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2

You have an issue with take1word/3: it will take a word if there is an integer in the list, but it will not take the last word. You need to add another base clause to it: take1word([], [], []). take1word([H|T],[],T) :- integer(H). take1word([H|T],[H|Hs],Y) :- float(H), take1word(T,Hs,Y); atom(H), take1word(T,Hs,Y). Now your separatewords/2 will work: ...


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You can do it by applying writeln to list elements using maplist/2: mylist([quick,brown,fox,jumps,over,the,lazy,dog]). :-mylist(X), maplist(writeln, X). Demo. The above prints quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog


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I know it's difficult to find accurate information related to my specific question. I have been working on it and finally found a solution, may it not be the best, but makes the deal. I owe the idea to this site. If you find bugs, it'd be welcome. Now, the following code prints the useless states given a finite state automata implemented as above. ...


2

You need to collect ALL of the results for the query member(_, Income), and then to sum them up. To collect all of the matching results you can use one of the metapredicate bagof, setof or findall. Your task can be accomplished by simply: member(a,2). member(b,1). member(c,2). member(d,3). member(e,1). sum([], 0). sum([H|T], S) :- sum(T, S1), S is ...


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The same could be achieved with a maplist: ?- maplist(nth1(2), [['abc',18],['bcd',19],['def',20]], R). R = [18, 19, 20]. Is the argument order of nth/3 a coincidence?


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What does it mean, "add to list"? And how are you going to use this list? One possible way is to write the list as a table of facts, one fact per list element: add_front(X) :- asserta(list(X)). add_back(X) :- assertz(list(X)). To retrieve the list, you can use findall(X, list(X), List): ?- add_front(a), add_front(b), add_back(X). true. ?- ...


2

Here is a definition that implements the relational counterpart to take in functional languages like Haskell1. First, the argument order should be different which facilitates partial application. There is a cut, but only after the error checking built-in (=<)/2 which produces an instantiation_error should the argument contain a variable. take(N, _, Xs) ...


1

If you are not strictly required to use SWI-Prolog, you can easily do this in a Prolog system with tabling support. In B-Prolog, I just added :- table route/2. and now it works: ?- route(fresno, omaha). yes ?- route(fresno, fresno). no ?- route(atlanta, atlanta). yes ?- route(atlanta, X). X = albany ?; X = dallas ?; X = boston ?; X = seattle ?; X = omaha ...


1

So you can't use lists (I wonder why) but can you use a counter variable? Try iteratively deepening search where you do depth-first search first in the depth of 1, then 2, and so on. That would prevent the infinite loops with cycles. Remember to have an upper limit for search depth to avoid infinite looping in case where there is no connection.


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Hoogle was not very useful, but Hayoo is! foldcmpl so this is a special form of fold for a list, but it does not apply length list times but one time less. isSortedBy is not entirely general in its name, but in its signature. Maybe insisting on the most general name is not that helpful. Otherwise we just have entities all over? The definition reads: ...


1

You do it the usual Prolog way - by defining a recursive rule that covers two clauses: When the number is 0, its factorial is 1 - This can be done with a simple fact. When the number is greater than zero, compute Number-1, obtain its factorial, and multiplying the result by Number. This should not be too difficult to code up. All you need to know is that ...


1

Probably unique/1 is all different: unique([]). unique([E|Es]) :- maplist(dif(E), Es), unique(Es).


1

You have most of what you need: add a rule that computes the length of a list of lists that passes the head on to my_length: my_length_lol([], 0). my_length_lol([H|L],N) :- my_length(H,Add), my_length_lol(L,N1), N is N1 + Add. As you can see, my_length_lol ("lol" stands for "List of Lists") is a near exact copy of my_length. The only difference is that it ...


1

As a beginner, the best is to use library(clpfd) which provides all that functionality ; and even more than that. With ?- use_module(library(clpfd)). We start, in SICStus you have now to tell assert(clpfd:full_answer), then we have: ?- 1+2#=Z. Z = 3. ?- 1+Y#=3. Y = 2. as you expected it. But even more than that! ?- X+X#=Z. 2*X#=Z. ?- X+X#=X. X = 0. ...


1

As a beginner, do not start like that. (And your first program is syntactically incorrect ; the first rule does not end with a period). Instead, write a relation month_day_sign/3 which you can use directly at the toplevel, like so: ?- month_day_sign(7,24,Sign). Sign = leo. That's the way how you normally interact with Prolog. So you are exploiting the ...


1

see findall/3 and friends ?- L=[['abc',18],['bcd',19],['def',20]], findall(E,member([_,E],L), R). L = [[abc, 18], [bcd, 19], [def, 20]], R = [18, 19, 20].


