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To make a n by m matrix in numpy, you can multiply two arrays of appropriate shape. If array x is n by 1 and array y is 1 by m, their product x * y will be n by m. Here's an example of how you can go about this with data that is initially one dimensional (I'm using random values, which should really be normalized if it's a probability distribution, but for ...


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In case anyone else is looking to figure out the standard deviation when you know X% of the population is within Y units of the mean, I think I figured it out with Java. Commons Math has a nice library for error functions so I used that. SD = Math.sqrt(2) * Erf.erfcInv(1 - p) where 0 <= p <= 1 So that will give you the standard deviation for Y ...


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From the breeze source. case class Binomial(n: Int, p: Double)(implicit rand: RandBasis=Rand) extends DiscreteDistr[Int] with Moments[Double, Double] { require(n > 0, "n must be positive!"); require(p >= 0.0, "p must be non-negative!"); def probabilityOf(k: Int) = exp(logProbabilityOf(k)); override def toString() = "Binomial(" + n + ", " + p ...


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Given your probability mass function, you can compute the cumulative mass function as follows. // Probability mass function pmf = [0.1, 0.3, 0.2, 0.1, 0.3] // Cumulative mass function cmf = [0, 0, 0, 0, 0] cmf[0] = pmf[0] for i = 1, 2, 3, 4 cmf[i] = cmf[i - 1] + pmf[i] Now simply plot your cumulative mass function instead of your probability mass ...


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As you have already noticed, the difference is due to the different mapping of the labels. LIBSVM uses its own labels internally and therefore needs a mapping between the internal labels and the labels you provided. The labels in this mapping are generated using the order the labels appear in the training data. So if the label of the first element in your ...


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I recommend following the PyMC user's guide. It explicitly shows you how to specify your model (including priors). With MCMC, you end up getting marginals of all posterior values, so you don't need to know how to marginalize over priors. The Dirichlet is often used as a prior to multinomial probabilities in Bayesian models. The values of the Dirichlet ...


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Function for similarity calculation between A and B function SIM = SIMcalc(A,B) %// Get joint unique events for A and B unq_events = unique([A(:,1);B(:,1)]).'; %//' %// Presence of events across joint unique events event_tagA = bsxfun(@eq,A(:,1),unq_events); event_tagB = bsxfun(@eq,B(:,1),unq_events); %// Probabilities corresponding to each joint event ...


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Have you considered forming a complete probability histogram of the 5 events? Let's say: Ah=[0.6 0 0 0.1 0.3]; Bh=[0.5 0.1 0.4 0 0]; Ch=[0 0.9 0 0.1 0]; Dh=[0.6 0 0 0.1 0.3]; Then you could compare them as vectors, concatenating them in a matrix and using pdist: m=[Ah; Bh; Ch; Dh]; sim=squareform(pdist(m,'cityblock'));


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OK so you choose a function that takes in two matrices and outputs a scalar, that way you can just use bsxfun: similarity = @(x,y)(mean(mean(x./y))); M = cat(3,B,C,D); %//Combine into a single 3D matrix squeeze(sum(mean(bsxfun(similarity, A, M),2))) Note that my similarity function I used is probably not the best for your data since it returns Inf if the ...


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here's my stab at answering your questions: good learning resource: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PageRank#Simplified_algorithm (no doubt you've see it already, but it's a pretty good one). Start there, understand the algorithm first, then do the implementation. this might be a good simple method to implement? ...


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Based on your comment, I will make the following suggestion. If you need to do this as an SVM (and because, as you say, you get better performance when you do it this way), take the output from your intermediate classifiers and feed them as features to your final classifier. Even better, switch to a multi-layer Neural Net where your inputs represent inputs ...


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The reason why the naive solution doesn't work is that it gives a higher probability density to the points closer to the circle center. In other words the circle that has radius r/2 has probability r/2 of getting a point selected in it, but it has area (number of points) pi*r^2/4. Therefore we want a radius probability density to have the following ...


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The easiest way to get this is using pbetanorm(...) in the VGAM package. Documentation here. library(fitdistrplus) library(VGAM) set.seed(1) # for reproducible example X <- rbetanorm(1000,2,6) params <- fitdist(X,distr=dbetanorm,start=list(shape1=1,shape2=1), fix.arg=list(mean=0,sd=1)) params # Fitting of the distribution ' ...


