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15

The general approach is to feed uniformly distributed random numbers from 0..1 interval into the inverse of the cumulative distribution function of your desired distribution. Thus in your case, just draw a random number x from 0..1 (for example with Random.NextDouble()) and based on its value return 1 if 0 <= x < 150/208, 2 if 150/208 <= ...


14

This is actually an interesting problem. I was inspired to write a blog post about it covering in detail fair vs unfair coin tosses all the way to the OP's situation of having a different probability for each coin. You need a technique called dynamic programming to solve this problem in polynomial time. General Problem: Given C, a series of n coins p1 to pn ...


9

For a simple discrete distribution, you can write a sampler that will return your outcomes with the desired frequency by using the cumulative probabilities. Random r = new Random(); double v = r.nextDouble(); if (v <= 0.85) { return 0; } if (v <= 0.86) { return 1; } return 2; This will return the numbers 0, 1 and 2 with a probability of 0.85, 0.01 ...


6

All these are very similar: If you can compute #1 using a function cdf(x), then the solution to #2 is simply 1 - cdf(x), and for #3 it's cdf(x) - cdf(y). Since Python includes the (gauss) error function built in since version 2.7 you can do this by calculating the cdf of the normal distribution using the equation from the article you linked to: import ...


6

From wikipedia iid: "Independent and identically distributed" implies an element in the sequence is independent of the random variables that came before it. In this way, an IID sequence is different from a Markov sequence, where the probability distribution for the nth random variable is a function of the previous random variable in the sequence (for a ...


5

Yes, this is correct. Actually, this task is designed to be a catch. You can safely ignore how much of the population is left-handed, because you are given how accurate the method is. No matter the right/left handed ratio in the population, the "accuracy" of this method is evenly spread across the population.


4

Rayleigh distribution is a special case of the Weibull distribution. If you google around, there are lots of Weibull generators written in Java, for example: http://commons.apache.org/math/apidocs/org/apache/commons/math3/distribution/WeibullDistribution.html http://www.iro.umontreal.ca/~simardr/ssj/doc/html/umontreal/iro/lecuyer/randvar/WeibullGen.html ...


4

You need to think only in terms of uniform distribution over repeated rolls. You can't look over 100 rolls, because forcing that to yield exactly 45 would not be random. Usually, such rolls should exhibit "lack of memory". For example, if you roll a dice looking for a 6, you have a 1-in-6 chance. If you roll it 5 times, and don't get a six - then: the ...


4

install.packages('Rlab') will help


4

In your particular case it is better to get a random value in [0; 100) using uniform distribution and then check what range it falls in: [0; 85), [85;99), [99, 100)


4

Compare your own CRC with 0x1EDC6F41 as your "ideal" reference. Having said that, there is no ideal 32-bit CRC. Different polynomials have different collision characteristics depending on the length of data hashed. However, a paper by Castagnoli in 1993 found what is considered the best 32-bit CRC value over the broadest range of data lengths, which is ...


4

If I'm correct, for k and d positive integers, the convolution integral can be expressed in terms of moments of the standard normal distribution, which are known (see for example here). Let f(r) denote the standard normal pdf, and let h(r) denote the other pdf in your problem, . Expanding the term (1-rd)k-1 with the binomial theorem, g(r) can be expressed ...


3

You can calculate those conditional probabilities using Bayes' Theorem. Let T be a random variable equal to the time (in minutes) when the dishes are washed. I assume by the probability being "linear" (between 0 and 100 minutes) you mean, for any random variate t: P[T <= t] = .01*t, 0 <= t <= 100 If the dishes have not been washed at time t0, ...


3

The issue comes down to probability! If we simplfy the game down to 6 moves: Horse 1 will finish in 6 moves, however horse 6 has 5 attempts to beat it at 1/6 chance each try. The odds of horse 6 NOT finishing = (5/6)^5 = 0.40 Therefore the odds of horse 6 finishing in 5 moves or less is 0.6 If we do this for each of the horses, poor horse 1 never stood ...


