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0

Semaphore is more used as flag, for which your really don't need to bring RTOS / OS. Semaphore can be accidentally or deliberately changed by other threads (say due to bad coding). When you thread use mutex, it owns the resources. No other thread can ever access it, before resource get free.


-1

try using a single database which contains all the accounts or try semaphores instead. like wait function here //your entire work here and exit function here i hope this will work :)


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The root cause of the problem not in pthread library: The root cause is: /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6: version `GLIBC_2.14' not found (required by /opt/gcc-linaro-4.9-2015.05-x86_64_arm-linux-gnueabihf//bin/arm-linux-gnueabihf-gcc) Your compiler is trying to use your local libc. 1) Find libc.so* in downloaded sysroot and check version with the ...


0

usleep Use a for loop and call your function, after/before it, put usleep. The usleep() function suspends execution of the calling thread for (at least) usec microseconds. The sleep may be lengthened slightly by any system activity or by the time spent processing the call or by the granularity of system timers.


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A lot of things determine a processor's speed, for Intel it is having Hyperthreading (among others like TurboBoost), especially in this case. The number of cores, the clockspeed and the number of threads per core are major factors in the performance of the CPU. An i5 with a higher clockspeed and the same features an i7 has will outperform it in any case. ...


1

Here, sum = (int *)(ptr+1); You are performing pointer arithmetic on a void * (void pointer) which is not allowed in standard C. GCC allows pointer arithmetic on void * by treating its size as 1. It should be sum = (int *)ptr+1; A cleaner approach would be to use sum itself to get the next element rather than ptr: void *print_message_function( void ...


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AnupW, Likely your problem stems from using ptr directly in your thread function. It's a void pointer so you don't know what you're going to get. I would refer you to this answer: Concept of void pointer in C programming Specifically the answer about pointer arithmetic. Try casting ptr to an int pointer like you did in main (with ptrtoarr) and using ...


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Here is a possible solution, USING NO MUTEX. Lets say you have 4 threads: main thread reading some input, the other 3 threads processing its chunk by chunk. a thread can process a chunk just after the previous one done processing it. so you have a data type for a chunk: class chunk{ byte buffer[CHUNK_SIZE]; char status; // use char for atomic input, ...


2

If you literally have to synchronise after every bit, then quite simply threading is not going to be an appropriate approach. The synchronisation overhead is going to far exceed the cost of computation, so you will be better off doing it in a single thread. Can you split the work up at a higher level? For example, have an entire frame processed by a single ...


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It might not work on all systems. Add following: #ifndef __USE_GNU #define __USE_GNU #endif #define _GNU_SOURCE #include <sched.h>


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Finally I made it work by doing the following modifications in the function which each thread executes (jaccard_visit): Wrap read operations of global variables with mutex_lock Remove function calls and implement them inline Avoid using set, instead use string or char array Separate destination and source of string functions The following code works ...


2

Use procstat(1), eg # procstat -t $(pgrep openvpn) PID TID COMM TDNAME CPU PRI STATE WCHAN 537 100051 openvpn - 0 120 sleep select which depends on libprocstat(3).


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There are a couple of issues with what you are trying to do: PDO is an object which relies on resources to function. The properties of a threaded object don't work like other objects. Resources are officially unsupported, what you want to do is use a PDO object for each thread, passing only connection parameters into a thread. Even if a driver by chance ...


0

So, the catch is not all the FFTW routines are thread-safe The upshot is that the only thread-safe (re-entrant) routine in FFTW is fftw_execute (and the new-array variants thereof). All other routines (e.g. the planner) should only be called from one thread at a time. So, for example, you can wrap a semaphore lock around any calls to the planner; ...


0

This doesn't look very promising. All your threads are contending on the same mutex, which is locked/unlocked on every iteration. It also has a problem here: (lastState[i] != signalArray[i]) signalArray is not atomic, so you might be reading stale values here.


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What? The person asked for Linux specific, and the equivalent of getpid(). Not BSD or Apple. The answer is gettid() and returns an integral type. You will have to call it using syscall(), like this: #include <sys/types.h> #include <sys/syscall.h> .... pid_t x = syscall(__NR_gettid); While this may not be portable to non-linux systems, ...


2

Use a ThreadPool. It is pretty simple to use, you'll only have to include "ThreadPool.h" and you can set the maximum number of threads based on the number of cores available. Your code should contain the following snipet. int max_threads = std::thread::hardware_concurrency(); ThreadPool pool(max_threads); auto result = pool.enqueue(func,params); ...


