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747

Quick answer: A child scope normally prototypically inherits from its parent scope, but not always. One exception to this rule is a directive with scope: { ... } -- this creates an "isolate" scope that does not prototypically inherit. This construct is often used when creating a "reusable component" directive. As for the nuances, scope inheritance is ...


105

prototype is a property of a Function object. It is the prototype of objects constructed by that function. __proto__ is internal property of an object, pointing to its prototype. Current standards provide an equivalent Object.getPrototypeOf(O) method, though de facto standard __proto__ is quicker. You can find instanceof relationships by comparing a ...


91

__proto__ is the actual object that is used in the lookup chain to resolve methods, etc. prototype is the object that is used to build __proto__ when you create an object with new: ( new Foo ).__proto__ === Foo.prototype ( new Foo ).prototype === undefined


33

The problem is that Inventory.prototype.defaults and Extended.prototype.defaults has the same reference, because you have not override the reference. So you can do this in 2 ways, maybe more but i only found this 2: Edit: The first example is incorrect (see comments); please refer to the second. var ExtendedInventory = Inventory.extend({ defaults: { ...


28

As mentioned, the movies by Douglas Crockford give a good explanation about the why and it convers the how. But to put it in a couple of lines of JavaScript: // Declaring our Animal object var Animal = function () { this.name = 'unknown'; this.getName = function () { return this.name; } return this; }; // Declaring our Dog object ...


26

1) Object.create() starts out by creating an empty function called F. I'm thinking that a function is a kind of object. Where is this F object being stored? Globally I guess. No, it's stored on the local scope of the Object.create function, each time you invoke Object.create this function F will be recreated. You could even create a more ...


25

The JavaScript object oriented paradigm is prototype based. There are no "classes", just objects. You can implement inheritance in different ways. The two more popular alternatives are the "pseudo-classical" and the "prototypal" forms. For example: Pseudo-classical inheritance I think this is the most popular way. You create constructor functions that you ...


24

Is there any practical difference [between my examples]? The user may have a JavaScript object created with Object.create(null), which will have a null [[Prototype]] chain, and therefore won't have hasOwnProperty() available on it. Using your second form would fail to work for this reason. It's also a safer reference to ...


23

Douglas Crockford has a nice page on JavaScript Prototypal Inheritance: Five years ago I wrote Classical Inheritance in JavaScript. It showed that JavaScript is a class-free, prototypal language, and that it has sufficient expressive power to simulate a classical system. My programming style has evolved since then, as any good programmer's should. I have ...


22

I don't think the constructor/factory logic is necessary at all, as long as you change how you think about Object-Oriented Programming. In my recent exploration of the topic, I've discovered that Prototypical inheritance lends itself more to defining a set of functions that use particular data. This isn't a foreign concept to those trained in classical ...


18

Does C# 4.0's ExpandoObject support Prototype-based inheritance? First off, note that the ExpandoObject class has nothing whatsoever to do with C# 4.0. The C# team did not design or implement this object. C# 4.0 and the ExpandoObject class merely happen to both ship with the latest version of .NET. To answer your question I refer you to the ...


18

Protoype property is created when a function is declared. For instance: function Person(dob){ this.dob = dob }; Person.prototype property is created internally once you declare above function. Many properties can be added to the Person.prototype which are shared by Person instances created using new Person(). Person.prototype.age = ...


15

First off, the ability to override via constructor was added in a later version of Ext than initComponent, so all code of a certain age would have to use initComponent. These days, you would still override initComponent if you want to do anything after the base class initComponent is called (constructor would be too early for this), but before the component ...


15

Does that mean I shouldn't use John Resig's code? Not with ES5 and strict mode, yes. However, it can be easily adapted: /* Simple JavaScript Inheritance for ES 5.1 * based on http://ejohn.org/blog/simple-javascript-inheritance/ * (inspired by base2 and Prototype) * MIT Licensed. */ (function(global) { "use strict"; var fnTest = ...


14

The reason is that using Hoozit.prototype = Gizmo.prototype would mean that modifying Hoozit's prototype object would also modify objects of type Gizmo, which is not expected behavior. Hoozit.prototype = new Gizmo() inherits from Gizmo, and then leaves Gizmo alone.


