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0

You need to run the proto compiler to generate C++ code specific to your protobuf schema (which you seem to have done), and then compile and link that code, too! There should be something like a Point.pb.o file somewhere. There isn't a single, fixed library that provides code for all future message types. The public library only contains the common code for ...


0

It is not clear what is the exact requirement. But I assume you are trying to send different types of messages and the the receiver should be able to parse the correct object out of the received bytes. This can be done as shown in the example below: message Message1 { required string a = 1; required string b = 2; } message Message2 { required ...


1

Looks like you are using incompatible protostuff-core and protostuff-maven-plugin versions. Starting from version 1.1, protostuff uses package io.protostuff instead of com.dyuproject.protostuff. Protostuff dependency version and protostuff maven plugin version should be equal (1.3.5 is the latest version). Here is an example of maven project that uses ...


1

You cannot get a byte[] from a ByteString without copying because this would allow you to modify the contents of the ByteString, which means that ByteString could no longer guarantee that it is immutable. This is much like why you cannot get a char[] from a String without copying, even though String is actually backed by char[] under the hood. This can be a ...


0

Scan scan1 = constructScanObjectForUsers("A"); String json = scan1.toJSON(); Scan scan2 = convertStringToScan(Base64.encodeBytes(json.getBytes())); Here you appear to be encoding the message as JSON. Then you are applying base64 to the JSON text. Usually base64 only applies to binary, but JSON is text. byte[] decoded = Base64.decode(base64); // ...


0

turns out i have to multiple things: i have to duplicate the entire protobuf include folder (the one with all the headers) to my project. and then include them in my LOCAL_EXPORT_C_INCLUDES also, the command that i was using to do ndk-build is also not fully correct. it was missing a ton of stl stuff, like missing "string" or vector or map. so i used this ...


2

In general that is impossible because there could be no such array inside some subclasses of ByteString. BoundedByteString can contain a bigger array, so copying is required to get an array of the right size. RopeByteString consists of other byte strings so copying is required to put it contents into one array. LiteralByteString stores it contents in an ...


1

For some data types yes it will work, I'm doing this exact same thing right now (writing a surrogate for a Unity3D transform). Earlier, I tested on a MeshSurrogate. Here is how the code starts... [ProtoContract(AsReferenceDefault = true)] [ProtoSurrogate(typeof(Mesh))] sealed class MeshSurrogate { [ProtoMember(1)] Matrix4x4[] ...


1

The protoc --version has to be the same version to as set in pom.xml file (protobuf-java-2.5.0.jar).


0

You should prefix the protobuf with its size, and then add zeros to the end of the packet to get it to 1010 bytes. On the receiving end, you first read the size and then you parse the message using e.g. ParseFromArray() passing that size rather than the full packet size. You can simply encode the size as two bytes, or you can use the semi-standard protobuf ...


4

== compares object references, it checks to see if the two operands point to the same object (not equivalent objects, the same object), so you can be sure that .build() makes a new object each time... To use the code you posted you must compare with equals System.out.println(aBuilder.build().equals(aBuilder.build()));


3

In Java, you need to compare objects with the equals method, not with the == operator. The problem is that == compares if it is the same object, whereas the equals method compares if they are equal with the provided implementation by the developer of the class. System.out.println(aBuilder.build().equals(aBuilder.build())); For more details, there are ...


0

As with almost everything in engineering, my answer is... "it depends." Both are well tested, vetted technologies. Both will take your data and turn it into something friendly for sending someplace. Both will probably be fast enough, and if you're really counting a byte here or there, you're probably not going to be happy with either (let's face it both ...


0

Try something like this: SET(args PROTOFILES proto_file.proto OUTPATH ${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR} ) protobuf_generate_cpp( PROTO_SRCS PROTO_HDRS ${args})


0

Presumably these lines: var dec = builder.build("Game"); var msg = dec.decode(messagegpb); Need to be: var Game = builder.build("Game"); var msg = Game.Cars.Car.decode(messagegpb); That is, you need to specify what type you're decoding. Probably your attempt to call dec.decode was throwing an exception saying the decode method didn't exist. You should ...


0

You should not try to store a Protobuf in a wstring. wstring is for storing unicode text, but a protobuf is not unicode text nor any other kind of text, it is raw bytes. You should keep in in byte form. If you really need to store a Protobuf in a textual context, you should base64-encode it first. Arguably Protobufs' use of std::string to store bytes ...


0

There is no problem storing NUL bytes in std::strings. You can just assign the string normally. Both of your code snippets should work fine. The problem comes if you ever call .c_str() and try to pass the string to something expecting const char*. At this point, the receiver of the const char* doesn't know the size of the string so assumes it ends at the ...


1

std::string result(message.SerializeAsString(), size); when you are creating the temporary string std::string(message.SerializeAsString()) This part consumes the embedded nulls.


0

getAllFields() is part of Protobuf's reflection interface (not to be confused with Java's reflection). Protobuf reflection is, alas, quite slow -- it's essentially like using an interpreted language rather than a compiled one. If you need your code to be fast, the way to do it is to call the generated-code methods directly. Unfortunately this can be tedious ...


0

From JQuery's documentation on ajax (http://api.jquery.com/jquery.ajax/): Note: The W3C XMLHttpRequest specification dictates that the charset is always UTF-8; specifying another charset will not force the browser to change the encoding. You're probably trying to send raw binary bytes from your protobuffer, which is not compatible with UTF-8. I'm not ...


