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13

TL;DR: Don't. The cut prunes Prolog's search tree. That is, given a pure Prolog program without cut and the same program with cuts the only difference is that the program with cuts might spend less time in fruitless branches, and thus is more efficient ; might have fewer answers ; it might also terminate whereas the original program doesn't. Sounds pretty ...


10

A cut commits the Prolog goal being proved to the choices done. It must be used then when the programmer knows that any alternative available must not be tried. The most prominent use it's the implementation of negation by failure. fact(a). fact(b). /* 1 */ neg(X) :- call(X), !, fail. /* 2 */ neg(_). Here I've (re)defined the standard negation ...


8

Before using a cut, I require that my predicates meet these two criteria: it gives correct answers without a cut it gives correct answers if clauses are reordered Once my predicate behaves that way, I sometimes add a cut to trim away unwanted nondeterminism. For example, a predicate to test whether a number is positive, negative or zero. sign(N, ...


8

I agree with @dasblinkenlight and @mbratch. Additionally, I think it's helpful to think in terms of green cuts and red cuts. A green cut is one that doesn't affect the logical behavior of the program, just the performance. They're a way for you to tell Prolog that you know if it keeps going it's not going to bear any fruit. Green cuts are never ...


7

The cut is not used for efficiency, but to commit to the first solution (see the comment next to the !/0: "single solution: longest input match"). If you comment out the !/0, you get for example: ?- parse("abc", E). E = [s(abc)] ; E = [s(ab), s(c)] ; E = [s(a), s(bc)] ; E = [s(a), s(b), s(c)] ; false. It is clear that only the first solution, consisting ...


7

You are touching a quite deep problem here. At the place of the cut you have added the comment "longest input match". But what you actually did was to commit to the first solution which will produce the "longest input match" for the non-terminal ws//0 but not necessarily for expression//1. Many programming languages define their tokens based on the longest ...


7

The (-)/2 to represent difference lists is a rather uncommon convention. In older books, another operator (\)/2 was used too. Many prefer to use two separate arguments instead. There are several advantages compared to using an operator: The predicate cannot accidentally be used with an uninstantiated variable for the argument. Think of calling q(A, X) in ...


7

There's the "hidden" cut in the if-then-else construct of Prolog: abs2(X,Y) :- X < 0 -> Y is -X ; Y = X. It is something of a quirk, but Prolog does not backtrack on the subgoal that forms the "premise" of an if-then or if-then-else construct. Here, if X < 0 succeeds the first try, then the choice of "then" clause over "else" clause is ...


7

In the beginning, try to focus on the pure declarative part of Prolog for a simple reason: It is that part which distinguishes Prolog from other programming languages. Focus on the pure, monotonic part of the language and avoid cuts altogether. How else can you expect that you immerse in this programming paradigm? However, you will certainly encounter ...


6

First a minor issue: the common definition of plus/3 has the first and second argument exchanged which allows to exploit first-argument indexing. See Program 3.3 of the Art of Prolog. That should also be changed in your previous post. I will call your exchanged definition plusp/3 and your optimized definition pluspo/3. Thus, given plusp(X, 0, X) :- ...


6

You could use exceptions. Based on your question - it should help. Refer link


6

There is no direct correspondence of Prolog's execution mechanism and those of traditional imperative languages. So any analogy rather leads you on a dead path. In your example, the cut has no effect whatsoever: The (->)/2 alone will already exclude the Else branch. In a sense it does a "tiny" cut on If and the alternative. Would there be another clause ...


6

The cut in above examples has the following effect: Ideally, it commits the search which might happen within solve_task_a/6 to the first answer found. This frees resources for finding further answers which improves space consumption. Scope problems However, at the same time, it might also hide further answers to agent_current_position/2. Of course, it ...


5

My prolog is a bit rusty, but why do you even need the cut? If you write the predicate properly, backtracking can't succeed, so the cut is unnecessary: abs(X, Y) :- number(X) , X < 0 , Y is -X . abs(X, X) :- number(X) , X >= 0 .


5

It sometimes really makes sense to introduce green cuts — even into append/3, but care must be taken that such a cut remains a green cut. That is, a cut that does improve efficiency (on a certain level) and does not affect answers. There is a very simple rule-of-thumb for introducing green cuts: If you add a cut into a pure, monotonic program without ...


