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4

Command::new is indeed the way to go, but it is meant to execute a program. ls ; sleep 1; ls is not a program, it's instructions for some shell. If you want to execute something like that, you would need to ask a shell to interpret that for you: Command::new("/usr/bin/sh").args(&["-c", "ls ; sleep 1; ls"]) // your complex command is just an argument for ...


3

A running process is not an assembly; it's the result of an executable assembly being executed on the processor by the operating system. For example, let's think about an assembly (exe or dll) as a set of instructions for building an RC model plane. The instructions don't ever have to be "run" -- i.e. you don't ever have to build the plane; they could ...


2

If you don't need the handle, you should close it. However, the consequences for failing to do so are slight, unless you are spawning a great many processes. The kernel will have to retain the process object (I presume this is roughly analogous to a zombie process in UNIX) but there is no fixed limit on the number of process objects and a terminated ...


1

Here you go: using (var p = new Process()) { p.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true; p.StartInfo.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden; p.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false; p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true; p.StartInfo.FileName = "cmd.exe"; p.StartInfo.Arguments = "/C dir"; p.Start(); var output = p.StandardOutput....


1

If you look up what taskkill actually does you will find that it sends a WM_CLOSE message to the message loop of the process. So you need to find a way to handle this message and exit the application. The following small test application shows a way to do just that. If you run it from Visual Studio using the CTRL+F5 shortcut (so that the process runs ...


1

I could never get it to work with synchronous reads of stdout without closing stdin, but it does work with async reading for stdout/stderr. No need to pass in /c, you only do that when passing in a command through the arguments; you are not doing this though, you are sending the command directly to the input. var p = new Process() { ...


1

All the code related to load-balancing with CFS is in fair.c. Look for "struct lb_env" that'll show you the source and destination cpus for a task.


1

You just need a conditional statement bool bStartSomething = false; // Your condition flag private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) { if (bStartSomething == true) { Process.Start("Something.exe"); } else { Process.Start("Somethingelse.exe"); } this.Close(); // Close GUI } if you need to check if ...


1

waitFor() does exactly what you expect. Your understanding isn't wrong. I suspect the program you're running is indeed exiting immediately, causing waitFor() to return straight away. It may be starting one or more child processes that are doing the real work while the parent process exits.


1

The process handle is returned when you call _spawnv in asynchronous mode. I assume the handle is always valid since you can attempt to wait for the spawned process via _cwait (which closes the given handle if it is not a pseudo handle identifying the calling process or thread). When a process terminates, its kernel objects exists until all handle and ...


1

When you remove an entry from the recent applications list, you are removing a task related to an app process (which can contain multiple activities). You can do this by software BUT you'll need two permissions which can only be used if your app has system level privileges (which isn't your case, because only firmware level apps can have that with a special ...


1

What I do on Windows is use Sysinternals Process Explorer (https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.) In its default Show Process Tree view you can see all processes spawned by emacs underneath it, and kill any or all of them, leaving emacs itself alive. Procexp and Sysinternals in general are extremely convenient, if you don't use them ...


1

That you can see WM_CLOSE at all in an IMessageFilter is quite accidental and an implementation detail of taskkill.exe. You normally only see posted messages, WM_CLOSE is normally sent. I think you see taskkill.exe first trying to ask nicely, only using the sledge-hammer when the app doesn't respond fast enough. Task Manager used to do this as well but ...


1

The issue here is that /bin/cat does not actually write to files, it merely writes to standard out. The output redirection >/tmp/receive.dat is actually performed by the shell, but you are bypassing the shell by invoking cat in this manner. If what you are trying to achieve is merely an OutputStream that writes to a file, then doing that via standard ...



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