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1212

If you get this, the app has installed on your device. You have to tap the icon. It will ask you if you really want to run it. Say “yes” and then Build & Run again.


119

Hey so the accepted answer works, except if you need to debug the initial launch of the app. However I think that answer is more of a work around, and not an actual solution. From my understanding this message occurs when you have some weirdness in your provisioning profile / cert setup so make extra sure everything is in tip-top shape in that dept. before ...


48

<p:commandXxx process> <p:ajax process> <f:ajax execute> The process attribute is server side and can only affect UIComponents implementing EditableValueHolder (input fields) or ActionSource (command fields). The process attribute tells JSF, using a space-separated list of client IDs, which components exactly must be processed through the ...


18

In Visual Studio Premium 2013 (Update 3), I solved this with a pre-build one-liner: (if exist "$(TargetDir)*old.pdb" del "$(TargetDir)*old.pdb") & (if exist "$(TargetDir)*.pdb" ren "$(TargetDir)*.pdb" *.old.pdb) This gracefully deletes any old PDB files (if it can), then renames anything that's left with a .old.pdb extension. A nice side effect is ...


14

To fix the process launch failed: Security issue, tap the app icon on your iOS device after running the app via Xcode. Be sure to tap the app icon while the Xcode alert is still shown. Otherwise the app will not run. I continually forget this vital step and am unable to run the app on my device. Thus I am documenting it here for myself and everyone else :) ...


10

I have the same issue. I click ok in xcode and when launching the app on my iPhone I'm asked if I want to trust this application. Doing it, the app runs and further build-and-run from xcode went without any issue until deleting the app from the iPhone and reinstalling it. Then goto first line ;-)


9

If you have a hard time remembering the default values (I know I have...) here's a short extract from BalusC's answer:


8

To get the top (Foreground) package name currently running you need to use the Usage Stats API. in Android Lollipop. But notice user has to approve the access to usage data in the settings for each Application. So you should promt the user directly to the setting by launching setting action with Intent intent = new ...


8

In new versions of Android you can see list of wakelocks here: adb shell "cat /sys/kernel/debug/wakeup_sources"


8

Copying my own answer from How to run a Node.js application as its own process? 2015 answer: nearly every Linux distro comes with systemd, which means forever, monit, etc are no longer necessary - your OS already handles these tasks. Make a myapp.service file (replacing 'myapp' with your app's name, obviously): [Unit] Description=My app [Service] ...


7

Threads and processes A thread is essentially a subdivision of a process, or "lightweight process" (LWP) on some systems. A process is generally the most major and separate unit of execution recognised by the OS. The typical relationship between processes, threads and various other elements of the OS are shown in Figure 1 opposite. This shows two processes, ...


7

It will execute separately unless you either block waiting for data from the other process (e.g. calling Process.getInputStream() and then reading from it), or call Process.waitFor(). The second process has its own threads - these are not the threads of the process that happens to start the second process. Of course, it's possible that both processes will ...


7

You could use a filter: filter timestamp {"$(Get-Date -Format o): $_"} $result = & ping 192.168.1.1 | timestamp Sample output from $result: 2014-12-08T11:42:59.2827202-05:00: 2014-12-08T11:42:59.2857205-05:00: Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data: 2014-12-08T11:43:03.1241043-05:00: Request timed out. 2014-12-08T11:43:08.1236042-05:00: Request ...


6

Yes, because it's the output of the other process. You're only able to read from it. From the documentation. Gets a stream used to read the output of the application. I know it's a bit confusing, but think of it as StandardOutput from the perspective of the process. (Not from your perspective, as another process looking at it.) If you want to write ...


6

Yes, F# interactive window basically output of fsi.exe process running separately from Visual Studio. In Visual Studio Tools/Options menu you can choose 64-bit mode for this fsi process.


6

No it is not. PID is process identifier, and file descriptor is file handler identifier. Specifically from Wikipedia about File Descriptors: (...) file descriptor (FD) is an abstract indicator for accessing a file. The term is generally used in POSIX operating systems. In POSIX, a file descriptor is an integer, specifically of the C type int. (...) ...