1

What you need is an array of structs, where each struct has one echo and trigger value. Then you pass a different array entry to each thread, so that each thread only knows its own echo and trigger values. #include <stdio.h> #include <pthread.h> typedef struct sonicPins { int trig; int echo; } sonicPins; void *threadFunc( void *args ) ...


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Pool::collect traverses a list of objects passing each one to the $collector. The $collector function should return true when the engine can destroy the reference to the Threaded object in the work list. In PHP7 The ::collect functionality was moved to Worker, though it's still exposed by Pool for utility. There are two lists, one list of items ready to ...


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pthread_yield() is a non-standard function which is typically enabled by defining #define _GNU_SOURCE While you should use -pthread for compiling, I would expect you to get the same warning with both compilations (unless -pthread defines _GNU_SOURCE which may be the case). The correct way to fix is to not use the non-standard function pthread_yield() ...


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You should use -pthread for compile and link. It not only links the library, it also sets preprocessor defines and sometimes selects a different runtime library (on Windows for example).


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One error is that the inc_count() function needs to have the mutex locked while it accesses the count variable. Your suggested change to the while() loop is incorrect - it should not call pthread_cond_wait() again if count == COUNT_LIMIT, so the original test was correct. The other error might be that c_mutex and cond_cv are not initialised correctly.


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The only time that a child process writing to memory also makes changes in the parent process's memory is when the memory written to is explicitly shared memory. The value variable is a regular variable (not in shared memory). Nothing the child does to its copy of the variable does anything to the parent's copy. On the other hand, threads do share the ...


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You missed the audit cycle. Task can not be completed immediately, so at first the collect function do not receive positive result. Several times need to check, it requires a cycle. In the example if infinite is true, always 4 tasks working. Otherwise, if size of queue is equal with pool size (4), it is over, you can exit the loop. <?php class Task ...


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POSIX, the standard that specifies pthread, is a standard (Actually, more a group of standards) defining operating system behavior and functions. An OS either implements the standard or it doesn't. The goal of POSIX is platform independence, all the same OS calls on all platforms, but as with all standards, folks bolts stuff onto the edges to get extra ...


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"So, is posix thread can be considered as standard (at least on general purpose OS)?" No, it's not standard for OS's that POSIX threads are supported. I'd say that std::thread implementations rely on some POSIX thread commonly defined features. Embedded Linux platforms are POSIX compatible of course, and you can rely on pthreads. Windows platforms ...


2

From your description in the comments, it looks like you're trying to synchronize 2 threads so that one of them doesn't fall behind too far from the other. If that's the case, you're going about this the wrong way. It is seldom a good idea to do synchronization by sleeping, because the scheduler may incur unpredictable and long delays that cause the other ...


1

One simple and robust solution to these kinds of producer-consumer problems is using a singly linked list of messages protected by a mutex. Using C99 and pthreads: #define _POSIX_C_SOURCE 200809L #include <stdlib.h> #include <stdarg.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <errno.h> struct message { struct message *next; /* Payload is ...


2

Two things explain this behavior: system causes the calling process to ignore SIGINT while waiting for its child to terminate Ctrl-C sends a SIGINT to the entire foreground process group, which includes both your program and its child sleep So, the first Ctrl-C kills the child sleep process but is ignored by the parent — the handler is never invoked — ...


0

First destroy mutex and condition on which thread is waiting and then do thread cancel. If you destroy first thread then this kind of problem comes in windows. Have look on this.


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This seems to be a typical first year assignment on "producer-consumer" problem in interprocess communications (maybe in an OS class? ) What you need is a way to pass information from a process to another process. There are some ways to do it, with the simpler being the "common memory", i.e. a chunk of memory that all processes can access. In my point of ...


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The issue is actually a bug in the gold linker your system is probably using by default. Check the name printed by ld --version. The bug appears to still be open: https://sourceware.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=16417 Using the standard bfd linker does not show this problem. The linker used is either defined by gcc -fuse-ld=gold or the symlink in /usr/bin/ld ...


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Well, according to the manpage the last argument is a user defined argument which is passed to the function that is called by the new thread. static void * thread_start(void *arg) { struct thread_info *tinfo = arg; char *uargv, *p; printf("Thread %d: top of stack near %p; argv_string=%s\n", tinfo->thread_num, ...


3

A (pthread) mutex isn't explicitly bound to a particular variable, it's just a general locking mechanism. It's up to you to make sure every action on that variable is properly surrounded by locks and unlocks. Your program has a(n implicit) contract that only 1 thread may access dotstr.sum. The mutex helps you enforce it by making sure only 1 thread can ...


