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11

a mutex prevents multiple threads from accessing shared memory The above is an incorrect statement. By itself, a mutex does not do that. It lets you build code that prevents multiple threads from accessing shared memory or other resources concurrently, but it does not lock anything by itself. You can build a program that uses a mutex to prevent ...


10

pthread_self() function will give the tread id of current thread. pthread_t pthread_self(void); The pthread_self() function returns the Pthread handle of the calling thread. The pthread_self() function does NOT return the integral thread of the calling thread. You must use pthread_getthreadid_np() to return an integral identifier for the thread. NOTE: ...


9

If you are using C++11, here is a right way to do this: Foo& getInst() { static Foo inst(...); return inst; } According to new standard there is no need to care about this problem any more. Object initialization will be made only by one thread, other threads will wait till it complete. Or you can use std::call_once. (more info here)


8

You are wrongly using an hack to pass an integer to a thread. The idea behind what you are doing is an integer is 4 bytes and a pointer is 4 bytes in x86_32 (8 bytes in x86_64) so I can convert an integer type to a pointer type and then convert it back to an int type without losing any data. This works in the majority of the scenarios, but there is not ...


7

A mutex doesn't lock memory, it "locks" a part of the execution path, and synchronizes memory (but when locking and when unlocking). What is guaranteed is that if one thread holds the mutex, no other threads can acquire it, and any thread attempting to acquire it will be blocked until it is released. It is also guaranteed that any memory accesses (read or ...


7

RandomSeeds answer is close, but open to race conditions. <?php class FileReader extends Thread { public $file; public $pause; public function __construct($file) { $this->file = $file; $this->pause = false; } public function run() { if (($handle = fopen($this->file, "rb"))) { $len = 0; ...


7

Are C++11 mutexes compatible with threads not created with C++11's standard libraries? The C++ standard does not define a "thread" as something exclusively created by the C++ standard library. 1.10 Multi-threaded executions and data races [intro.multithread] 1 A thread of execution (also known as a thread) is a single flow of control within a ...


7

The Zend memory manager, with the help of TSRM, are purposefully built to prohibit contexts from sharing data; no context can allocate or free anything in another thread. This is referred to as a shared nothing architecture and it does exactly what it says on the tin. The job of pthreads is to breach that barrier in a safe, sane manner. Obviously, none of ...


7

Do this instead: g++ -pthread -c T.cpp A.cpp Main.cpp g++ -pthread -o out *.o -lpthread is a linker flag, it's used only when linking, not compiling, so where you have it isn't correct - the linking part happens in the second step. And generally don't use -lpthread anyway. Use -pthread both for compiling and linking. From the GCC manual: Adds ...


7

Most probably it will depend on implementation, in pthread for example signal handler will be executed and then thread will wait for mutex upon handler return: man pthread_mutex_lock If a signal is delivered to a thread waiting for a mutex, upon return from the signal handler the thread shall resume waiting for the mutex as if it was ...


6

Declare : void *fun2(void *); before fun1 The compiler assumes the default return type as int so you need to tell it the actual prototype before use


6

Building on szx's answer (so give him the credit), here's how it would work in your for loop: void *foo(void *i) { int a = *((int *) i); free(i); } int main() { pthread_t thread; for ( int i = 0; i < 10; ++1 ) { int *arg = malloc(sizeof(*arg)); if ( arg == NULL ) { fprintf(stderr, "Couldn't allocate memory for ...


6

The text you're working from is very old (2001). Older versions of Linux implemented threads as separate processes with a shared address space. Each thread had a separate pid. However this thread model was not POSIX compliant and had a number of portability problems. Starting somewhere around 2.6, Linux switched to the "Native POSIX Thread Library" (NPTL). ...


6

pthread_cleanup_push() most likley is implemented as a macro introducing an open brace { which expects a (corrsponding) pthread_cleanup_pop() in the same context. The latter then servers the closing brace }. *1 Have a look at the pre-processor output of the code (and into the according man-pages and header files of course) and you'll get enlighted. *1 ...


