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2870

Your problem with Vim is that you don't grok vi. You mention cutting with yy and complain that you almost never want to cut whole lines. In fact programmers, editing source code, very often want to work on whole lines, ranges of lines and blocks of code. However, yy is only one of many way to yank text into the anonymous copy buffer (or "register" as ...


506

You are talking about text selecting and copying, I think that you should give a look to the Vim Visual Mode. In the visual mode, you are able to select text using Vim commands, then you can do whatever you want with the selection. Consider the following common scenarios: You need to select to the next matching parenthesis. You could do: v% if the ...


208

Some productivity tips: Smart movements * and # search for the word under the cursor forward/backward. w to the next word W to the next space-separated word b / e to the begin/end of the current word. (B / E for space separated only) gg / G jump to the begin/end of the file. % jump to the matching { .. } or ( .. ), etc.. { / } jump to next paragraph. '. ...


172

I've been using vi and vim also for some 20 years, and I'm still learning new things. David Rayner's Best of Vim Tips site is an excellent list, though it's probably more useful once you have some familiarity with vim. I also want to mention the ViEmu site which has some great info on vi/vim tips and especially the article Why, oh WHY, do those nutheads ...


117

Could I live without it? Easily. Is it useful? Yes. Reasons for Learning vi is guaranteed to exist on all Unix systems and exists on most Linux ones as well. That kind of broad coverage makes learning it worth it. It's much quicker to use vi for a sudo edit: $ sudo vi Also, GMail uses vi-ish commands for selecting & moving emails around! You ...


108

On one of my current projects, in some modules, I am proud to have contributed a negative line count to the code base. Identifying which areas of code have grown unnecessary complexity and can be simplified with a cleaner and clearer design is a useful skill. Of course some problems are inherently complex and required complex solutions, but on most large ...


104

You asked for it :-) "{{{Auto Commands " Automatically cd into the directory that the file is in autocmd BufEnter * execute "chdir ".escape(expand("%:p:h"), ' ') " Remove any trailing whitespace that is in the file autocmd BufRead,BufWrite * if ! &bin | silent! %s/\s\+$//ge | endif " Restore cursor position to where it was before augroup ...


99

The Control+R mechanism is very useful :-) In either insert mode or command mode (i.e. on the : line when typing commands), continue with a numbered or named register: a - z the named registers " the unnamed register, containing the text of the last delete or yank % the current file name # the alternate file name * the clipboard contents (X11: primary ...


92

Vim Plugins There are a lot of good answers here, and one amazing one about the zen of vi. One thing I don't see mentioned is that vim is extremely extensible via plugins. There are scripts and plugins to make it do all kinds of crazy things the original author never considered. Here are a few examples of incredibly handy vim plugins: rails.vim ...


91

I've been a C++ programmer for several years and now I'm a full-time C# programmer. To be totally honest, I don't think having automated memory management really makes me that much more productive because once you get use to it, it's really not such a big deal. To me, the main productivity gain in C# is the .NET framework library and visual studio ...


91

Unix Use the jar (or unzip -v), grep, and find commands. For example, the following will list all the class files that match a given name: for i in *.jar; do jar -tvf "$i" | grep -Hsi ClassName; done If you know the entire list of Java archives you want to search, you could place them all in the same directory using (symbolic) links. Or use find (case ...


83

In Visual Studio 2010, there is the new Navigate To-feature. Press Ctrl+, to open the Navigate To window. Then, you can type the name of the file you are looking for and browse to it quickly. Additional benefits: This works not only with files, but with member declarations as well. This is a more universal solution than using the Find drop down on the ...


82

Running through vimtutor only took me 30 minutes, which was enough to get familiar with vim. It was worth every second of it.


78

All my experience and readings lead to one, consistent, conclusion: no formal and objective measurement of the productivity of programmers is fair. In the same way that programmers are required to use their judgment in deciding which problems to solve and how to solve them, managers are required to observe their reports and use their judgment in evaluating ...


76

If you want to append to a named register use it's corresponding upper case character. i.e. In your example: "ayy "Ayy "ap


75

As ZyX said on #vim, this question sounds like "Why do Vim experts prefer tasty over warm?". "Vim experts" don't prefer buffers over tabs: they use buffers as the file proxies they are and tab pages as the workspaces they are. Buffers and tab pages have different purposes so preferring one to the other makes no sense whatsoever. The issue with buffers and ...


74

I don't believe so (but I may be wrong). You can do something like this: (gdb) define fn > finish > next > end And then just type: (gdb) fn You can put this in your ~/.gdbinit file as well so it is always available.


73

This isn't in my .vimrc file, but yesterday I learned about the ]p command. This pastes the contents of a buffer just like p does, but it automatically adjusts the indent to match the line the cursor is on! This is excellent for moving code around.


59

@Bill Karwin Thanks for your elaboration. In a way, the problem is not the compile time itself, it is the fact that a long compile time leads to distraction which breaks your "flow." If a compile takes longer than a minute, then you start to read your e-mail, browser Reddit, read Slashdot, write another paragraph in the specification you need to finish for ...


57

If you're a programmer who edits a lot of text, then it's important to learn an A Serious Text Editor. Which Serious Text Editor you learn is not terribly important and is largely dependent on the types of environments you expect to be editing in. The reason is that these editors are highly optimized to perform the kinds of tasks that you will be doing a ...


55

I like this quote: If we wish to count lines of code, we should not regard them as "lines produced" but as "lines spent". - Edsger Dijkstra Some times you have contributed more by removing code than adding


54

Checking back to Stack Overflow every 15 minutes to see if your reputation points have gone up? Seriously I've found that e-mail is the most distracting thing in my day. I used to have a policy that I'd check mail once in the beginning of the day, then again after lunch. Now that I'm a manager I can't do that as much.


54

. Repeat last text-changing command I save a lot of time with this one. Visual mode was mentioned previously, but block visual mode has saved me a lot of time when editing fixed size columns in text file. (accessed with Ctrl-V).


53

I use the following to keep all the temporary and backup files in one place: set backup set backupdir=~/.vim/backup set directory=~/.vim/tmp Saves cluttering working directories all over the place. You will have to create these directories first, vim will not create them for you.


52

In Effective Java, Chapter 7 (Methods), Item 40 (Design method signatures carefully), Bloch writes: There are three techniques for shortening overly long parameter lists: break the method into multiple methods, each which require only a subset of the parameters create helper classes to hold group of parameters (typically static member classes) adapt the ...


49

gi Go to last edited location (very useful if you performed some searching and than want go back to edit) ^P and ^N Complete previous (^P) or next (^N) text. ^O and ^I Go to previous (^O - "O" for old) location or to the next (^I - "I" just near to "O"). When you perform searches, edit files etc., you can navigate through these "jumps" forward and ...


48

Rubber duck debugging or Cardboard Programmer?


47

I recently (got) discovered this site: http://vimcasts.org/ It's pretty new and really really good. The guy who is running the site switched from textmate to vim and hosts very good and concise casts on specific vim topics. Check it out!


47

From the ViM manual: 5. Replace mode *Replace* *Replace-mode* *mode-replace* Enter Replace mode with the "R" command in normal mode. Of course you can map any key to R, for example by doing :map <F5> R HTH.


46

I think the number of lines added is highly dependent upon the state of the project, the rate of adding to a new project will be much higher than the rate of a starting project. The work is different between the two - at a large project you usually spend most of the time figuring the relationships between the parts, and only a small amount to actually ...



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