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6

In fact, it is easier to do an induction on the SubSet judgment directly. However, you need to be as general as possible, so here is my advice: Lemma proof1: forall (A:Type) (x:A) (l1 l2:list A), SubSeq l1 l2 -> InL x l1 -> InL x l2. (* first introduce your hypothesis, but put back x and In foo inside the goal, so that your induction hypothesis ...


5

Several American proof assistants were mentioned already (usually with LISP syntax), so here is a Europe-centric list to complement that: Coq Isabelle HOL4 HOL-Light Mizar All of them are notorious for TTY interfaces, but Coq and Isabelle provide good support for the Proof General / Emacs interface. Moreover, Coq comes with CoqIDE, which is based on ...


4

ACL2 is notorious -- we used to say it was an expert system, and so could only be used by experts, who had to learn from Warren Hunt, J Moore, or Bob Boyer. The thing you need to do in ACL2 is really really understand how the proof system itself works; then you can "hint" it in directions that reduce the search space. There are several other systems that ...


4

A product is the special case of a dependent sum precisely when the dependent sum is isomorphic to the common product type. Consider the traditional summation of a series whose terms do not depend on the index: the summation of a series of n terms, all of which are x. Since x does not depend upon the index, usually denoted i, we simplify this to n*x. ...


4

As a matter of fact, the type prod is more akin to sigT than sig: Inductive prod (A B : Type) : Type := pair : A -> B -> A * B Inductive sig (A : Type) (P : A -> Prop) : Type := exist : forall x : A, P x -> sig P Inductive sigT (A : Type) (P : A -> Type) : Type := existT : forall x : A, P x -> sigT P From a meta-theoretic point ...


3

As mentioned, to prove that F <=> G where both are closed (universally quantified) formulas, you need to prove F => G and also G => F. To prove each of these two formulas, you can use various calculi. I'll describe [resolution calculus]: Negate the conjecture, so F => G becomes F & -G. Convert to CNF. Run resolution procedure. If you derive an empty ...


2

There are several people doing things along those lines. Look through the papers at John Rushbie's PVS site, and look at Coq's papers. Searching Citeseer will probably do some good too — almost everyone nowadays publishes their preprints to Citeseer, so a little looking around will usually get you the same paper, or something very very similar to the paper ...


2

There's ongoing research in this area, it's called "Theorem proving in computer algebra". People are trying to merge the ease of use and power of computer algebra systems like Mathematica, Maple, ... with the logical rigor of proof systems. The problems are: Computer algebra systems are not rigorous. They tend to forget side conditions such as that a ...


2

The structure of your deduction is reasonable, but there are steps missing to take you from the quantified statements to a particular and then back to quantified. It is not correct to say that P-->Q is "equivalent" to the first premise: that's misrepresenting a predicate statement as a propositional statements. What you can say is that if the first ...


1

If you want the shortest (shallowest) proof, which in this case uses disjunction introduction and avoids conjunction introduction, then you can look at techniques like iterative deepening. For instance you could change your code as follows: let rec prove n goal = if n=0 then failwith "No proof found" else let rule = get_rule goal in let sub-goals ...


1

The Archive of Formal Proofs has several entries in the category "Process Calculi" listed in its topics, such as CCS and Pi Calculus.


1

Ah, there is a proof of soundness for the process calculus underlying the Pict programming language in David N.Turner's thesis.


1

In addition to what Charlie Martin's links, you may also want to check out Maple. My experience with such software is about 5 years old, but I recall at the time finding Maple to be much more intuitive than Mathematica.



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