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So we have: Backtrack(list, matrix): if(matrix is complete) //O(1) return true from the list of m*n pieces, make a list of candidatePieces to put in the matrix. // O(m*n) for every candidatePiece // Worst case of n*m calls Put that piece in the matrix // O(1) if(Backtrack(list, matrix) is true) return true We assume ...


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If you unwind your formula, you'll get T(n*m) = T(n*m-1)+O(n*m) = T(n*m-2)+O(n*m-1) + O(n*m) = ... = O(n*m) + O(n*m-1) + O(n*m-2) +... + O(1) => ~ O(n^2*m^2) But I wonder is that algorithm complete? It does not seem to return false at all.


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I completely agree to Manuel, that just importing Main is not sufficient. If you're not interested in proofs, but just on testing irrationality then a good possibility would be to include $AFP/Real_Impl/Real_Impl from the Archive of Formal Proofs: then testing irrationality becomes very easy: theory Test imports "$AFP/Real_Impl/Real_Impl" begin lemma "sqrt ...


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Your guess that you have to wrap the “theorem” command in a theory in the way you did is correct. However, you need a few more imports, imports Main does not even load the theories containing sqrt, rational numbers, and prime numbers. Moreover, the proof on Wikipedia is somewhat outdated. Isabelle is a very dynamic system; its maintainers port all the ...


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While I cannot offer a proof, JS has no distinction between an integer and a float. The only difference between parseFloat and parseInt is how they interpret things like decimal points. If the input string is a valid integer in regular notation, though (as the first assertion asserts), they will always result in the same numeric value, which in JS means ...


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It actually can fail only with this input: testProof("NaN"); But if you really know it's an integer, why the test? Also parseFloat can't be a good replacement for parseInt as in lots of cases you don't know if it's really an integer and not a float.



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