6

'.exe' is not part of the process name, you just want: foreach (var process in Process.GetProcessesByName("chromedriver"))


6

You can find the System Error codes reference on MSDN: ERROR_SUCCESS 0 (0x0) The operation completed successfully. As it's the only one code for success and other for error, the section is called Error codes. This isn't specific for C#, only for Windows. Also note that you can scan the standard input/output/error streams for the ...


6

The NewRelic gem provides simple RSS usage implementations for a number of operating systems and ruby runtimes with their MemorySampler class. Include the newrelic_rpm gem in your Gemfile and invoke it thus: NewRelic::Agent::Samplers::MemorySampler.new.sampler.get_sample and it returns the number of megabytes of memory the current process holds as the ...


6

There are advantages to pinning a process to one core, primarily caching which you already mentioned. There are also disadvantages -- you get unequal heating, which can create mechanical stresses that do not improve the expected lifetime of the silicon die. To avoid this, OSes tend to keep all cores at equal utilization. When there's only one active ...


6

There is no built-in way to copy processes. The easiest way to do it is to start the "original" process and the "copies" and send all the relevant data in messages to the copies. Processes don't share data so there is no more efficient way of doing it. Putting the data in ETS tables only partially helps with sharing as the data in the ETS tables are copied ...


6

I guess its a clear case of topological sorting of graph which is used to resolve dependencies, Here we need to create a directed graph with nodes as the processes you mentioned. Now there is a directed edge from x1 to x2 if x1 is dependent on x2 and so on. Once graph is created, topological sort on the graph is your answer.


6

Node will not exit if there is a socket that is listening. So that's the TL;DR answer. (The other answers talking about the event queue are correct about that being a possible cause of programs not exiting, but that is not what is going on with server.listen().) Under the hood, http.createServer() is (eventually) calling server.listen() Calling ...


6

There are a couple of problems here. Firstly, GetProcessId is the name of a Windows API function, that takes a single HANDLE as a parameter. HANDLE is usually defined as void* and so what this means is that any pointer will satisfy the function signature. Your own GetProcessId takes a std::string but you're calling it by passing it a pointer to a string ...


5

Wikipedia is referring to user-level threading, wherein an entire group of threads is assigned to a single kernel thread. So when one of the threads does an I/O operation, control passes to the kernel, and the kernel thread will block while waiting for the I/O operation to complete. But since each thread in the group maps to that same kernel thread, the rest ...


5

You are correct, 7 processes are forked (plus there's the original parent process, for a grand total of 8). The key concept is that forked processes are initially (near-)exact duplicates of their parents, so in particular, they have the same variable values, and start executing by returning from the fork() call. This table maps out the forks that will ...


5

An Erlang process has no process-specific data apart from what's stored in variables (and the process dictionary), so to make a copy of the memory of a process, just spawn a new process passing all relevant variables as arguments to the function. In general, memory is not shared between processes; everything is copied. The exceptions are ETS tables (though ...


5

The simplest way would probably be to write it to the standard output (i.e. the console) of the "child" process. The "parent" process can then read the standard output (and error) of that process. See Process.StandardOutput. Alternatively, you could use sockets, named pipes or something like that. That's certainly significantly harder, but would be ...


5

In order: pid: The is the process ID (PID) of the process you call the Process.pid method in. ppid: The PID of the parent process (the process that spawned the current one). For example, if you run ruby test.rb in a bash shell, PPID in that process would be the PID of Bash. uid: The UNIX ID of the user the process is running under. euid: The effective ...


5

wait command waits for a given background job to complete. Use it like this: ( sleep 5; exit 4 ) & wait $! ret=$? echo $ret 4 $! represents process id of the most recent background job. In your case you can do: SomeCommand & wait $! echo $? To start multiple background jobs and retrieve their exit statuses later, save the value of $! after ...



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