0

I think not: Protobuf is a binary format. So then you would need to support a text format like XML or JSON and Protobuf. Also it does not seem you would benefit from Protobufs better berformance at all.


-2

More of a guess, I am new to protobuf myself and it's tricky. Is com.google.protobuf... or anything on the classpath too? It sounds like you may have included only the generated files.


1

As of version 2.6.1, C++ protobuf compiler generates only copy constructors and copy assignment operators. But if your compiler supports return value optimization (and the conditions for it are satisfied) the copy constructor won't be called anyway. You can add some printing statements into generated code of your messages' copy constructors to see if they ...


0

the protobuf source code is compiled as c++ in xcode, here is my settings: Apple LLVM 6.0 - Language: C Language Dialect GNU99 [-std=gnu99] Compile Source As According To File Type Apple LLVM 6.0 Language - C++: C++ Language Dialect GNU++[-std=gnu++11] C++ standard Library libc++(LLVM C++ standard library with c++11 support) here is the ...


0

EDIT: I misunderstood the original question. To check what you're sending, you can use util.inspect(settings.data) to return a string that displays the contents of that variable or use console.dir(settings.data) to display that string implicitly to stdout (console.dir() uses util.inspect() behind the scenes). Original answer: I believe that protocol ...


0

There is no recognized "best practice" here. I have seen plenty of examples of both, and even written programs that worked both ways. Some people have very strong opinions about this, but in my opinion it depends on the use case. For example, as you say, if you plan to forward most of the data to another server, then it makes a lot of sense to keep the ...


1

Declaring nested types in Protocol Buffers is like declaring nested classes in C++ or static inner classes in Java. This simply declares a new type; it does not add a field to the outer type. So, in your proto schema, Foo is a completely empty message -- it has no fields. This is true regardless of which programming language you're working in. Probably what ...


0

Apple actually recommends that you don't use Reachability if you can avoid it, but just make the call and check the result. Before the call, you can set allowsCellularAccess to NO to avoid expensive 3G connections. Obviously you will get errors. In the special case where 3G was possible but not allowed, and there was no WiFi, you get ...


1

memoizedHashCode is defined in the base class AbstractMessageLite, which is part of the protobuf library. You need to make sure that the version of protoc that you are using to generate the code exactly matches the version of libprotobuf.jar that you are bringing into your program. If the versions do not match, you can see the error you describe, as well as ...


0

My reasoning is as follows: Since required is obsolete, then everything is optional. Thus there is no reason for explicit keyword. The following paragraph from language guide indicates how values are initialized if not set: Note that for scalar message fields, once a message is parsed there's no way of telling whether a field was explicitly set to ...


0

It seems that no blocking code is generated by protoc so i had to use self-made blocking: bool callbackFired = false; void myCallback() { // ... callbackFired = true; } // run service method service->myMethod(rpcController, request, response, NewCallback(&myCallback)); // block the thread until callback is invoked while (!callbackFired); ...


0

Just sticking this here in case it's useful: I searched around a lot for a generic way to do something similar to jeff wang's answer. I couldn't find anything so I wrote this. Let me know if you have any way to get rid of the unchecked cast in there... ProtobufRequest.java public class ProtoBufRequest<ReqT extends Message, RespT extends Message> ...


0

I suspect this is a C++ ABI issue. The ABI for std::string has changed in GCC 5 (related to C++11 requirements, but it applies even if you aren't using C++11). See: https://gcc.gnu.org/gcc-5/changes.html#libstdcxx If libprotobuf was built with GCC 4.x or prior, but your app is built with GCC 5, then you will see problems, because libprotobuf uses ...


2

After couple attempts, I found the setattr() and getattr() can workaround this. Because in my production code, the 'from' refers to another protobuff definition. So the solution here is as below: foo = Foo() object = getattr(foo, 'from') object.bar = 'value' object.bar2 = 'value2'


2

It is likely a bug; although the client does do some sleeps, there is no reason it should hang. I can't reproduce the problem though. The exception on the server-side may be related, since generally the client would do a graceful shutdown which would not produce that exception. However, if a client did ungracefully shut down the connection, then you would ...


0

This error appeared for me due to authentication errors. Once I fixed this, the error went away.


-1

The way you do this is to provide your own subclass of InstallService that overrides the methods you want to implement: struct MyInstallService : public InstallService { void getWifiNetworks(::google::protobuf::RpcController* controller, const ::WifiRequest* request, ::WifiResponse* response, ...


3

Nothing, really; they are equivalent. The {} syntax is used when there are options. If you don't specify any options, either syntax works (just like in C!).


1

protoc-gen-go needs to be in your shell path, i.e. one of the directories listed in the PATH environment variable, which is different from the Go path. You can test this by simply typing protoc-gen-go at the command line: If it says "command not found" (or similar) then it's not in your PATH.


2

Yes, it will work. The Protobuf encoding is completely independent of architecture.


1

The layer is summing up -log(p_i) and so the p_i's need to be in (0, 1] to make sense as a loss function (otherwise higher confidence scores will produce a higher loss). See the curve below for the values of log(p). I don't think they have to sum up to 1, but passing them through a Softmax layer will achieve both properties.



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