14

He probably meant The moment after doing this, the addMethod becomes available for all basic objects object types like String, Number etc. This is because the String object is a function (but objects created by String are not). E.g., given var s = ''; You can do String.addMethod(...); but not s.addMethod(...); A brief explanation of the JavaScript ...


14

There are several things that you can't emulate from the ECMAScript 5 Object.create method on an ECMAScript 3 environment. As you saw, the properties argument will give you problems since in E3-based implementations there is no way to change the property attributes. The Object.defineProperty method as @Raynos mentioned, works on IE8, but partially, it can ...


14

Constructor and protoypes in plain English? Constructor functions create objects and assign prototypes to them. A prototype is an object with various properties that an object can inherit through the prototype chain. As always, examples help: function Foo() { } Foo.prototype.answer = 42; var f = new Foo(); console.log(f.answer); // "42" Foo is a ...


13

The issue is that it's referring to the name of the constructor function. This quickly becomes a discussion about function expressions and statements and the name property. Turns out is is completely impossible to create a new named function at runtime without using eval. Names can only be specified using a function statement function fnName(){} and it's not ...


13

What you are experiencing is essentially a byproduct of the way JS passes objects (or arrays) by reference and not by value. If you want index to be different for User and Group, simply instantiate it as an array in your initialize function. var Base = Backbone.Model.extend({ initialize: function() { this.index = []; } });


12

Unless one of the designers of JavaScript stops by to weigh in, we can only speculate. That having been said, here's my take: JavaScript is executed as it is interpreted, so there is no concept of separating the declaration of an object's type from the object itself. It's a very functional approach. The instance is coming into existence as it is being ...


12

Backbone and jQuery solve different problems... Backbone essentially gives you a structure in order to make Javascript heavy apps... It gives you Models, Collections, Views and Controllers (although, based on only a day of playing with it, it feels to me like controllers are used for routing, and the views are kind of like a classic controller) Backbone has ...


12

I think the best way to solve it is to use underscore.js's _.defaults method. This will allow you to override default values in your Model subclass: _.defaults(ExtendedInventory.prototype.defaults, Inventory.prototype.defaults); See this example: http://jsfiddle.net/mattfreer/xLK5D/


12

You're running in to one of the limitations of JavaScript's this and prototypal inheritance, squarely because you're attempting to create a class-like inheritance scheme in a language that doesn't directly support it. Even with Backbone, you are generally discouraged from using "super" directly because of the limitations that you've outlined, and more. ...


12

When you extend an object, you change its behaviour. Changing the behaviour of an object that will only be used by your own code is fine. But when you change the behaviour of something that is also used by other code there is a risk you will break that other code. When it comes adding methods to the object and array classes in javascript, the risk of ...


11

I would take a look at YUI, and at Dean Edward's Base library: http://dean.edwards.name/weblog/2006/03/base/ For YUI you can take a quick look at the lang module, esp. the YAHOO.lang.extend method. And then, you can browse the source of some widgets or utilities and see how they use that method.


11

1) Why if all new objects contain a reference to the creator function's prototype, fido.prototype is undefined? All new objects do hold a reference to the prototype that was present on their constructor at the time of construction. However the property name used to store this reference is not prototype as it is on the constructor function itself. ...


11

2 years later: mutating anything in global scope is a terrible idea Original: There being something "wrong" with extending native prototypes is FUD in ES5 browsers. Object.defineProperty(String.prototype, "my_method", { value: function _my_method() { ... }, configurable: true, enumerable: false, writeable: true }); However if you have to support ...


11

The prototype is just another object to which an object has an implicit reference. When you do: var obj = Object.create( some_object ); ...you're saying that you want obj to try to fetch properties from some_object, when they don't exist on obj. As such, your second example would be closer to the way you'd use it. Every object that is created using ...


11

I in no way want to compete with Mark's answer, but just wanted to highlight the piece that finally made everything click as someone new to Javascript inheritance and its prototype chain. Only property reads search the prototype chain, not writes. So when you set myObject.prop = '123'; It doesn't look up the chain, but when you set ...



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