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If you want a linear drop-off what you're describing is called a triangle (or triangular) distribution. Given U, a source of uniformly distributed random numbers on the range [0,1), you can generate a triangle on the range [a,b) with its mode at a using: def triangle(a,b) return a + (b-a)*(1 - sqrt(U)) end This can be derived by writing the equation ...


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You may create class abstract class IntervalAction: public abstract class IntervalAction { private final double minBound; private final double maxBound; public IntervalAction(double minBound, double maxBound) { if (minBound < 0) throw new IllegalArgumentException("minBound >= 0"); if (maxBound > 1) throw new ...


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I think it's clear. If you want shorter, double chance = random.nextDouble(); if ((chance -= 0.4) < 0) { a(); } else if ((chance -= 0.2) < 0) { b(); } else if ((chance -= 0.2) < 0) { c(); } else { d(); } (I assume you wanted else if.)


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You could make a new variable storing aProb + bProb as that is used in every if statement except the first one, which would make it shorter.


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If you don't know the underlaying distribution, maybe the function ksdensity (Statistics Toolbox required) is useful: x = [randn(3000,1); 15+randn(3000,1)]; figure; hist(x,40) [f,xi] = ksdensity(x); figure; plot(xi,f);


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You have to normalize so that the total probabilities sum to one. Typically that means summing over the histogram or integrating if the function is continuous, then dividing.


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Algorithm described in @Ushman's, @Brent's and @kaushaya's answers is implemented in Apache commons-math library. Take a look at EnumeratedDistribution class (groovy code follows): def probabilities = [ new Pair<String, Double>("one", 25), new Pair<String, Double>("two", 30), new Pair<String, Double>("three", 45)] def ...


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MAP simply returns a posterior mode, while the NormalApproximation uses a quadratic Taylor series approximation to the posterior, and so can return both the expected value and the covariance matrix. Of course, it uses a normal distribution to approximate the posterior, which may not be appropriate.


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You might want to look at randsample nodeSource = randsample(1:numel(P), numel(P), true, P)


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Here is my solution to the MontyHall problem implemented in python. This solution makes use of numpy for speed, it also allows you to change the number of doors. def montyhall(Trials:"Number of trials",Doors:"Amount of doors",P:"Output debug"): N = Trials # the amount of trial DoorSize = Doors+1 Answer = (nprand.randint(1,DoorSize,N)) ...


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Fere Res check the following suggestion here. Firstly you have to calculate the lda model from all users and then vwith the use of the extracted vector of the unknown doc, which is, calculated here vec_bow = dictionary.doc2bow(doc.lower().split()) and then vec_lda = lda[vec_bow] If you print the following : print(vec_lda) you ll get the distribution of ...


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Your problem (at least the one in the question) is right in the line ++frequency[(rollDice()*diceNumber)]; Instead of rolling n dice and summing them, you're rolling 1 die and multiplying it by n. You would want to have something like int sum = 0; for(int i = 0;i<diceNumber;i++) sum+=rollDice(); ++frequency[sum]; That will more accurately ...


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You could reduce it to one line this way: randDiscreteDistribution = diff([0; sort(rand(sizeOfDistribution-1, 1)); 1]); Instead of normalizing to 1 by dividing, this takes sizeOfDistribution-1 points in the unit interval and then uses the lenghts of the obtained subintervals as the distribution values. Those lengths are automatically normalized. With ...


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After a lot of searching on the Internet and stackoverflow, I found Dr. Math explains it well in a working function (a link in another answer has an incorrect formula). I converted Dr. Math's formula to C# and my nUnit tests (which had been failing before with other attempts at the code) all passed. First I had to write a few helper functions: public ...


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First question: If the distance between the separating hyperplane and a vector is very large, we can have a high degree of confidence that it was correctly classified, thus the probability estimate will be high. In contrary, if you have a vector very close to your hyperplane separating two classes, its probability estimate will be close to 0.5 for each ...


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Since 1.7 it's better to use (in concurrent environment at least): ThreadLocalRandom.current().nextInt(25) == 0 Javadoc A random number generator isolated to the current thread. Like the global Random generator used by the Math class, a ThreadLocalRandom is initialized with an internally generated seed that may not otherwise be modified. When applicable, ...



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