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2

You would have to bind the object to the function var app = new APP("ieps"); var testing = app.test.bind(app); console.log(testing()); http://jsbin.com/kiyiyutili/2/edit EDIT: From the MDN docs for .bind: "The bind() method creates a new function that, when called, has its this keyword set to the provided value, with a given sequence of arguments ...


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If you have a var that = this at the root of the Person scope that should take care of knowing what this you are referring to. function Person() { var self_person = this; self_person.siblings = { brothers: ["Adam", "Carl"], sisters: ["Betty", "Dorothy"] }; self_person.first_sister = function() { ...


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These days I do this kind of thing a lot for convenience, no trickery, just scope: function () { function _this() { return window.myObject; } window.myObject = { myMethod: function myMethod() { _this().myOtherMethod(); }, myOtherMethod: function myOtherMethod() { } } }();


1

There is very little difference. The only thing of note is that quite often, type checking (something which Javascript isn't great at when you try to simulate OOP) is done by checking the .constructor property. You test if (someone.constructor === Programmer). If you remove the Programmer.prototype.constructor = Programmer; line, then someone.constructor is ...


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The constructor property lives in the prototype object which in turn your object refers. when you modify the prototype object by doing this Programmer.prototype = new Person(); the constructor property stored in the actual prototype gets lost, because you are overwriting the prototype object itself. so this line Programmer.prototype.constructor = ...


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Does this work for you? You create an ObjectWrapperCreator which gives you a function back that you can then call, like: function ObjectWrapperCreator(prototype) { var wrapper = function(param) { prototype.param = param; var obj = Object(param); Object.setPrototypeOf(obj, prototype); obj.valueOf = function() { ...


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You may use this structure... //outer function is to provide support for multiple wrappers with different inheritance function PrimitiveWrapper(){ return function(x){ this.valueOf = function(){ return x; } }; }; var wrapper1 = PrimitiveWrapper(); wrapper1.prototype.p = 3; var w11 = new ...


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The Array.prototype.some() method returns a boolean value. This is a primitive value, not a "literal". You are correct that if p holds a boolean value then assigning properties like p.name will not work. (However, I believe it will only result in an exception if the code is running in strict mode otherwise the attempted assignment will fail silently.) ...


1

The problem is that areaPropDesc is an object which inherits from Object.prototype. Since you created the Object.prototype.x enumerable property, when you iterate objects using for...in you will see that property. To avoid that, you can Make x non-enumerable: Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'x', { value: 5, configurable: true, ...


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It's because the property descriptor is itself an object, so it has access to the "x" on the Object prototype just like all other objects in your environment. In other words, that "x" is not the "x" from your "rectangle" object.


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The extends keyword allows you to inherit an existing object. For example, let's say you have an Animal object: func Animal(name) { this.name = name; this.walk = func() { console.log('\(name) is walking...'); }; } Animal.prototype.getLegs = func() { return 4; }; You can now create another object that inherits Animal using the extends ...


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After ajax call getting successful message apply this code $("#form_id").trigger("reset"); Reference


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In case of check boxes or radio buttons remove the checked attribute like below $(this).removeAttr("checked"); This will fix your issue.


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There are many differents in the way of instantiating objects that are created and accessed from these functions. For example: function createFoo(){ var _foo = { id: 1 }; return _foo; } var foo = createFoo(); If you want to get value of id property, you have to iterate over properties in foo object, like this: for(var prop in foo){ //if you ...


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Running the code in the chrome console give us more information about the content of the 2 variables: > foo Object {id: 1} > foo2 Foo {id: 1} So there is a difference. Spoiler Alert !! The answer lies in the prototype chain: > foo.__proto__ Object {} > foo2.__proto__ Foo {} If you need more details, refer to this great post: ...


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After some thinking, I've decided to add another answer. After re-checking your posts and comments I have come up with this and I'm sure you'll accept this as the correct answer: [UPDATE: Added newJSSystemDate layer] // set up newJSSystemDate with complicated scoping magic var newJSSystemDate = (function(actualDateObject){ return function(newDate) { ...


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I'm not going to touch on replacing the date object constructor itself (if that's what you meant), but I think this is pretty much what you are looking to do: [EDITED - replaced date object constructor]: Date = (function(Date) { return function(y,m,d,h,min,s,mil) { var newDateObj; if(mil !== undefined) newDateObj = new ...


