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2

You could pass a new multiprocessing.Lock() to every fetcher you start. In the fetcher's process, be sure to wrap the Queue.put() with this lock: with self.lock: self.queue.put(result) When you need to terminate a fetcher's process, use the its lock : with fetcherLock: fetcherProcess.terminate() This way, your queue won't get corrupted by ...


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simply check the array you got Process[] chromeInstances = Process.GetProcessesByName("chrome"); if (chromeInstances.Length > 0) { //then chrome is up } else { //not working now }


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just use: pgrep -P $your_process1_pid


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If you get this, the app has installed on your device. You have to tap the icon. It will ask you if you really want to run it. Say “yes” and then Build & Run again.


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I have the same issue. I click ok in xcode and when launching the app on my iPhone I'm asked if I want to trust this application. Doing it, the app runs and further build-and-run from xcode went without any issue until deleting the app from the iPhone and reinstalling it. Then goto first line ;-)


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What you're describing is pefectly suited for multiprocessing.Pool - specifically its map method: import multiprocessing from functools import partial def call_function(string1, string2, int1, element): # Do stuff here if __name__ == "__main__": li=[a,b,c,d,e] p = multiprocessing.Pool(N) # The pool will contain N worker processes. # Use ...


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cp.exec get the working directory in parameter options http://nodejs.org/docs/latest/api/child_process.html#child_process_child_process_exec_command_options_callback Use var cp = require("child_process"); cp.exec("./run.sh", {cwd: path}, function(error,stdout,stderr){ }); for running script in the "path" directory.


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Have you tried to use strace -p $PID on the python process? The output will not always be useful however. From the code perspective, in addition to threads I would check if there are any signal handlers (which maybe do not terminate for some reason). As far as threads are concerned, you might be interested in this, although I believe someone mentioned it ...


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My recommended solution is to create a new WorkItemHandler implementation that calls the web service get the results and inject that as a process variable. You can see a similar example that calls web services here: https://github.com/droolsjbpm/jbpm-playground/tree/master/customer-relationships-workitems HTH


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I like the way you think :D UI automation is awesome On the question itself, as far as I can tell, all the software that can interact with the GUI of processes is based on computer vision with OCR or reading the memory to get the object model of the UI. The latter is probably not universal, since different widget toolkits and approaches to building the UI ...


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The Process class fires an Exited event when the process exits. You can add a handler to that event to execute code when the process exits without blocking the UI thread: process.EnableRaisingEvents = true; process.Exited += (s, args) => DoStuff(); Alternatively you could create a Task that represents the completion of the process to leverage the TPL ...


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You should start process in BackgroundWorker so you can catch complete event on same thread. BackgroundWorker worker = new BackgroundWorker(); worker.DoWork += delegate { Process proc = Process.Start("YOUR-PROCESS-PATH"); proc.Start(); proc.WaitForExit(); } worker.RunWorkerCompleted += ...


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Here is my favorite way to do something like this with a BackgroundWorker. This has the advantage of the RunWorkerCompleted callback being on the main thread, so it can interact with the UI. public partial class Form1 : Form { ... private BackgroundWorker wrk; private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) { wrk = new ...


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Here you go: void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) { Task.Factory.StartNew(() => { var p = Process.Start("notepad.exe"); p.WaitForExit(); }).ContinueWith(antecedant => { MessageBox.Show("Notepad closed"); }); }


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(1) whether the "second way" will be slower than "first way" Starting a new process is an expensive operation therefore there should not be a large difference between allowing the shell to parse the command line and start child processes and doing it yourself in Python. The only benchmark that matters is your code on your hardware. Measure it. (2) ...



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