-1

Pthreads is part of the libc6 package: dpkg -L libc6 | grep pthread /lib/arm-linux-gnueabihf/libpthread-2.19.so /lib/arm-linux-gnueabihf/libpthread.so.0 You might need need libc6-dev if you are compiling stuff: dpkg -L libc6-dev | grep pthread /usr/include/arm-linux-gnueabihf/bits/pthreadtypes.h /usr/include/pthread.h ...


0

curses/ncurses in the normal configuration does not support threads, and the recommendation for that has always been to run curses in a single thread. Since ncurses 5.7, there has been rudimentary support for threaded applications if the library is configured (compile-time) to use mutexes and additional entrypoints. Regarding mutexes, almost any tutorial ...


1

When the operating system creates a thread, it create a stack for it. The JVM doesn't get involved though it can say how big the stack should be. When you create an object in a thread, it allocates a block of memory from the heap. This Thread Local Allocation Buffer allows the thread to create objects concurrently with other threads. This is part of the ...


0

In POSIX, threads are used instead of tasks and there are no methods that can be used to suspend a thread, it wasn't included in the standard since it can cause deadlocks and other issues. Instead, have a look at using semaphores and/or mutexes with conditional variables to synchronize tasks. This question and answer was a very helpful resource for me: ...


0

It is not printing the hello string but it's quickly cleared with the instruction initscr(): The initscr code determines the terminal type and initializes all curses data structures. initscr also causes the first call to refresh to clear the screen. If errors occur, initscr writes an appropriate error message to standard error and exits; otherwise, ...


1

The issue here is going to be minimising memory copies. One core of a modern Intel (or AMD) CPU can saturate main-memory bandwidth. e.g. Haswell: ~26GB/s max theoretical main memory bandwidth. 26GB/s / 8B = 3.25GHz clock speed minimum to saturate DRAM, in code that on average touches 8B of new memory per clock (repeated access to the same 8B hits in L1 ...


1

The algorithm you apply to each block is so simple that the cost of sequential I/O will dominate; running the XOR loops in multiple threads will not make the program any faster. If you were reading the input from a file it could be beneficial to use threads to read, encrypt, and write different blocks concurrently.


0

In your code here snprintf(buf, "temp%d.txt", tnum); printf("debug tnum and array: %d and %s\n",tnum, buf); td[t].id = tnum; td[t].file = buf; the last line assigns a pointer into the file field of this struct typedef struct thread { int id; char file; }ThreadData; Shouldn't it be char *file; ? I don't have thread.h in MSVC so I can't compile ...


3

1) Probably a typo. But int CountWord(int tinfo, char cfile){ .. } should be int CountWord(int tinfo, char *cfile){ .. } 2) You are passing the same buf to all threads from main(). Data race and undefined behaviour. 3) None of the snprintf() calls take the size argument. Undefined behaviour. 4) Since all threads work on different data, you don't ...


1

This line is wrong: rc = pthread_create(&threads[t], NULL, PrintHello, (void *) mystArray); Given how you're written the rest of the code, it should be: rc = pthread_create(&threads[t], NULL, PrintHello, (void *) ( mystArray[t] ) ); But the use of malloc()/calloc() is ...


3

rc = pthread_create(&threads[t], NULL, PrintHello, (void *) mystArray); You're missing the array index here, you mean mystArray + t. On a side note: remove all these casts, they make the code hard to read. void * is generic and implicitly convertible in c.


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GCC's error message is straightforward: the pthread_create method expects a method that accepts a void* argument. Change your function to this: void* threadFunc(void* sonicPinsPtr) { struct sonicPins* args = sonicPinsPtr; // rest of your code here }


0

I am not too sure myself but I would think you could do something like pthread_t inter_com, inter_com2; and th_err_s = pthread_create(&inter_com, NULL, serv_com, (void *)&pass_arg); th_err_c = pthread_create(&inter_com2, NULL, cli_com, (void *)&pass_arg); I think it should give you 2 ids of threads. But careful when sharing ...


3

Short Answer You are sharing memory between thread and sharing memory between threads is slow. Long Answer Your program is using a number of thread to write to my_array and another thread to read from my_array. Effectively my_array is shared by a number of threads. Now lets assume you are benchmarking on a multicore machine, you probably are hoping that ...


0

Resources are not officially supported and those objects depend on resources. You already found the solution: use method scope variables, you can also use static (class) scope variables.


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It is rare that a multithreaded program scales perfectly with the number of threads. In your case you measured a speed-up factor of ca 0.9 (665/748) with 4 threads. That is not so good. Here are some factors to consider: The overhead of starting threads and dividing the work. For small jobs the cost of starting additional threads can be considerably larger ...



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