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Is it safe if I use the same variable to create another subprocess if previous subprocess finishes? Yes. It would also be safe if the subprocess weren't finished, since you're completely replacing the value stored in p with a new value (a new object reference). In fact, your assignment in the loop you've shown isn't overwriting the previous value at ...


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I'm not sure there's a guaranteed way to do what you are asking, but you can get close. In Scala (and Java), you can tell the VM to run a block of code for you before it exits in what's called a shutdown hook. By defining a hook, you can have it attempt to kill off your Process before the VM exits. Note, that in the Scaladoc for sys.addShutdownHook, there ...


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When you redirect standard I/O of a process, you have to make sure you're actually reading the input at all times. There's limited buffers in play, so if one of the processes stops reading its inputs, writing to it from another process will block until the buffers are emptied / read. The easiest way to handle this properly is to always use asynchronous I/O ...


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You should change the entry in the /etc/inittab file. Probably your gmond service entry is starting with respawn. It will respawn every time you kill the process. Link: To disable the process you have to edit /etc/inittab and comment out that line. To inform init about this change you have to send a SIGHUP to init: kill -HUP pid-of-init The /etc/inittab ...


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Yes, but threads may also count as processes, so it's really an upper limit.


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You can do this by accepting command line arguments.something like this int main ( int argc, char *argv[] ) { enter code here return 0; } Where, First argument to main function (argc) refers to the number of arguments being passed to the program at run-time. Second (char *argv[] )refers to a string containing the arguments that are passed (char * is ...


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All the tasks that the OS has to perform cannot be allocated memory immediately after the task is submitted to the OS. So they have to remain in the new state. The decision as to when they move to the ready state is taken by the Long term scheduler. More info about long term scheduler here ...


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I think the problem is you are using println to write while the original output is written using print. \r makes the cursor go to the beginning of the current line, but println make it one forward. I'd try to use print instead of println. You could check if the line starts with a \r character and if no, then add a new line after that.


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Using java.nio package's file lock could be a better solution, I hope. But, I think java.nio is not full-fledged till JDK 1.6. http://www.withoutbook.com/DifferenceBetweenSubjects.php?subId1=7&subId2=43&d=Java%206%20vs%20Java%207 FileLock: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/nio/channels/FileLock.html


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To be more precise,the new state is for those processes which are just being created.These haven't been created fully and are in it's growing stage. Whereas,the ready state means that the process created which is stored in PCB(Process Control Block) has got all the resources which it required for execution,but CPU is not running that process' instructions, ...


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try this code: String loggedInUser = System.getProperty("user.name"); String pass=""; String psexec = "C:\\Utils\\psexec.exe"; //location of psexec //Build the command line List<String> command = new LinkedList<String>(); command.add(psexec); command.add("-u"); command.add("Administrator"); //request ...


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You can "detach" your child process: Process.detach(pid) See Process#detach for more info. If you're running your script on a shell, and if your script is the last interactive process, your virtual terminal may exit and cause your child process to hangup as well. If you consider not sending output to the terminal, you can use Process.daemon before ...


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In a loop like this: while(waitForNext) { Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(cmd); // ... p.waitFor(); cmd = nextCmd(); } you are not "reusing a variable" (p). The variable goes out of scope when you leave the block. Reentering it, creates a new variable. This is reusing variable p, and it's safe according to ...


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ps -o pmem h -p processID pmem: Ratio of the process's resident set size to the physical memory on the machine, expressed as a percentage.


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You could use pmap $PID or perhaps cat /proc/$PID/maps and/or cat /proc/$PID/status See proc(5) for details.


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If there is no foreground Activity or Service, does Android kill each individual background service, or does it just kill the process itself? Android does not kill individual Activities or Services, that wouldn't make much sense. For example if an Activity is in the background Android will never decide to specifically kill this one Activity. It ...


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In this the Threadcount is the No of threads that process is currently using. In you'r situation the process explorer is using 30 threads. Thread count is used for avoiding orphan threads so before closing the process thread count should be zero.


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Basically to let the script kill itself, point it to $$ which presents the process ID of the shell. kill "$$" Avoid SIGKILL (9) when not necessary. Only use it on applications that get significantly unresponsive. The default signal sent is SIGTERM (15), and there are other signals that could also terminate the process which may be safer than SIGKILL. One ...


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A thought that might solve your original problem (and is a consideration for using pipes in shell): Using stdio commands such as popen, fwrite, etc involve buffering. If a program on the write end of the pipe only writes a small amount of data to the pipe, the program on the reading end won't see any of it until a full block of data has been written to ...


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bash naturally makes piping between processes very easy, so commands to create and open pipes are not normally needed program1 | program2 This is the equivalent of program1 running popen("program2","w"); It could also be achieved by program2 running popen("program1","r"); If you explicitly want to use a named pipe: mkfifo /tmp/mypipe program1 ...


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You simply run the process in the background. espeak -x -q -z >/dev/null 2>/tmp/mypipe &



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