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Arrange for the child to communicate with the parent to indicate completion. A shared event would be one way. If the process terminates and the parent has not received notification of success then it can conclude that the child failed. Another option might be to use the process exit code. Will be zero on success, assuming the child follows the usual ...


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Your error checking is broken. Success is indicated by OpenProcess returning a non-zero value. The error code is only meaningful if OpenProcess fails, that is if OpenProcess returns zero. So, you must only ask for the error code when the function call fails, as indicated by its return value. You check the error code without checking the return value, which ...


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You need to use the double slash in your Verbatim strings p.Start("powershell", "-ExecutionPolicy ByPass -windowstyle hidden -file .\\scripts\\Excel.ps1"); The other option is to use the @ symbol before it. For the second error: The error message says that: Member Process.Start(string, string) cannot be accessed with an instance reference; qualify it ...


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If all memory in a system is a stack of paper. And each process is a little boy or girl who has it's own pile from the stack of papers on which to do their artwork. These are your applications. Now if some of these applications are threaded, think of it like being two little girls or boys working together with the same pile of papers. They are both ...


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Why the parent process only get the 8 bits of the child process's exit status? Because POSIX says so. And POSIX says so because that's how original Unix worked, and many operating system derived from it and modeled after it continue to work. What about return value of normal functions? They are unrelated. Return whatever is reasonable. -1 is as ...


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Works fine :S The only other way to get the TEB of a thread is to read it using: NT_TIB* tib = (NT_TIB*)__readfsdword(0x18); and read the base address from that. Your calls may be failing because you might not have the right permissions to read the memory. Try using VirtualProtect? The below works but I've only tested it on the current process.. ...


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Sadly, this does not work. We cannot attach an object or function to node's process.env Global object because all entries added to process.env are type-cast to String. If you're interested in how we ended up solving this problem see: https://github.com/nelsonic/redis-connection


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In the specific context of Java, a single invocation of Java, starting one JVM (Java Virtual Machine), is one process; code in the JVM has access to memory in that JVM, but not in other JVMs. Within each JVM there can be multiple threads. These threads share one memory space in the sense that they can access objects created by other threads in that same ...


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There are couple of good answers already. Some details : Each process is given a virtual memory addresses with a range of 2 power word size ( 10 years ago it would have been 2 power 32 ( for 32 bit machines)). The process can uses these addresses as if it was physical memory. In the background the OS does a lot of swapping/paging/translation etc., from ...


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memory space is like a boundary. An isolation to not to overstep, overwrite each other hence processes cannot access each other's variable etc.,hence have to use IPC to communicate to each other. But threads can access global variables (typically use some kind of protection like mutex when reading writing ). Assume ( T = Thread, P = Process, and V = ...


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Assuming you want to continue to execute it against the cmd prompt, you can do: var psi = new ProcessStartInfo("cmd", "/c " + cmd); // note the /c psi.UseShellExecute = false; psi.CreateNoWindow = true; psi.RedirectStandardOutput = true; Process.Start(psi); /c directs the prompt to "execute the following string". However, a cleaner method may be to ...


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It can be done by populating cluster.settings object with uid property. In my case it looks like this: cluster.settings.uid = 10000; where 10000 is my uid To get your uid on Linux, run: id -u <your-user-name-here> or simply: id


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If you're interested in the percentage, you're out of luck - that isn't done by standard output. Standard output only handles streams of data, while the percentage output is actually done by manipulating the console directly. It's not part of the output stream - there is no way to replicate the same effect using the standard I/O streams. So it's not a ...



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