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You can use a weakref, to test, if the thread is still alive: import weakref def consumer(queue, threads): while threads: try: response = queue.get(timeout=1) # handle response queue.task_done() except Empty: pass threads = weakref.WeakSet() for i in range(10): t = ...


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@ Daniel : weakref is a cool trick. Here is an alternate method that just uses the queue with an added 'termination policy'. You will need to ensure each producer's thread target functions always put a final 'termination message' to the queue, essentially a None after they've finished producing. The consumer just waits until the appropriate number of ...


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STL C++ containers are not thread-safe: if you decide for them, you need to use proper synchronizations (basically std::mutex and std::lock) when pushing/popping elements. Alternatively you can use properly designed containers (single-producer-single-consumer queues should fit your needs), one example of them here: ...


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Just design your Producer and Consumer classes to accept the BlockingCollection as a constructor parameter. Then, wherever you instantiate these classes, and perhaps even more than one of each, just make sure to pass in the same instance of the BlockingCollection to all producers and consumers. Once you've done that, there is no need to keep some other ...


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In case you end up using my comment Put a dummy item in the collection that wakes up the producer


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One of the most robust ways to handle asynchronous events and process a chains/graphs of actions upon these events are FSMs. Qt provides a basis for implementing FSMs with its Qt-State machine framework. I'd suggest to go this way. Unfortunately all the examples provided by Qt for FSM are dealing with GUIs and animations. The advantage of FSM approach is, ...


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In practice, you should not use mutex to solve a producer/consumer or reader-writer problem. It necessarily does not give rise to deadlocks but might lead to starvation of either producers or consumers. I used a similar approach to code a reader/writer lock. You could check it out: https://github.com/prathammalik/OS161/blob/master/kern/thread/synch.c


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I had the same problem. I noted that this happens when you consume a topic with more than one partition. If you specify the partition number in the topic of the consumer it will only consume from one partition and will not get older messages. Try changing: var payloads = [ { topic: topic }]; to var payloads = [ { topic: topic, partition : 0 }];


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How Can I develop a producer/ consumer pattern which is thread safe? There are several ways, but using locks and monitors is fairly easy to grasp and doesn't have many hidden caveats. The standard library has std::unique_lock, std::lock_guard and std::condition_variable to implement the pattern. Check out the cppreference page of condition_variable for ...


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By no means, ArrayBlockingQueue is better. When using an Exchanger, one of communicating threads would always be blocked, with an ArrayBlockingQueue, blocking occur only producer's and consumer's speeds are unbalanced. Using ArrayLists makes sense to reduce contention, and can be used together with ArrayBlockingQueue too. UPDATE Exchanger.exchange() ...


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Ok i knew what is going on. In worker.py, I misspell ch.basic_ack(delivery_tag=method.delivery_tag) to ch.basic_ask(delivery_tag=method.delivery_tag) My God!T.T



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