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264

Both answers to this question so far are incorrect. For Linux the correct command is: gcc -pthread -o term term.c In general, libraries should follow sources and objects on command line, and -lpthread is not an "option", it's a library specification. On a system with only libpthread.a installed, gcc -lpthread ... will fail to link.


124

There is more than one way to define "memory leak". In particular, there are two primary definitions of "memory leak" that are in common usage among programmers. The first commonly used definition of "memory leak" is, "Memory was allocated and was not subsequently freed before the program terminated." However, many programmers (rightly) argue that certain ...


112

It's just the way that condition variables are (or were originally) implemented. The mutex is used to protect the condition variable itself. That's why you need it locked before you do a wait. The wait will "atomically" unlock the mutex, allowing others access to the condition variable (for signalling). Then when the condition variable is signalled or ...


89

Re-entrant locking A reentrant lock is one where a process can claim the lock multiple times without blocking on itself. It's useful in situations where it's not easy to keep track of whether you've already grabbed a lock. If a lock is non re-entrant you could grab the lock, then block when you go to grab it again, effectively deadlocking your own ...


83

You can't do it the way you've written it because C++ class member functions have a hidden this parameter passed in. pthread_create() has no idea what value of this to use, so if you try to get around the compiler by casting the method to a function pointer of the appropriate type, you'll get a segmetnation fault. You have to use a static class method ...


72

The following should be clean (using find_package) and work (the find module is called FindThreads): cmake_minimum_required (VERSION 2.6) find_package (Threads) add_executable (myapp main.cpp ...) target_link_libraries (myapp ${CMAKE_THREAD_LIBS_INIT})


71

If you do not lock the mutex in the codepath that changes the condition and signals, you can lose wakeups. Consider this pair of processes: Process A: pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex); while (condition == FALSE) pthread_cond_wait(&cond, &mutex); pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex); Process B (incorrect): condition = TRUE; ...


62

There are many examples included in the distribution and available on github: https://github.com/krakjoe/pthreads/tree/master/examples These examples include such things as a general purpose thread pool, a multi-threaded socket server and an SQLWorker. The Threads pthreads creates are as sane, and as safe, as the threads that Zend itself sets up to ...


61

Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deadlock: A livelock is similar to a deadlock, except that the states of the processes involved in the livelock constantly change with regard to one another, none progressing. Livelock is a special case of resource starvation; the general definition only states that a specific process is not ...


59

As of glibc v2.12, you can use pthread_setname_np and pthread_getname_np to set/get the thread name. These interfaces are available on a few other POSIX systems (BSD, QNX, Mac) in various slightly different forms. Setting the name will be something like this: #include <pthread.h> // or maybe <pthread_np.h> for some OSes // Linux int ...


58

Unnamed semaphores are not supported, you need to use named semaphores. To use named semaphores instead of unnamed semaphores, use sem_open instead of sem_init, and use sem_close and sem_unlink instead of sem_destroy.


50

Try: gcc -dumpspecs | grep pthread and look for anything that starts with %{pthread:. On my computer, this causes files to be compiled with -D_REENTRANT, and linked with -lpthread. On other platforms, this could differ. Use -pthread for most portability. Using _REENTRANT, on GNU libc, changes the way some libc headers work. As a specific example, it ...


46

semaphores have a synchronized counter and mutex's are just binary (true / false). A semaphore is often used as a definitive mechanism for answering how many elements of a resource are in use -- e.g., an object that represents n worker threads might use a semaphore to count how many worker threads are available. Truth is you can represent a semaphore by an ...


45

Create a detached thread when you know you won't want to wait for it with pthread_join(). The only performance benefit is that when a detached thread terminates, its resources can be released immediately instead of having to wait for the thread to be joined before the resources can be released. It is 'legal' not to join a joinable thread; but it is not ...


41

My favorite way to handle a thread is to encapsulate it inside a C++ object. Here's an example: class MyThreadClass { public: MyThreadClass() {/* empty */} virtual ~MyThreadClass() {/* empty */} /** Returns true if the thread was successfully started, false if there was an error starting the thread */ bool StartInternalThread() { ...