1

I have the feeling looking at your code and the names you use for variables, that you think that variables are somehow always global. And you don't have to "declare" or "instantiate" a number with N is 1. So your code could be: main :- add(2, 3). add(X, Y) :- sum(X, Y, Sum), write(Sum), /* X is Sum */ write(X), nl. sum(X, Y, Sum) :- Sum is X + ...


1

you can simplify a lot your code replace([], []). replace([O|T], [R|T2]) :- convert(O,R), replace(T, T2). convert(N,1) :- N > 0. convert(N,0) :- N =:= 0. convert(N,-1) :- N < 0. when you have convert/2, you can do ?- maplist(convert, In, Out). and forget about replace/2


1

Such a higher-order predicate would clearly be very useful (example: breaks/1). Like for the foldl/n family of predicates, a mnemonic name for this should in my opinion focus less on the arising algebraic structure, but on the pattern that we find here. For example, this pattern somewhat resembles an accordion, but this is clearly not yet a good name. There ...


1

You need to say at the beginning of the file/module :- use_module(library(clpfd)). And apart from that, you most probably want to say T2 #>= T1 + L1. Also, abs(T2-T1) #>= min(L1,L2) can be said, regardless of the order.


1

Prolog is searching the matches one by one, and returning query result for EACH input, not for all of them. To collect all of the matching values, you can use bagof, setof or findall metapredicates. Here is the code that is doing what you have defined: input(80). input(30). input(25). input(90). compute(I) :- findall(X, (input(X), X>50), L), % Find ...


1

div(L, L1, L2, L3) :- append(L1, L1_suffix, L), append(L2, L3, L1_suffix). Do you see how this splits the three lists? Now you don't say how long you expect the lists L1, L2, and L3 to be. You can use length/2 to get the length of L and set the length of the three results if you don't want the predicate to be as general as it is at the moment. ...


1

The trick is to not allow prolog to choose the next move for you, but rather gather all of the possible moves so you can use your criteria to select the best one. Look into the find_all predicate.


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using a fake metric (see isub) and goal goal(fivex). dfs(A, Path, Path) :- goal(A). dfs(A, Checked, Path) :- % get all possible moves, ordered setof(W-A2, ( move(A, A2), % avoid looping - but in displayed graph there should not be \+memberchk(A2, Checked), % fake metrics value, maybe should be reversed isub(A, A2, ...


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The problem is in your second clause. When you have [X|T], it means that T is a list. In the body you write generate([X,S1],[T]): by writing [T] you're now saying the second argument to generate is a list of which the only element is this list T. What you want to say is that it is simply this list T: generate([T,1], [T]). generate([X,S], [X|T]) :- S1 is ...


1

generate([E,R], Es) :- length(Es, R), maplist(=(E), Es). You said that your version fails. But in fact it does not: ?- generate([a,0], Xs). false. ?- generate([a,1], Xs). Xs = [a] ; false. ?- generate([a,2], Xs). Xs = [a|a] ; false. ?- generate([a,3], Xs). false. It doesn't work for 0, seems to work for length 1, then, produces an incorrect ...


1

Things like these can be better expressed with the program structure: list_altsum([], 0). list_altsum([A], S) :- S is A. list_altsum([A,B|ABs],S0) :- list_alsum(ABs, S1), S0 is A-B+S1. Alternatively: list_altsum(Xs, S) :- list_altsum(Xs, 1, S). list_altsum([], _, 0). list_altsum([A|As], F0, S0) :- F1 is -F0, list_altsum(As, F1, S1), ...


1

This problem naturally leads to an implementation using library(clpfd): :- use_module(library(clpfd)). digitsum(Z,S) :- Z #= 0, S #= 0. digitsum(Z0, S0) :- Z0 #> 0, S0 #> 0, S0 #= Z0 mod 10 + S1, Z1 #= Z0 // 10, % should be rather div digitsum(Z1, S1). ?- digitsum(D,S). D = S, S = 0 ; D = S, S in 1..9 ; D in 10..99, D/10#=_G5601, ...


1

It's breaking on the >= test in validSquare. You can't determine the truth value of X <= Y when both are unbound, basically, because numerical operators don't assign values. You could solve this by using a member to bind the coordinates to valid squares, i.e. validSquare(X1/Y1, X2/Y2):- member(X1, [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]), member(X2, ...


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:- use_module(library(clpfd)). jump(X0/Y0, X/Y) :- abs(X0-X)+abs(Y0-Y)#=3, X0 #\= X, Y0 #\= Y, [X0,Y0,X,Y]ins 1..8.



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