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210

openssl genrsa -out mykey.pem 1024 will actually produce a public - private key pair. The pair is stored in the generated mykey.pem file. openssl rsa -in mykey.pem -pubout > mykey.pub will extract the public key and print that out. Here is a link to a page that describes this better. EDIT: Check the examples section here. To just output the public ...


97

People looking for SSH public key... If you're looking to extract the public key for use with OpenSSH, you will need to get the public key a bit differently $ ssh-keygen -y -f mykey.pem > mykey.pub This public key format is compatible with OpenSSH. Append the public key to remote:~/.ssh/authorized_keys and you'll be good to go docs from ...


79

Your teacher gave you: Public Key: (10142789312725007, 5) which means n = 10142789312725007 e = 5 where n is the modulus and e is the public exponent. In addition, you're given Private Key: (10142789312725007, 8114231289041741) meaning that d = 8114231289041741 where d is the decryption exponent that should remain secret. You can ...


51

openssl rsa -in privkey.pem -pubout > key.pub That writes the public key to key.pub


37

For me setting up this environment variable worked. Restart didn't. set OPENSSL_CONF=c:/libs/openssl-0.9.8k/openssl.cnf


32

Edit: As of Git version 1.7.9, it is possible to sign Git commits (git commit -S). Updating the answer slightly to reflect this. The question title is: Is there a way to “autosign” commits in Git with a GPG key? Short answer: yes, but don't do it. Addressing the typo in the question: git commit -s does not sign the commit. Rather, from the man ...


29

An RSA private key contains all the information needed to produce the public key. In most formats including openssl's the private key is represented as a PKCS#1 RSAPrivatekey object or some variant thereof. This format has a number of fields including the modulus and public exponent and thus is a strict superset of the information in an RSA public key.


27

Starting from the decoded base64 data of an OpenSSL rsa-ssh Key, i've been able to guess a format: 00 00 00 07: four byte length prefix (7 bytes) 73 73 68 2d 72 73 61: "ssh-rsa" 00 00 00 01: four byte length prefix (1 byte) 25: RSA Exponent (e): 25 00 00 01 00: four byte length prefix (256 bytes) RSA Modulus (n): 7f 9c 09 8e 8d 39 9e cc d5 03 29 8b c4 78 ...


25

Note: if you don't want to add -S all the time to make sure your commits are signed, there is a proposal (branch 'pu' for now, December 2013, so no guarantee it will make it to a git release) to add a config which will take care of that option for you. Update May 2014: it is in Git 2.0 (after being resend in this patch series) See commit 2af2ef3 by Nicolas ...


24

Im doing RSA Encrypt in Android 2.2+ and decrypt on a tomcat 6 java 1.6 server. I was getting this exact problem, reading all over the place and in part thanks to @Femi 's answer I came across what I needed. The solution was to use the folowing init for the Cipher: Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("RSA/ECB/PKCS1Padding"); This works doing encryption ...


23

I think you're confusing the basic Diffe-Hellman, which is a key exchange protocol, with the 'authenticated version' which uses a certificate authority (CA). Nice explanation of how the basic Diffe-Hellman is vulnerable to man-in-the-middle from RSA Labs. "The Diffie-Hellman key exchange is vulnerable to a man-in-the-middle attack. In this attack, an ...


22

You can't just change the delimiters from ---- BEGIN SSH2 PUBLIC KEY ---- to -----BEGIN RSA PUBLIC KEY----- and expect that it will be sufficient to convert from one format to another (which is what you've done in your example). This article has a good explanation about both formats. What you get in an RSA PUBLIC KEY is closer to the content of a PUBLIC ...


20

It's the ephemeral aspect of DHE and ECDHE that provides perfect forward secrecy. The idea is that even if someone records traffic and compromises the server to get its private key, they won't be able to decipher that traffic, because they'll be missing the ephemeral DH parameters that won't have been saved. With fixed DH, the private DH parameters are ...


18

The key format used by ssh is defined in the RFC #4253. The format for RSA public key is the following : string "ssh-rsa" mpint e /* key public exponent */ mpint n /* key modulus */ All data type encoding is defined in the section #5 of RFC #4251. string and mpint (multiple precision integer) types are encoded this way : 4-bytes word: ...