39

You can use knowledge of the mutex internals to do this. Ordinarily this wouldn't be a very good idea, but it's fine for debugging. Under Linux with the NPTL implementation of pthreads (which is any modern glibc), you can examine the __data.__owner member of the pthread_mutex_t structure to find out the thread that currently has it locked. This is how to ...


38

First store the thread id pthread_create(&thr, ...) then later call pthread_cancel(thr) However, this not a recommended programming practice! It's better to use an inter-thread communication mechanism like semaphores or messages to communicate to the thread that it should stop execution. Note that pthread_kill(...) does not actually terminate the ...


37

There are at least two things 'spurious wakeup' could mean: A thread blocked in pthread_cond_wait can return from the call even though no call to signal or broadcast on the condition occurred. A thread blocked in pthread_cond_wait returns because of a call to signal or broadcast, however after reacquiring the mutex the underlying predicate is found to no ...


35

A condition variable is quite limited if you could only signal a condition, usually you need to handle some data that's related to to condition that was signalled. Signalling/wakeup have to be done atomically in regards to achieve that without introducing race conditions, or be overly complex pthreads can also give you , for rather technical reasons, a ...


35

It strikes me as utterly terrible practice. from http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/functions/pthread_mutex_destroy.html It shall be safe to destroy an initialized mutex that is unlocked. Attempting to destroy a locked mutex results in undefined behavior. so this code guarantees undefined behavior and needs to be fixed.


34

There are many text on the subject of condition variables and their usage, so I'll not bore you with a ton of ugly details. The reason they exist at all is to allow you to notify change in a predicate state. The following are critical in understanding proper use of condition variables and their mutex association: pthread_cond_wait() unlocks the mutex. thus ...


33

Because you say struct arg_struct *args = (struct arg_struct *)args; instead of struct arg_struct *args = arguments;


32

I'll go in the opposite direction of everyone else - learn (or at least familiarize yourself with what is available in) pthreads. Since boost is mainly just a wrapper around pthreads (on posix platforms) it helps to know what is going on underneath. In attempting to be generic, boost leaves the platform specific functionality unwrapped. In order to get ...


31

The following explanation is given by David R. Butenhof in "Programming with POSIX Threads" (p. 80): Spurious wakeups may sound strange, but on some multiprocessor systems, making condition wakeup completely predictable might substantially slow all condition variable operations. In the following comp.programming.threads discussion, he expands on the ...


30

All modern thread implementations can handle an uncontended mutex lock entirely in user space (with just a couple of machine instructions) - only when there is contention, the library has to call into the kernel. Another point to consider is that if an application doesn't explicitly link to the pthread library (because it's a single-threaded application), ...


30

It basically boils down to what level of control you want over your parallelization. OpenMP is great if all you want to do is add a few #pragma statements and have a parallel version of your code quite quickly. If you want to do really interesting things with MIMD coding or complex queueing, you can still do all this with OpenMP, but it is probably a lot ...


30

The default Linux scheduling policy is SCHED_OTHER, which have no priority choice but a nice level to tweak inside the policy. You'll have to change to another scheduling policy using function pthread_setschedparam (see also man sched_setscheduler) 'Normal' scheduling policies: (from sched_setscheduler(2)) SCHED_OTHER the standard round-robin ...


30

According to this manual : The pthread_cond_broadcast() or pthread_cond_signal() functions may be called by a thread whether or not it currently owns the mutex that threads calling pthread_cond_wait() or pthread_cond_timedwait() have associated with the condition variable during their waits; however, if predictable scheduling behavior is ...


29

Go for boost::thread. It's closely related to the work on the upcoming C++ standard threads, and the interface is quite easy to use and idiomatic to C++ (RAII instead of manual resource management).


29

If you want to run code on many platforms, go for Posix Threads. They are available almost everywhere and are quite mature. OTOH if you only use Linux/gcc std::thread is perfectly fine - it has a higher abstraction level, a really good interface and plays nicely with other C++11 classes. The C++11 std::thread class unfortunately doesn't work reliably (yet) ...



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