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6

You can use profsave to save the results of the profiler as HTML that you can then open and navigate with your web browser. profile on % Run your code to profile profile off % Path where you want to store the HTML profiler results html_folder = 'path/to/html'; profsave(profile('info'), html_folder)


2

If you want to benchmark different versions of your app, you can easily achieve this in Profiles in Chrome DevTools. You can record and save them to your computer, and then load them again anytime in the future. It's not just for the current session. For example, you record your profile for Version 1. A few days later you load up your app in Chrome, record ...


1

There's an example here that shows profilter output, and two of the steps shown in the result are: | Waiting for query cache lock | 0.000004 | | checking query cache for query | 0.000151 | This suggests that it does use the query cache. Other sites that demonstrate how to profile queries include turning off the query cache.


1

We have found out that the compilation debug flag was set to TRUE in the web.config. Also we verified that all modules in use by the application were not compiled in debug mode. Memory consumption is now as expected!


1

You should be able to create an appender and then set the appropriate logger (looks to be com.linkedin.grails) to append to it with additivity set to false. grails 3.x: appender("PROFILER", FileAppender) { file = "profiler.log" encoder(PatternLayoutEncoder) { pattern = "%level %logger - %msg%n" } } logger("com.linkedin.grails", DEBUG, ["...


1

Indeed ProfilerEnable/Disable is not working anymore. There is already request for pausing/unpausing profiling https://github.com/gperftools/gperftools/issues/597. But note that doing this pausing/unpausing frequently is likely to have performance impact. I think you should profile all of your app and then use --focus feature of pprof to filter out ...


1

All other threads simply block all signals. You simply need to unblock SIGPROF in all threads (or in those that you want to profile). We were just solving exactly the same problem in a multi-threaded daemon.


1

A Fortran function call appears as: <ipython-input-51-f4bf36c6a947>:84(<module>). I know, you can't identify which module is being called but at least this gives you an idea. Another way is wrapping it into a Python function and then see timing for the Python function.



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