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If you have a <div> like this: <div id="mydate"></div> You could update it continuously like this: var mydate = new Date('01/01/2015 00:00:55'); var el = document.getElementById('mydate'); setInterval( function(){ mydate.setSeconds(mydate.getSeconds() + 1); el.innerText=mydate.toLocaleString(); } , 1000); Here is a fiddle.


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I am not sure whether this is what you want. function MyDate(year,month,day) { var date = new Date(); date.setFullYear(year); date.setMonth(month); date.setDate(day); return date; } var myDate = new MyDate(1990,04,10); console.log(myDate);


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Add to the prototype instead of redefining it: Blob.prototype.checkBorders = function() { ... }; Blob.prototype.iterate = function() { ... }; and don't forget the new keyword new instantiating new blob objects.


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Change the array filling to use new so that you create distinct objects blobs.push(new Blob(center, radius, points, vector)); You current code just executes the Blob function which returns nothing (undefined)


4

There is a subtle difference. In the first method, when you overwrite the prototype, there was a property there that is now lost. That's the constructor, which points back to your function. The constructor allows you to recreate the type of object that it is. You can easily get it back and so use the first method by manually setting it: ...


0

Extend Number.prototype. Numbers in Javascript are a data type that is associated with the built-in object "Number." Add the following polyfill block: if (!Number.prototype.round) { Number.prototype.round = function (decimals) { if (typeof decimals === 'undefined') { decimals = 0; } return Math.round( this ...


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Here's the solution I found: $$('.parent')[1].select('tbody > tr').last().down().... Problem was when there's more than one instance of .parent, a specific instance needs to be targeted, and last element could be a non UI element, like a <script> tag. This solution allows to target a specific instance using an index, in this case [1]and target ...


2

If Bread doesn't supply a constructor, thus using the generic function created in makeClass() Not exactly. properties.constructor, for which you test in your condition, will (almost) always have a value: It does inherit .constructor from Object.prototype. This will make your makeClass() call return the Object function, and sushi is indeed an instanceof ...


2

First of all, stop doing Child.prototype = new Parent(); for inheritance. That's a very bad style and can have undesired side effects, since it actually runs the constructor logic. You can use Object.create in every modern browser now. Child.prototype = Object.create(Parent.prototype); Next, how call works? Well call allows to specify which object will ...


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Agreed with looking into this, Function.prototype.bind, and also the prototype chain in general. Also, javascript is a dynamically bound language. You can re-bind this. you can either store a reference to this as a closure variable, or bind the function literal that you're passing to setTimeout to the context you want (Sensor.prototype or this in that ...


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Declare global method foo and sub-method bar and refer to sub-method as function in itself, you can use this keyword inside sub-method by addressing previously declared variable, and then declare the return variable as the sub-method process. Foo: function() { var a='a'; var ret='b'; var Bar = function() { this.a='a'; return ...


2

In your code "this" in setTimeout callback refers the parent function getSensorResult. That function doesn't have a function called getSensorReading. That's the reason for the error... Also as you are using global variables inside function unexpected results may occur by overbidding the variables. Make them global with var keyword. Try changing like this.. ...


1

A couple of things I would do here (working fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/z8upoccm/2/): 1.) It seems that the function is initializing on your jquery object as expected, but then again on regular DOM elements. Only allow jquery elements to pass through. Object.prototype.parallax = function(userOptions){ if(!this.jquery) return false; 2.) You need units on ...


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Prototype allows you add new properties and correct way of doing that will be: person.prototype.hair_color = "brown";


4

child.prototype = parent.prototype; is incorrect, for the reason you've detailed in your question. Using _.extend isn't want you want, either. Consider that a change in an "inherited" parent prototype property will not cause a change in the child: // perform extension _.extend(child.prototype, parent.prototype); // parent later gains new property after ...


3

B.prototype has a reference to the same object as A.prototype (line 12). On line 16 you stored a reference of this same object to C.prototype. This means all three prototypes point to the same object, therefore all changes made to A.prototype, B.prototype or C.prototype will actually change the same object. At the end of your code, this object has three ...


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Because it basically asks whether Object.prototype does inherit from Object's .prototype object: It does not. a instanceof b is equivalent to b.prototype.isPrototypeOf(a) - it tests whether b.prototype is in the prototype chain of a. In your case, it is not in the chain, because it is the start of the chain itself. isPrototypeOf is not reflexive.