17

From one of my favorite books ever, Applied Cryptography by Bruce Schneier "If someone created a database of all primes, won't he be able to use that database to break public-key algorithms? Yes, but he can't do it. If you could store one gigabyte of information on a drive weighing one gram, then a list of just the 512-bit primes ...


17

I'd pass the option -o BatchMode=yes to ssh and see if that works. It will disable prompting for a password, which I think is equivalent in practice to your desire to find out if authentication via keys is possible. ssh-test-thingy could be written as a bash script like so: exec ssh -o BatchMode=yes "$@" true This will simply pass the user@host (and any ...


17

Encrypt #!/usr/bin/env python import fileinput from M2Crypto import RSA rsa = RSA.load_pub_key("public.pem") ctxt = rsa.public_encrypt(fileinput.input().read(), RSA.pkcs1_padding) print ctxt.encode('base64') Decrypt #!/usr/bin/env python import fileinput from M2Crypto import RSA priv = RSA.load_key("private.pem") ctxt = ...


17

Public-key cryptography is usually used for small amounts of data only. It is slow, and can be hard to use right. The usual practice is to use other methods to reduce the asymmetric problem to one where the security is provided by a shared key, then use public-key cryptography to protect that shared key. For example: To encrypt a file, randomly generate a ...


16

Code example: private static string _privateKey; private static string _publicKey; private static UnicodeEncoding _encoder = new UnicodeEncoding(); private static void RSA() { var rsa = new RSACryptoServiceProvider(); _privateKey = rsa.ToXmlString(true); _publicKey = rsa.ToXmlString(false); var text = "Test1"; Console.WriteLine("RSA // Text to ...


16

Though, the above technique works for the general case, it didn't work on Amazon Web Services (AWS) PEM files. I did find in the AWS docs the following command works: ssh-keygen -y http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ec2-key-pairs.html


15

Or you need to specify the absolute path to the config, something like this: C:\OpenSSL-Win64\bin\openssl.cnf


14

You are looking for ssh-copy-id. All this command does is create .ssh and .ssh/authorized_keys and set their permissions appropriately if they don't exist. Then it appends your public key to the end of .ssh/authorized_keys.


14

Note Well: As emboss mentions in the comments, this answer is a poor fit for an actual system. Firstly, file encryption should not be carried out using this method (The lib provides AES, for example.). Secondly, this answer does not address any of the wider issues that will also affect how you engineer your solution. The original source also goes ...


14

OK, I managed to get this working. There were several problems with this implementation. One problem was that certain things had to be done in order. Here is what seems to need to happen: The raw data needs to be put into a PgpLiteralData object The literal data needs to be encrypted. The encrypted data needs to be compressed. The compressed data ...


13

Your general understanding about interchanging the roles of public and private key is correct. In the end, RSA is based on the fact that m^(ed) congruent m (mod n) What is normally titled RSA encryption is typically the operation m^e mod n, raising the message to the e-th power where e is the public key. Decryption is then (m^e)^d mod n, raising ...


13

As per DaveShaw's comment, it's currently not supported as there is a Change request on the visual studio feedback portal. https://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio/suggestions/3801342-add-support-for-ssh-keys-as-alternate-authenticati


12

Here's a relatively simple way to look at it (and one that is doable by hand). If you were to factor the number completely, then the highest factor you would need to consider is sqrt(N): sqrt(10142789312725007) = 100711415.9999997567 The first prime below this is 100711409, just 6 below the sqrt(N). 10142789312725007 / 100711409 = 100711423 therefore ...


12

RSA encryption (or any encryption algorithm) should work regardless of environment. However, it is possible that certain systems make different assumptions about default padding and the mode of operation. Make sure that when you are performing encryption and decryption that you fully specify not only the algorithm, but also the mode of operation (CBC, etc) ...


12

Only one problem: An attacker does not need to know the actual password. All he needs to see is the value that is sent to the server. This value allows the user to log in. It does not matter what that value is; whether it's plaintext, encrypted text or a picture of a cat. It's just a token that authenticates the user. If an attacker can see this token and ...


12

In RSA you should use the public key for encryption and the private key for decryption. Your sample code uses for encryption and decryption the public key - this can not work. Hence in the decryption part you should initialize the cipher this way: cipher1.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, privateKey); Furthermor your code has a second significant bug: You are ...



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