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3

Here is a description of unix sockets and an example in code. You need to designate one of the forked processes as server, and the other as client. In the server, you have to wait for connections. In the client, you have to establish the communication. In the link are examples of each service. Don't be alarmed by the length of the code - most of it is ...


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You need to add a function, called a "signal handler". It has a very specific type. Then you need to change your code to "install the signal handler". It's probably best to do this with teh sigaction(2) system call. So, something like this: #include <signal.h> void sighandler(int, siginfo_t *, void *); ... oid sighandler(int signo, siginfo_t *si, ...


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Node itself will not exit if there is a valid/active reference to a socket. Under the hood, http.createServer() is (eventually) calling server.listen() Calling server.listen() will keep the process from exiting as long as the server isn't unreferenced. server.listen() creates a socket. Note from the docs for socket.ref(): Opposite of unref, calling ...


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Because you can't "start a WMV file". In your scenario you rely on the OS file extension handler mappings to invoke a default application to handle it. UPDATE From the MSDN docs: Use this overload to start a process resource by specifying its file name. The overload associates the resource with a new Process component. If the process is already ...


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In Task Manager, in the Applications tab, if you right-click on Eclipse and select Go To Process it will show you what process belongs to Eclipse. Which is javaw.exe


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You could add your own Crash Handler in your project. To give you an idea this is an example of custom Crash Handler you could modify for your purpose.


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Each time you call Start() on the Process instance, a new process is created and system allocates resources for it. Such resources are process handle and other attributes like exit code and exit time. If you write something like: var p = new Process(); p.StartInfo.FileName = "cmd.exe"; p.Start(); p.WaitForExit(); var exitCode = p.ExitCode; ...


2

The short answer is don't. Use ProcessBuilder instead. It allows you to separate each command line parameter into it's own String and this will appear as a separate "argument" to the process. This makes it really useful for dealing with paths that have spaces in them, for instance... ProcessBuilder pb = new ProcessBuilder( "java", ...


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Generally, it is okay to call functions from other threads. But many GUI libraries (QT is among them) have some restrictions on this behavior. For example, there are designated thread called 'GUI thread' which handles all graphical stuff, like dispatching messages from OS, redrawing windows, etc. And you also restricted to work with GUI withing this only ...


2

If you see the definition of fork it says that the child and parent are exact same copy and both start executing at the next instruction. Now, Since C doesn't flush output until a newline is printed or you explicitly flush output, the "do" stays in buffer and gets copied to child too. use: printf(" do "); fflush(stdout); or printf(" do \n"); //Notice ...


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If a running code is not designed to react to attempts to interrupt it, then we can do nothing about it. As a workaround we can run it in a separate process and cancel it with Process.destroy()


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You will have to either: compile your LabVIEW vi either into exe (and then use any standard Java Method to call exe) compile it into a DLL and then use JNI to call it. I would use the first approach unless you are passing huge data chunks, using memory-mapped IO, or otherwise need fine memory allocation control. or call labview.exe, passing your VI as ...


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You use Application.runInBackground = true; to make your Application run in the background. Set it to false to make it NOT run in the background. Application.runInBackground = false;


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I went ahead and tried to see how much grief just creating the process detached would cause me, whether that would still allow me to use signal callbacks etc and all seems well. So I'm just going to implement it that way. Here was my original code: self.oUIProcessHandle = spawn('chromium-browser', ['http://127.0.0.1:8091/index.html', '-kiosk', ...


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The first thing you'll need to do is perform the glob (represented by * in your classpath). You can also use a ProcessBuilder - which is used to create operating system processes. And, a List<String> or command(s), and a StringBuilder to perform the glob. Something like, public static void main(String[] args) { String home = ...


1

There are several things to change or improve. A structural VHDL model should describe your schematic, which you don't really do. First, why do you have shift_counter in your structural? You don't need that process. Second, you instantiate 4 of your flip-flop entity which are each 4 bits wide, while your schematic's has 4 flip-flops. Basically, you ...


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In short: both. Eclipse is a product written in Java, so it requires Java VM to run. For convenience Eclipse installation contains its own native loader (eclipse.exe), which is a program that searches for a JVM library to use. The loader can either load JVM dynamically into its own process, which results in single process being visible in task manager, or ...


1

It is supposed to create a worker for you.. It is not well documented in the library docs but: 1) You can see at the dependencies, it depends on node-worker. 2) If the cron job were to be blocking, then the waiting for the cron job to execute (in this case, a minute) would be blocking as well. This is because the main thread will just wait until it has to do ...


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I suggest you prefer a ProcessBuilder over Runtime.exec. Also, if I understand your qestion, then you can pass the full path to the exe file to your ProcessBuilder. Something like, ProcessBuilder pb = new ProcessBuilder("C:\\Windows\\system32\\calc.exe"); pb.inheritIO(); // <-- passes IO from forked process. try { Process p = pb.start(); // <-- ...


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eclipse.exe is the application itself, javaw.exe is the jvm that runs eclipse.exe. If you terminate javaw.exe it will terminate eclipse.exe also.


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This question was asked ages ago, but for what it's worth - I ended up using Hangfire to handle my long running tasks in my ASP app. You can easily configure it for shared hosting and then for a dedicated server if you can scale up / out according to your needs. It's super easy to use, just follow the doc step by step. Cheers, Andrew


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Great code. Just one tiny little problem: you must declare in the ExecCmd (after Dim start As STARTUPINFO): Dim ret as Long You will get an error when trying to compile in VB6 if you don't. But it works great :) Kind regards


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If you run screen with -Dm, it will not return to you command line prompt (the "no fork" idea; that's why it doesn't do anything until your java exits if you have no ampersand). If you run it with the -dm, it returns to your command line prompt immediately. By putting the -Dm in the background, you have caused it to fork and set $! with the PID of your ...



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