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Referencing MDN: The instanceof operator tests whether an object has in its prototype chain the prototype property of a constructor.


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It's a completely empty object (nothing inherited from any .prototype inclusing Object.prototype), so you can be guaranteed that any property lookup will only succeed if the property was explicitly added to the object. For example, if you want to store some data where you won't know the keys in advance, there's a possibility that a provided key will have ...


0

When you use super in the way you do it'll break when inheritance is more than 2 levels. Assuming you'd use it the following way: //changed super to this.super since super is not shown to exist in global scope bar.prototype.func1(){ return this.one + this.super('func1'); } See the following example: function GrandFather(){ this.i = 0; }; ...


3

Question 1 new Bar().constructor.prototype should equal Object.getPrototypeOf(new Bar()), provided you haven't overrided Bar.prototype.constructor or Bar.prototype, or return a different object in the Bar constructor. Here's an example: function Bar() {} var foo = new Bar(); foo.constructor.prototype === Object.getPrototypeOf(foo); // true function Bar2() ...


0

oop in javascript is ugly. (at least until ES6 which supports the class and implements keywords) but even ES6 will not support multiple inheritance. I wrote a small class library (available on github) for javascript that makes creating classes and inheritance much easier to both develop and maintain. for example to create a class just do this: ...


0

As Jared (HJ05) indicated; there is a better way to attach event on elements. Since you want to fill a certain container (element with id output) with your html and respond to only events within the container it's better to attach a click handler on that container. Then use the event and event.target (the clicked element) together with data properties (in ...


2

Your problem has to do with scope and your understanding of prototypical programming. This is a very deep subject with lots of references online so I'm not going to do a full explanation here. Basically by adding properties to the prototype property means adding functionality to all instances of the object you are creating. When you output the html the ...


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The onClick link you are introducing is not calling the Outside instance you created earlier. I've updated the fiddle to place the out variable in global scope and then to have it referenced in the inserted link. http://jsfiddle.net/yrt3krn9/3/ I'd also recommend handling the event outside of the 'onClick' attribute. That is, create an event handler for ...


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Clicking a link causes a postback which resets the scope (clears any javascript code you have loaded). This is why you have to include the <script> tags in your page because every time it loads the javascript must be loaded. That said it is possible do do what you want. Most browsers support an Html5 feature called Local or Web Storage Go here for ...


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First, as mentioned in the comments, use filter instead of forEach here: function stripOutPremium(element, index, array) { if (element.is_premium === true) { var elementDescAdjustment = element.description; element.description = 'Premium content! ' + elementDescAdjustment.substr(0,15) + '...'; } return true; } return ...


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I think your best bet is to use Array.map(), and return a new version of the array: articles.map(function(element, index, array) { if (element.is_premium === true) { var elementDescAdjustment = element.description; element.description = 'Premium content! ' + elementDescAdjustment.substr(0,15) + '...'; } return element; });


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I use two very small functions for simplifying inheritance in JavaScript: function defclass(prototype) { var constructor = prototype.constructor; constructor.prototype = prototype; return constructor; } function extend(constructor, keys) { var prototype = Object.create(constructor.prototype); for (var key in keys) prototype[key] = ...


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The difference is where the property is defined, .name is defined on the actual newPerson object while .surname is defined on newPerson's prototype object. if you were to create 2 Person objects the two will share the same .surname property but each will have its own .name property. notice that once you assign a different value to .surname on an object ...


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Any properties assigned to the prototype are shared among all objects that use that prototype (since the prototype object itself is shared among all instances). This is great for functions on the prototype (e.g. methods), but it is usually bad for data properties because (as you have found), all instances share the same data properties which is not what you ...


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L-values and r-values In programming, there are two kinds of expressions: l-values ("l" for left) and r-values ("r" for right). An l-value is something that can be assigned to while an r-value is something that we can assign to something else. For example, say we had the following HTML <div id="my-div" style="background-color: blue;"></div> ...


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You can use, for example, Function.prototype.bind, which will return a function but with constant this value: window.requestAnimationFrame(slates.render.bind(slates)) or wrap this invocation into another function: window.requestAnimationFrame(function() { slates.render() })



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