3

This can serve as an alternative for future references which can get the probability of precise values such as 99.999% or 0.0001% To get probability(real percentage) do as such: //70% double probability = 0.7; double result = rand() / RAND_MAX; if(result < probability) //do something I have used this method to create very large percolated grids and ...


3

Causality by Judea Pearl is the book to read. The difference is that one is causal and the other is merely statistical. Before dismissing me as a member of the tautology club, hear me through. A directed probabilistic relationship (AKA a complete set of Conditional Probability Tables , AKA Bayesian Network) only contains statistical information. Meaning ...


3

You can call a function which gives you a random number between 0 and 1. If the probabilities are w_1 = 0.2, w_2 = 0.5, w_3 = 0.3, you can: Choose x_1 if you got a number between 0 and 0.2 Choose x_2 if you got a number between 0.2 and 0.7 Choose x_3 otherwise. More generally, choose x_n if w_1 + ... + w_(n-1) <= random number < w_1 + ... + w_(n-1) ...


3

You are basically correct. P(A|B) is the probability of A given B. P(A|B,C) is the probability of A given (B and C). You could just as easily write it as P(A|B^C) but it is notational convention to use a comma. Think of everything after the vertical bar as a list of the given things, separated by commas. (And note that the vertical bar is a very high ...


2

The joint probability for P(M,P,W,B) is simply the product of the entries of the other tables. This is from Wikipedia: X is a Bayesian network with respect to G if its joint probability density function (with respect to a product measure) can be written as a product of the individual density functions, conditional on their parent variables: where pa(v) ...


2

Melkhiah66. You did everything right only change MuestraAUnif<- runif(2) for MuestraAUnif<- runif(32) and it should work


2

On Wikipedia, they have the formula for finding the probability for two alike cards, three of a kind, etc.. I'd use that formula.


2

Off-topic, but I'll bite: How many possible length-N strings are there? How many of them have an even bit-sum? How many of them have an odd bit-sum? To put it another way, assume there are a even length-(N-1) strings, and b odd length-(N-1) strings. To form a length-N string, append either a 0 or 1. This results in a+b even strings, and a+b odd ...


2

No, it's not solvable without an assumption, such as Theta1 and Theta2 being independent. However, that's not what computability means. The problem is that you need a term of the form P(Theta1 and Theta2), but there's no way to get that without knowing how correlated they are.


2

No it doesn't. If you have a finite number of trials then neither A nor complement A will happen an infinite number of times. If you have an infinite number of trials then one or both of A and complement A must occur an infinite number of times. Furthermore if the probability of A remains constant then the only possibilities are: A never occurs, ...


2

The opposite of A occurring infinitely often is not 'not A' occurring infinitely often but 'A' not occurring infinitely often i.e. 'A' occurring only a finite number of times. As Mark pointed out, the meaning of this for not A depends on whether you have a finite number of trials ('occurrences') or not: finite number of trials: also not A can ...


2

Do this only once: Write a function that calculates a cdf array given a pdf array. In your example pdf array is [150,40,15,3], cdf array will be [150,190,205,208]. Do this every time: Get a random number in [0,1) , multiply with 208, truncate up (or down: I leave it to you to think about the corner cases) You'll have an integer in 1..208. Name it r. ...


2

This question explains the various approaches for generating random numbers with different probabilities. According to this article, shown on that question, the best such approach (in terms of time complexity) is the so-called "alias method" by Michael Vose. For your convenience, I have written and provide here a C# implementation of a random number ...


2

Just use mean(sample(:)) and var(sample(:)) where sample is an array of numbers. The (:) part is used to turn the array sample into a vector. You can omit that if sample is already a vector. Note that this computes the sample mean and sample variance of your data (not the true mean and variance of the distribution).


2

P(A|B) == "probability that A occurs given that B occurred" P(B|A) == "probability that B occurs given that A occurred" P(A) == "prior"; this expresses your knowledge about event A going in. P(B|A) == "posterior"; what you learn during the trial. P(B) == "normalizing factor" Bayes theorem is the scientific method: Come in with some knowledge, get some ...



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