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You don't. If Android can read the resources to be able to use them when running, other tools can read the resources for static analysis.


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The recommended way by Google is to do a reverse dns lookup (gethostbyaddr) in order to get the associated host name AND then resolve that name to an IP (gethostbyname) and compare it to the remote_addr (because reverse lookups can be faked, too). But beware, end lokups take time and can severely slow down your webpage (maybe check for user agent first). ...


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In addition to Cristian's answer: function is_valid_google_ip($ip) { $hostname = gethostbyaddr($ip); //"crawl-66-249-66-1.googlebot.com" return preg_match('/\.googlebot|google\.com$/i', $hostname); } function is_valid_google_request($ip=null,$agent=null){ if(is_null($ip)){ $ip=$_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']; } if(is_null($agent)){ ...


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The hosting provider doesn't know or care whether the client has JavaScript or not. What's happening here is that the hosting provider is serving a page that requires JavaScript for some reason, instead of the content that you're expecting (from your PHP script). I would suggest dumping out the returned HTML blob to a file and opening it in a web browser ...


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Your angular files are client side javascript files, which is accessible by all browsers. You can try and uglify your code to obfuscate it but it does not stop users from accessing it.


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If you want to stop flooding a search page you can try it like this way: $flood_protection_interval = 2; session_start(); if( isset($_SESSION['ip']) && $_SESSION['counter'] > 10 && $_SESSION['last_post'] + $flood_protection_interval > time() ){ // $_SESSION['counter'] = 0; // Use this if you want to reset ...



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