loop, then both iterator and for each will cause a ConcurrentModificationException; if there's a chance the queue will get modified during the processing, you could use poll(): Resource resource; while ((resource = resourceQueue.poll()) != null) { ...


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By looking at the source code for java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor it seems to be a real pain to get this working when submitting futures. You have to override protected methods that feels internal and do some nasty casts. I suggest you simply use the execute method instead. There is no wrapping of the Runnable going on there so it should work. If ...


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If you are already familiar with PriorityBlockingQueue, why don't you simply poll it to handle hardware requests? public class HardwareHandler public static final PriorityBlockingQueue<Message> queue = new PriorityBlockingQueue<Message>(); static { while (true) { Message m = queue.take(); ...



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