6

pthread_exit terminates the calling thread while pthread_join suspends execution of calling thread until target threads completes execution. They are pretty much well explained in detail in the open group documentation: pthread_exit pthread_join


6

Each thread is being passed a pointer to the arg_struct that is declared inside the loop, which is created anew on each iteration. If none of the threads execute until you exit the loop, they are technically referencing a variable that has gone out of scope. Even if it hadn't gone out of scope (say you declared it at the top of main), they would all see ...


6

Remember that &argv[1] is a char*[], i.e. an array of pointers to characters. Casting it to a char * i.e. pointer to characters is incorrect. Try: pthread_create(&thread1, NULL, getMax, argv[1]);


6

Your primes calculator is O(n^2). Note that 5000^2 = 25000000, while (10,000^2)/2 = 50000000. This makes the second thread the bottleneck of the algorithm, and is waiting a significant amount of time for the first one. In other words, the first thread is doing very little work, compared to the second one, and thus the first is idling for most of the work.


6

I will start by saying that I feel pthreads conditions and mutexes were not really necessary here, nor was non-blocking I/O the best reaction to the problems you describe. In my opinion, the problems you describe with your condition- and mutex-less version are symptoms of forgetting to close() assiduously the ends of your pipes, with the result that a copy ...


6

Yes, a statically initialized mutex is shared between threads - otherwise it would not be very useful. PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER is designed exactly for use cases like yours. Note that you need to increment i after locking the mutex. As written, the code has a race condition if two threads execute it in parallel.


5

The process received a SIGPIPE. The default behaviour for this signal is to end the process. A SIGPIPE is sent to a process if it tried to write to socket that had been shutdown for writing or isn't connected (anymore). To avoid that the program ends in this case, you could either make the process ignore SIGPIPE or install an explicit handler for ...


5

clang requires -pthread when compiling but not when linking. This is annoying, but it is observed behavior: $ clang -c x.cpp $ clang -pthread -c x.cpp $ clang -o x x.o $ clang -pthread -o x x.o clang: warning: argument unused during compilation: '-pthread' $ $ clang --version Apple LLVM version 5.0 (clang-500.2.76) (based on LLVM 3.3svn) Target: ...


5

From the man-page for pthreads: Over time, two threading implementations have been provided by the GNU C library on Linux: LinuxThreads This is the original Pthreads implementation. Since glibc 2.4, this implementation is no longer supported. NPTL (Native POSIX Threads Library) This is the modern Pthreads ...


5

No. Thread creation is a synchronization point, so all the effects that the first thread produced before creating the second thread will "have happened" by the time the second thread is created (in a way that can be made precise in the language of the standard). To be slightly more precise, in the context of one thread creating and later joining another ...


5

This is where it should crash: input[it] = scanf("%d"); scanf returns number of fields read, not the data read. Addresses of variables where to store data into should be passed as parameters. Like this: scanf("%d", &input[it]); Also input is just an uninitialized pointer. It's not pointing anywhere (meaningful). I guess you wanted in, not input. ...


5

A little story You're staying in a hotel. You want to wake up after some hours. If you want to use the swimming pool in the morning all by yourself, you want the hotel manager to only wakeup if there is either something important (spurious wakeup from pthread_cond_wait) or if the hotel pool is yours (the mutex has been locked). But if you just want to wake ...


5

That's not how you use pthread_create: http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man3/pthread_create.3.html int pthread_create(pthread_t *thread, const pthread_attr_t *attr, void *(*start_routine) (void *), void *arg); The 3rd argument is your routine, the fourth is an argument that will be forwarded to your routine. Your routine should ...


5

Obviously, the C++ standard doesn't make any guarantees about compatebility with other systems. Part of the reason the C and C++ standards added threading facilities was to standardize on one threading system. In practice it is expected that the C and C++ threads library is built to integrate with a platform threading system if there is one. For example, on ...


5

Given that multiple people commented that "in practice" it is OK to read a flag and nothing can really happen, I want to first point at a nice article on benign data races. Reading this article carefully should clarify that without synchronization primitives you can get funny behavior even when sharing a bool. The somewhat obvious approach is to use a ...


5

You can use pthread_self() The parent gets to know the thread id after the pthread_create is executed sucessfully, but while executing the thread if we want to access the thread id we have to use the function pthread_self.



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