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6

Yes, because it's the output of the other process. You're only able to read from it. From the documentation. Gets a stream used to read the output of the application. I know it's a bit confusing, but think of it as StandardOutput from the perspective of the process. (Not from your perspective, as another process looking at it.) If you want to write ...


4

Estimating burst time of a process is a very large topic . in general scheduler estimates the length of the next burst based on the lengths of recent cpu bursts. basically what we do is to guess the next CPU burst time by assuming that it will be related to past CPU bursts for that process . A quick google search led me to this article which will give you a ...


2

How pids and tids are stored behind the scenes is implementation dependent, typically through usage of the pid_t type. Usually they are just signed integers.


2

There is no tool which can do that. To see which process currently has a file open, you can use fuser and lsof. To get a history of changes, you need to run a process which watches the file system for changes. You can use the inotify service to build this. Related: Inotify - how to use it? - linux


2

Save the process instance to variable , then subscribe to ProcessExit, when the event is triggered, kill the process. var process = System.Diagnostics.Process.Start(startInfo); AppDomain.CurrentDomain.ProcessExit += (a,b) => process.Kill();


2

Is it safe if I use the same variable to create another subprocess if previous subprocess finishes? Yes. It would also be safe if the subprocess weren't finished, since you're completely replacing the value stored in p with a new value (a new object reference). In fact, your assignment in the loop you've shown isn't overwriting the previous value at ...


1

In a loop like this: while(waitForNext) { Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(cmd); // ... p.waitFor(); cmd = nextCmd(); } you are not "reusing a variable" (p). The variable goes out of scope when you leave the block. Reentering it, creates a new variable. This is reusing variable p, and it's safe according to ...


1

I'm not sure there's a guaranteed way to do what you are asking, but you can get close. In Scala (and Java), you can tell the VM to run a block of code for you before it exits in what's called a shutdown hook. By defining a hook, you can have it attempt to kill off your Process before the VM exits. Note, that in the Scaladoc for sys.addShutdownHook, there ...


1

ps -o pmem h -p processID pmem: Ratio of the process's resident set size to the physical memory on the machine, expressed as a percentage.


1

You could use pmap $PID or perhaps cat /proc/$PID/maps and/or cat /proc/$PID/status See proc(5) for details.


1

If there is no foreground Activity or Service, does Android kill each individual background service, or does it just kill the process itself? Android does not kill individual Activities or Services, that wouldn't make much sense. For example if an Activity is in the background Android will never decide to specifically kill this one Activity. It ...


1

In this the Threadcount is the No of threads that process is currently using. In you'r situation the process explorer is using 30 threads. Thread count is used for avoiding orphan threads so before closing the process thread count should be zero.


1

Basically to let the script kill itself, point it to $$ which presents the process ID of the shell. kill "$$" Avoid SIGKILL (9) when not necessary. Only use it on applications that get significantly unresponsive. The default signal sent is SIGTERM (15), and there are other signals that could also terminate the process which may be safer than SIGKILL. One ...


1

A thought that might solve your original problem (and is a consideration for using pipes in shell): Using stdio commands such as popen, fwrite, etc involve buffering. If a program on the write end of the pipe only writes a small amount of data to the pipe, the program on the reading end won't see any of it until a full block of data has been written to ...


1

bash naturally makes piping between processes very easy, so commands to create and open pipes are not normally needed program1 | program2 This is the equivalent of program1 running popen("program2","w"); It could also be achieved by program2 running popen("program1","r"); If you explicitly want to use a named pipe: mkfifo /tmp/mypipe program1 ...


1

You simply run the process in the background. espeak -x -q -z >/dev/null 2>/tmp/mypipe &


1

Just kill the process when your application ends. You can register Form.Closing from your Main form application. private void Form1_Closing(object sender, System.ComponentModel.CancelEventArgs e) { Process [] localByName = Process.GetProcessesByName("yoursubprocess"); foreach (var process in processes) { process.Kill() ; } } ...


1

Perhaps your octave script runs in a background. You can use this workaround: waitpid() { while kill -s 0 "$1" >/dev/null 2>&1; do sleep 1 done } cd fisher; octave computeFisherScore-AG.m $EXP_ID; waitpid "$!" cd ..; octave predictability-AG.m $EXP_ID $NUM_FEATURES; May I also suggest that you quote your arguments properly to ...


1

Try: EXP_ID = $1; NUM_FEATURES = $2; cd fisher; octave computeFisherScore-AG.m $EXP_ID; wait cd ..; octave predictability-AG.m $EXP_ID $NUM_FEATURES; wait Check out http://www.lehman.cuny.edu/cgi-bin/man-cgi?wait+3


1

It seems GNOME Terminal exits immediately after starting, which is obvious if you run for example gnome-terminal -x sleep 10. Since it doesn't wait for the command to finish, there's no way the return code will be that of the command. I could find no option in gnome-terminal --help-all to keep the process in the foreground. Regarding your second question, ...


1

Anything can be dangerous. The better solution is to save your PID to a file everytime you run an instance. If a PID file exists and if the PID in that file is a valid and is an active process, kill that process. Save the PID of the current process after. PID_FILE=/var/run/infinite.pid # Read saved PID of previous instance. read PID < "$PID_FILE" # You ...


1

There's MainWindowHandle property which can help you for that : Process[] processes = Process.GetProcessesByName("yourprocess.exe"); foreach (Process p in processes) { IntPtr windowHandle = p.MainWindowHandle; }



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