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1

You need to cast self.fetchedResultsController?.sections to an Array of NSFetchedResultsSectionInfo objects: if let s = self.fetchedResultsController?.sections as? [NSFetchedResultsSectionInfo] Then you can pass the section to the subscript and get the number of objects: if let s = self.fetchedResultsController?.sections as? [NSFetchedResultsSectionInfo] ...


1

Generally speaking, the protocol tag isn't required, protocol names are first-class type names and can be used directly: typealias Storage = [String:Equatable] In this case, what the error is telling you is that because Equatable includes func == (lhs:Self, rhs:Self) -> Bool and specifically lhs:Self, Equatable can't be used except as a constraint on a ...


0

Answer to the question 1: with the statement @interface DiffClass: SomeClass<SomeDelegate> The DiffClass inherits from SomeClass and also conforms the protocol(interface) SomeDelegate. Answer to the question 2: In Objc you can inherit only from one parent class (multiple inheritance wont be supported) but you can conform as many as protocols ...


0

To answer your first question, DiffClass does inherit from SomeClass as you have it written. But it doesn't need to inherit from SomeClass. I'll be a bit more thorough below. A protocol is a declaration of methods (and properties) that a class adopts. It does not have to be related to a class, although it often is for the delegation pattern. For example, ...


0

In practice, your code would be very strange. First, you don't have a class with a protocol. You have a protocol named SomeDelegate. Then you have a class SomeClass, which is unrelated to the protocol. Well, it has an instance variable that supports SomeDelegate, but that has nothing to do with the protocol. Then you create a class that is both a subclass ...


3

The error you're getting makes sense because Swift can know at compile time that Bear doesn't implement cough() (whereas Objective-C wouldn't necessarily be able to know that). To make your code compile, you need to define bear using the Bearable protocol instead of the Bear class. var bear: Bearable? Which is probably what you'd want anyway. ...


1

XPath defines a data model, which is a tree representation of XML, and the semantics of XPath expressions are defined in relation to this data model. In XPath 1.0 the model is part of the XPath spec; in 2.0 it's a separate specification called XDM. It's similar to the DOM but not quite the same; for example in DOM namespaces are accessible as attribute nodes ...


1

XPath and DOM are both ways of working with the structure of an XML document. The W3C have formalised this structure under the name XML Infoset, representing the information contained by an XML document independent of how that document is currently represented. XML, with all its < and > is the primary representation of that Infoset for transmission, ...


0

When you say "the actual XML", do you mean the sequence of characters, as opposed to a tree structure in memory after the sequence of characters is parsed? XPath operates on the tree structure of a parsed XML (or HTML) document. This is what the sentences you quoted are referring to when they say "an XML document." DOM (Document Object Model) is one type ...


0

This is not an answer, but I did spot a compile error in your 'swift stub', Human should be defined as follows: class Human:Humanizable { var name:String = "Frank" var language:Language = .English } You were trying to create an enum instance from a string literal. I am a little surprised that protocol conformance checking requires @obj - that's just ...


0

Also, it is important to copy all the non optional functions from the Delegate class. Cmd + Click on the UITableViewDatasource and copy those two definitions as is. For me in beta7, the UITableViewDatasource has func tableView(tableView: UITableView, numberOfRowsInSection section: Int) -> Int func tableView(tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAtIndexPath ...


3

viewForValue is supposed to return a class which inherits from UIView and implements SomeProtocol. You have defined 2 classes having no direct relationship - they just inherit from UIView and implement SomeProtocol. When the function has to determine the return type, the direct concrete type both classes inherit from is UIView, so that is what viewForValue ...


1

You can do it like this: protocol SomeProtocol { func someMethodInSomeProtocol() } class SomeType { } class SomeOtherType: SomeType, SomeProtocol { func someMethodInSomeProtocol() { } } class SomeOtherOtherType: SomeType, SomeProtocol { func someMethodInSomeProtocol() { } } func someMethod<T: SomeType where T: SomeProtocol>(condition: Bool) ...


5

You need to implement the Printable protocol: This protocol should be adopted by types that wish to customize their textual representation. This textual representation is used when objects are written to an OutputStreamType. protocol Printable { var description: String { get } } There's also the DebugPrintable protocol when it's only for ...


0

MVC architecture would do at application architecture level. If you want desktop Java, use RMI it has a protocol and RMi server implemented.


