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104

The accepted answer is good, but I don't feel like it explains the purpose of the pumping lemma. The pumping lemma is a simple proof to show that a language is not regular, meaning that a Finite State Machine cannot be built for it. The canonical example is the language (a^n)(b^n). This is the simple language which is just any number of as, followed by the ...


33

As others have pointed out, this answer is partially incorrect and the highest rated answer should be the accepted answer. Effectively a pumping lemma states that one can insert arbitrary strings (allowable within the language) and not reach a conclusion. Said differently a word can be "pumped" such that any string can be inserted into the middle of ...


11

The reason that finite languages work with the pumping lemma is because you can make the pumping length longer than the longest word in the language. The pumping lemma, as stated on Wikipedia (I don't have my theory of computation book with me) is the following: Let L be a regular language. Then there exists an integer p ≥ 1 depending only on L such ...


8

It's a device intended to prove that a given language cannot be of a certain class. Let's consider the language of balanced parentheses (meaning symbols '(' and ')', and including all strings that are balanced in the usual meaning, and none that aren't). We can use the pumping lemma to show this isn't regular. (A language is a set of possible strings. A ...


8

You are not completely clear about pumping lemma. What pumping lemma say: Formal definition: Pumping lemma for regular languages Let L be a regular language. Then there exists an integer p ≥ 1 depending only on L such that every string w in L of length at least p (p is called the "pumping length") can be written as w = xyz (i.e., w can be divided ...


7

Its a difficult thing to get in layman's terms, but basically regular expressions should have a non-empty substring within it that can be repeated as many times as you wish while the entire new word remains valid for the language. In practice, pumping lemmas are not sufficient to PROVE a language correct, but rather as a way to do a proof by contradiction ...


6

The main idea of the pumping lemma is to tell you that when you have a regular language L with infinite number of terms, then there is a size S and an infinite subset X of terms T in language L with length(T) > S for all T in X such that all the terms in X will contain the same pattern P inside them. Intuitively, each term in the set X will repeat the ...


6

If we replace character c with x where (x ∈ {a,b}+), say, L2 = {WXWR| x, W ∈ {a,b}+}, then L2 is a regular language. Yes, L2 is Regular Language :). You can write regular expression for L2 too. Language L2 = {WXWR| x, W ∈ {a,b}+} means: string should start any string consist of a and b that is W and end with reverse string WR. notice: ...


5

One important stumbling issue here is that "being able to pump" does not imply context free, rather "not being able to pump" shows it is not context free. Similarly, being grey does not imply you're an elephant, but being an elephant does imply you're grey... Grammar context free => Pumping Lemma is definitely satisfied Grammar not context free ...


5

I'd begin by picking a slightly better z = a^(m+2)b^(m+1)c^(m), where m is the pumping length. This string is clearly in the language and its length is greater than or equal to m. So, assuming the language is a CFL, the pumping lemma applies to it. Now, since you know that |vwx| <= m and that |vx| > 0, you also know that vwx must consist of (1) only a's, ...


4

L1={anbn : n>=0} and L2={bnan : n>=0} are both context free. Since context-free languages are closed under concatenation, L3=L1L2 is also context-free. However, L3 is not the same language as L4={anb2nan : n >= 0}. The string abbbaa is in L3, but not L4. So is L4 context-free? If so, it must obey the pumping lemma for context-free languages. Let p ...


4

When using the pumping lemma, while you are allowed to choose the string to pump (let's call it w), you are not allowed to choose how to split w into three parts xyz. Instead, what you need to do is show that for any way that w could be split into xyz, there is some choice of i such that xyiz such that xyiz ∉ Lneq. So while you are correct that if y ...


3

Sure the string can be pumped. Let u = a^p b^(p-1), v = b, x = e, y = a, z=a^(p-1) b^p. Now uvxyz = s and for any i u v^i x y^i z has an equal amount of as and bs.


3

"IN CONTEXT OF PUMPING LEMMA FOR REGULAR LANGUAGES " Yes we agree, All finite languages are regular language means we can have Finite automata as well as regular expression for any finite language. Whereas a infinite language may be regular or not. Venn-Diagram is shown below. So we need to only check for infinite language L where its regular of not! ...


3

Not quite, you draw the correct conclusion, but the reasoning is a bit off. The Pumping lemma states that for every regular language L, there exists an integer p >= 1 where every string s of length greater than or equal to p can be written as s = xyz where the following conditions hold: y is non-empty The length of xy ≤ p xyiz is in the language L ...


3

A state doesn't recognise a language. A DFA recognises a language by accepting exactly the set of words in the languages and no others. A DFA has many states. If there is a regular language L, which can be modelled by the Pumping Lemma, it will have a property n. For a DFA with s states, in order for it to accept L, s must be >= n. The last line merely ...