5

The cut is very straight-forward to interpret operationally, or if you prefer, procedurally. However, since the majority of literature on the topics of logic programming and Prolog has a bias towards the declarative meaning of Prolog programs (for good reasons), difficulties in explaining the cut arise. One attempt to rectify this is by "coloring" cuts ...


5

You can use instead the standard if-then-else control construct: double([], []). double([N|L], [M|D]) :- ( even(N) -> M is 2*N ; M is N ), double(L, D). A performance advantage of this alternative solution (besides avoiding repeating computations when an integer is not odd) is that, assuming your Prolog system implements ...


5

If you are just interested in a correct solution, take @PauloMoura's solution. Here is what I think the intention of this exercise was. Take your original program, it seems (at first sight), that one can remove the goal even(N) in the second clause. But before that, let me make clear that the predicate name doubles/2 is a misnomer. I'd rather say ...


4

Try for example the most general query: ?- append2(X, Y, Z).


4

There are two kinds of cuts; green cuts and red cuts. Green cuts are inserted just to improve efficiency and don't change the semantics of the program. Red cuts, on the other hand, do. By definition, green cuts do not cause any problems. So, is there any way that the behaviour would change if the cut wasn't there? Lets see; for the first clause to match, ...


4

Here's my version: list_swizzle([H|T], [], [H|T]). list_swizzle([], L, L). I'm counting on [] not unifying against [H|T] in the first fact. In other words [] has no T because it's the empty list so the first fact doesn't match goals with a [] in the first arg. I've run this successfully on SWI-Prolog (Multi-threaded, 32 bits, Version 5.8.2) $ cat tt.pl ...


4

You could use a construct that has already found its place in Parsing Expression Grammars (PEGs) but which is also available in DCGs. Namely the negation of a DCG goal. In PEGs the exclamation mark (!) with an argument is used for negation, i.e. ! e. In DCG the negation of a DCG goal is expressed by the (\+) operator, which is already used for ordinary ...


4

There are several possibilities to make the goal swap(List, List1) fail. Either List is a list of length 0 or 1 ; or it does not contain two immediately succeeding elements where the second is smaller than the first. The cut is placed in such a manner that it both cuts swap/2 and the alternative of bubblesort/2. This is a good example, where a "deep cut" ...


4

Using cut in Prolog is very delicate. Most cuts are essentially incorrect, but work still in certain situations. You could use a cut here, provided you want exactly one answer. But since you want the entire set, you are out of luck: You need to explore all answers to determine that set. Fortunately, there is an elegant shortcut for that: setof/3. So ask ?- ...


4

Usually, you use this when you want to make sure that there is no backtracking on a certain combination of variable instantiations. To show some code (borrowed a bit from the SWI-Prolog implementation: read_lines(In, Ls) :- read_line_to_codes(In, Codes), read_lines_rest(Codes, In, Ls). read_lines_rest(end_of_file, _, []) :- !. ...


3

There are 3 SO-answers already, but I cannot agree with a single one! They all are incorrect. How to eliminate redundant solutions Consider the three facts in your definition: mergeL([],[],[]). mergeL(List, [], List). mergeL([], List, List). They all succeed for mergeL([],[],[]) which is the source of your redundancies. The second and third fact are ...


3

Please note that both definitions (the OP's and pad's) do not terminate for a query like fact(0,N). But also fact(1,2) does not terminate. It should fail. And for fact(N, F) it gives only one correct answer, but there should be infinitely many. Using cuts for such purpose is very tricky. The cleanest way to fix this is to add the goal N > 0 to the rule ...


3

Simple way: just add a base case with the empty list. myfunc(_, []) :- !. myfunc(C,[H|T]):- write(C), write(' with '), write(H), nl, myfunc(C,T). test: ?- myfunc(30, [1, 2, 3]). 30 with 1 30 with 2 30 with 3 true. I don't know if this is the best way to do that, but you didn't give us much details about your whole program, so I opted for a ...


3

In a Prolog with ISO Prolog's exception handling (catch/3 and throw/1), a cut could be implemented as: cut. % Simply succeeds cut :- throw(cut). % on backtracking throws an exception This would require to catch that exception at appropriate places. For example, each goal (that is non-terminal) of a user defined predicate could now be wrapped with: ...


3

Why do you make it a generator in the first place when you only want one answer? Just search for answers and return the first one instead of yielding it.



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