0

I really enjoy Marionette - I think it has a great system of organization that Backbone kind of leaves up to you to create yourself. backbonerails.com gives a really, really good overview/tutorial (albeit the backend is in rails, but it's just a RESTful backend for the most part). I feel that Backbone Marionnette gives you great controls over form fields ...


1

I found the solution to this issue here: http://lesstroud.com/dynamic-dispatch-with-nsmanaged-in-swift/ Essentially, this is a quirk of Swift when implementing protocols on Objects that are NSManaged. I had to add the dynamic keyword to my @NSManaged properties in the CurrentUser class, so that the class looked like this: class CurrentUser: ...


3

You can do this with a generic class using a where clause: A where clause enables you to require that an associated type conforms to a certain protocol, and/or that certain type parameters and associated types be the same. To use it, make the class your property is defined in a generic class with a type constraint to check if the type parameter for ...


0

This is a frequently asked question about Twisted. The simplest solution is to make a connections list on PrimeClientFactory and do self.factory.connections.append(self) in connectionMade and self.factory.connections.remove(self) in connectionLost on PrimeProtocol. (Also, ClientFactory and connectTCP are somewhat outdated ways of doing this, you should ...


1

You can maintain a global dict/list to hold connections, and add/remove connection to/from it in connectionMade()/connectionLost(). Or you may use ClientCreator for convienence


1

I'm experiencing the same problem, and have narrowed down to the issue to the protocol being defined as a Class-Only Protocol (i.e. protocol XXX: class). protocol FooProtocol { var name: String { get } } // Note: Class-Only protocol protocol BarProtocol: class { var name: String { get } } class Foo: FooProtocol { let name: String = "Foo" ...


0

So, I can't speak to why it behaves like this, but I did find a workaround. Try this: aString = { return a.someFunc() }


0

PHP Implementation: function encode($message) { $length = strlen($message); $bytesHeader = []; $bytesHeader[0] = 129; // 0x1 text frame (FIN + opcode) if ($length <= 125) { $bytesHeader[1] = $length; } else if ($length >= 126 && $length <= 65535) { $bytesHeader[1] = 126; ...


1

Yes. Type out something in the standard library, like IntegerLiteralConvertible or Equatable, and command+click on it (or go to File → Open Quickly, type the same thing and open its definition file). This file, the Swift standard library header, contains all the functions, classes, structs, enums and protocols from the Swift standard library. Note that ...


5

Protocol inheritance uses the regular inheritance syntax in Swift. protocol Base { func someFunc() } protocol Extended : Base { func anotherFunc() } Swift Protocols do not by default conform to NSObjectProtocol. If you do choose to have your protocol conform to NSObjectProtocol, you will limit your protocol to only being used with classes.


4

The syntax is the same as if you were declaring a class that inherited from a superclass. protocol SomeProtocol { } protocol SomeOtherProtocol: SomeProtocol { } And no, they do not. If you want your protocol to conform to NSObjectProtocol as well, you can supply multiple protocols for your new protocol to conform to like this. protocol ...


1

What you're looking for is an inner class (not necessarily an anonymous one), declared in a scope that lets it access the count variable of a MyClass instance, and that adopts a protocol defined at a different scope. Right now Swift has a few of those pieces, but it doesn't look like you can put them all together in any way that's as concise as what you ...


3

You need a little more code than that. You will get an AnyClass and not an AnyObject. So you need to create an instance of that type. You could try this: let cellClass: AnyClass! = NSClassFromString("MyCell") var objectType : NSObject.Type! = cellClass as NSObject.Type! var theObject: NSObject! = objectType() as NSObject var myCell:MyCell = theObject as ...


0

In first place you donĀ“t have to set the Accept-Language attribute. You only have to parse the HTTP response and get Content-Language. It should have the values for all the languages that the content is intended. If no Content-Language is specified, the default is that the content is intended for all language audiences. This might mean that the sender does ...


2

Here is an example class class Foo: Printable, DebugPrintable { var description: String { return "Foo" } var debugDescription: String { return "debug Foo" } } This is how to use it. println(Foo()) debugPrintln(Foo()) Here is the output with no surprises: Foo debug Foo I didn't try this in a Playground. It works in an ...