2

You're probably looking for Benjamin Carle and Paliath Narendran "On Extended Regular Expressions" LNCS 5457 DOI:10.1007/978-3-642-00982-2_24 PDF Extended Abstract at http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/17/60/43/PDF/notes_on_extended_regexp.pdf C. Campeanu, K. Salomaa, S. Yu: A formal study of practical regular expressions, International Journal of ...


2

Note: After a bit of back-and-forth in the comments, I see that I'm wrong and William's answer is actually correct. I'll leave this answer here so I can point out where my line of reasoning failed. I'd think about it like this: What properties must substrings v,w,x have in order to even have a chance of remaining within the language definition after ...


2

The goal is to prove that for any string with length >= a minimum pumping length, the string cannot be pumped. That is, if you split it into substrings uvxyz, the string that results from making copies (or removing copies) of v and y are still in language A. Note that you only have to show that one string in the language cannot be pumped (as long as it ...


2

I understand that this thread is old, but just in case this could help another student in the same situation, here is some discussion. This language is regular, and you cannot show it to be non-regular using the pumping lemma. To see that it's regular, it suffices to produce a regular expression to generate it or an NFA to recognize it. The regular ...


2

Note that Pumping lemma requires every string in L to stay in L after pumping. So, it is enough to get contradiction even for some specific form of strings in L. apb2pc3p is a nice example but I suggest to try a shorter one: apbp+1cp+2. The reasoning is almost the same as in the Wikipedia article: Pumping lemma:Usage. You will have the same five cases ...


2

'Pump y with all 0s' isn't terribly clear, but an example of how this works out is as follows: Pick some value for y: let's say y = '0'. Pick some value for i: i = 1 Then s = xyz. We will assume this holds true for the moment. Now, since we assume B is regular, we know that - for any value of i - the string formed by xyiz should also be in B! Let's try ...


2

Any string in the language with |W| > 1 can be interpreted as a string in the language where |W| = 1. Thus, a string is in the language if it begins and ends with the same symbol. There are two symbols: a and b. So that language is equivalent to the language a(a+b)(a+b)*a + b(a+b)(a+b)*b. To prove this, you should formalize the argument that "if y is in WxW, ...


2

Since you want to master the process, I'll point out a few things before showing a proof. The first thing to notice is that the + and the = may only appear once each. So when you write your string w as w = abc, the pumped portion, b, cannot contain + or = otherwise you'd reach a trivial contradiction (I'm not using the more standard w = xyz notation to ...


2

Choose as the string 1(0^n+1) + 1(0^n) = 11(0^n). In other words, your string will read "the sum of two to the power n+2 plus two to the power n+1 is equal to 11 followed by n zeroes". Since the string to be pumped will consist entirely of symbols from the first addend, pumping must change the number represented (adding or removing digits to a number will ...


2

Hmmm ... You were almost ! there. Just in the last statement you are not pumping the string w = xyz at y. Now we start by assuming that L is regular where L = { w | w in {0,1}* and w has equal number of 0s and 1s } and then we will go on to prove that for any i >= 0 the pumped string i.e w = xyiz does not contain the equal number of 0s and 1s ( a ...


2

The pumping lemma is this: For a regular language L, there exists a p > 0 such that for all w ∈ L where |w| ≥ p, there exists some split w = vxu, for which the following holds: |vx| ≤ p |x| > 0 vxiu ∈ L for all i ≥ 0 The reason I stated it again is because some of your inequalities are wrong. What is the pumping lemma useful for? ...


1

Say you choose the string: a^2b^5 aabbbbb. Which is in the language. Now your opponent can choose XYZ. Their options: 1.) X(empty)Y(some a's) 2.) X(some a's)Y(some a's and some b's) 3.) X(some a's)Y(some a's) Based on their possible choices, you pump up Y using Y^i where i is an arbitrary number of your choice. Say they choose 1.) X(-)Y(a)Z(abbbbb) ...


1

To the above answer, "The pumping lemma says: If a language A is regular => there is a number p (pumping length) where, if s is any string in L such that |s| >= p, then s may be divided into three pieces s=xyz, satisfying the following condition:" You mean "If a language L is regular" Also, the three conditions 1. xy^iz is in L for each i>=0 2. |y|>=0 3. ...


1

I'm not too sure about how to use Ogden's lemma here but your "proof" is wrong. When using the pumping lemma to prove that a language is not context free you cannot choose the splitting into uvxyz. The splitting is chosen "for you" and you have to show that the lemma is not fulfilled for any uvxyz.



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