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5

Any JavaScript object has own and inherited properties. Own are those defined directly on the instance and inherited are taken from the prototype object. When using a property accessor, JavaScript first searches in object's own properties list. If the property is not found, it searches in object's prototype chain. In your example, the wrapper() method ...


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Lua is prototype-based. Technically, there is no class or inheritance or base class, super class in Lua. Lua has some tools like metatables to simulate classical OOP. The main reason that the PiL book uses these terms is to make it easier for the reader to understand. If you like the language-lawyer way of describing the syntax, read the reference manual, ...


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In the current declaration, the bar() function cannot be modified. It exists in the scope of foo() method and cannot be changed from outside. An alternative solution for a dynamic override could be: var Loader = function() {} Loader.prototype = { constructor: Loader, foo: function(a, b, barFun) { if (typeof barFun !== 'function') { ...


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document.querySelectorAll() returns NodeList which is an Array-like object. The problem is that NodeLists are read-only. You'd need to transform it in an array. Array.prototype.slice.call(document.querySelectorAll(query)); after that you'll be able to whatever you want.


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You have to check Document.querySelectorAll() documentation https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Document/querySelectorAll Returns a non-live NodeList of all the matching element nodes. NodeList are used very much like arrays and it's tempting to invoke Array.prototype methods on them, however NodeList objects don't have any of the familiar ...


2

In React, inheritance for components is severely discouraged. React is much better suited for expressing the same relationships via composition. Here is an example of using composition: class Button extends Component { render() { return ( <div className='Button' style={{ color: this.props.color }}> {this.props.children} ...


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The answer to your question is HTMLUnknownElement. It is a subclass of HTMLElement. var myApple = document.createElement('apple'); document.write(myApple.constructor.name); // "HTMLUnknownElement"


1

Let me see if I can explain: You have two separate versions of doABC here. Your target.doABC creates a function specific to that instance of your Model and each Model get its own doABC. Because Model has a doABC, the JavaScript engine has no need to look 'up the chain' for something else, hence it will never look for the Model.prototype.doABC version. ...


1

thisFunction is your constructor function. It does not have a .weather() method. So, thisFunction.weather is undefined and thisFunction.weather() is an error. The .weather() method is on the prototype which means its on instances of thisFunction, not on the constructor itself. So, in your code, you could do: g.weather() Or, inside of the .event() ...


1

The issue that you're having is that the argument to Object.create should be Car.prototype Here's working code var Car = function(x){ this.x = x; this.y = 10; }; var Van = function(x){ Car.apply(this, arguments); }; Van.prototype = Object.create(Car.prototype); Van.prototype.constructor = Car; Car.prototype.say_position = function(){ ...


1

Yes you can do this. However, you will have to create a private variable and then expose it through a public property by using object.defineProperty. You do have to be aware of browser compatibility issues with this. For example object.defineProperty was not supported until IE9. Example: var log = function(message) { ...


1

What about the following? I tested it, it works ;) var Dog = function() { this.tail = 1; this.print = function() { console.log(this.tail); }; }; or var Dog = function() { var tail = 1; this.print = function() { console.log(tail); }; }; There's just one difference: this.tail can be edited from the global scope, ...


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answer is not declared, so it cannot be used. You decided to use global vairables, so use them consistently. #include <iostream> #include <iomanip> #include <cstdlib> #include <fstream> #include <string> #include <cmath> using namespace std; double userNumber = 0; double calcNum_one = 0; double calcNum_two = 0; double ...


1

You need to create an instance of your object to use the prototype methods. var abc = new defineABC() abc.alert2(); abc.alert3(); so u can define it in your code like this if (typeof(ABC) === 'undefined') { window.ABC = new defineABC(); } You final code could look like this: (function (window) { 'use strict'; function ...


1

Lua has a prototype-based inheritance system. Let's first make sure we understand that Lua doesn't have classes and really every object is of the same type (table). To mimic the notion of a class, lua uses metatables to define a set of properties on the table that are not defined on the table itself. Two tables can share the same behavior, because we can ...



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