1

I believe the main difference is the property that's used to print. Printable has description and DebugPrintable has debugDescription: http://stackoverflow.com/a/24254220/887210 https://developer.apple.com/library/prerelease/ios/documentation/General/Reference/SwiftStandardLibraryReference/Printable.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40014608-CH11-SW1 Edit: ...


9

As XCode6-Beta7 releases, I noticed the protocol method of UITableViewDataSource changed a little bit and sounded the same conform to protocol error which worked fine in beta6. These are the required methods to be implemented according to the UITableViewDataSource protocol: func tableView(tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAtIndexPath indexPath: ...


0

If you look at the TCP/IP state diagram, FIN_WAIT_2 transitions into TIME_WAIT. So I would imagine that Linux simply transitions when FIN_WAIT_2 times out when the FIN does not arrive.


0

Selvin was correct. User Agent had to be changed to an existing User Agent String.


0

As of today, the best way I found to solve this problem on a Mac with the least overhead is using the command line duti which allows me to define in a very simple text file all my associations: brew install duti You will need two things. First bundle ids of the Apps you want to associate: mdls -name kMDItemCFBundleIdentifier ...


0

This is a bad question and I do not see any effort from your part. Please check how to pose a question: http://stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-ask Assuming you only need to support Web Browsers that support HTML5 then try WebRTC (http://www.webrtc.org/home) WebRTC is a free, open project that enables web browsers with Real-Time Communications (RTC) ...


0

First, a note: Your names for view controllers should include "ViewController" in the name. There is an entirely different collection of classes that inherit from UIView. Naming a View Controller just ViewA makes it look like your class is just a view instead of a view controller. Views are in an entirely different layer of your application. Now, to pass ...


-1

Ignoring the optional binding for a moment and using a direct assignment: let x = ps as [X] the following runtime error is reported: fatal error: array element cannot be bridged to Objective-C That means the downcast from array of protocols to array of adopters requires obj-c binding. This can be easily solved by declaring the protocol as objc ...


0

Oh no, oh no, don't use delegates here! You should use delegate pattern only if you are notifying a containing object of the happening of a particular event. If your containing object cannot handle the happening of a particular event, you "delegate" the task to whoever CAN take care of it. What you are looking at now is a straightforward object ...


1

If it is a CRC, then reveng may be able to deduce the parameters of the CRC, given enough examples.


0

MyFrameworkClass *client = [MyFrameworkClass alloc] initWithDelegate:self]; Even if you correct the code above to have the correct number of left brackets ([), you cannot use self in your main() function because main() is a function, not a method of some object. If you need a delegate for MyFrameworkClass, you'll need to first create one, like: ...


1

CURLOPT_REDIR_PROTOCOLS is a bitmask you set to tell libcurl which protocols to allow a redirect to. The redirect can in fact only be received over HTTP. A redirect is an instruction set from the server to instead try the request on a different URL. SFTP has no redirection feature so there's no point for you to set this bitmask as long as you don't use ...


0

It is dependent on the bowers and server. won't need to change any program to adopt HTTP 2.0.


0

I think the issue is that operator requirements and instance method requirements are different, even though they syntactically look similar. Operators are always defined at the global level, so an operator requirement is a requirement on an operator at the global level. On the other hand, instance method requirements are requirements on instance methods. ...


1

They both serialize a simple list of key-value items. SCGI uses a text format for it while uwsgi (lowercase for the protocol) uses a binary encoding where each string is prefixed with a 16bit size: http://uwsgi-docs.readthedocs.org/en/latest/Protocol.html


1

Your MathematicType protocol, and your declarations of conformance to it in Float and Double extensions, say that Float and Double should provide sin as an instance method. That is, you're saying one should be able to write code like: let zero = 0.0 // inferred type Double zero.sin(1.5707963268) // returns about 1.0 Notice that invocation of sin isn't ...


2

The compiler error is because you declared sin() as a method of the MathematicType protocol, and then declared that Double implements MathematicType, but didn't actually write the sin() method. extension Double { func sin(x: Double) -> Double { return Darwin.sin(x) } } I don't think that's what you want, though, is it? You want to be ...


2

It's very easy, looking at URLs like these, to apply your human knowledge of what they probably mean, rather than the much simpler rules implemented by software like web browsers. The simplest type of URL (or more accurately URI, since some schemes don't represent a Location, only an Identifier) is absolute; it starts with a scheme, then a colon, and no ...



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