Hot answers tagged

125

alternative way: mail -N d * -N Inhibits the initial display of message headers when reading mail or editing a mail folder. d * delete all mails


70

You can simply delete the /var/mail/username file to delete all emails for a specific user. Also, emails that are outgoing but have not yet been sent will be stored in /var/spool/mqueue.


56

Personally, I use $ rm **/*.orig if I get tired of the .orig files. This works in Zsh and in Bash 4 after you run shopt -s globstar. But if you use another shell or want a built-in solution, then maybe you'll like the purge extension. That lets you remove all untracked files with $ hg purge You can remove all untracked and ignored files with $ hg ...


37

Amazon has introduced object expiration recently. Amazon S3 Announces Object Expiration Amazon S3 announced a new feature, Object Expiration that allows you to schedule the deletion of your objects after a pre-defined time period. Using Object Expiration to schedule periodic removal of objects eliminates the need for you to identify ...


28

Just use: mail d 1-15 quit Which will delete all messages between number 1 and 15. to delete all, use the d *. I just used this myself on ubuntu 12.04.4, and it worked like a charm. For example: eric@dev ~ $ mail Heirloom Mail version 12.4 7/29/08. Type ? for help. "/var/spool/mail/eric": 2 messages 2 new >N 1 Cron Daemon Tue Jul 29 ...


27

btw. find utility has an action -delete so you can type only: find <path-to-files> -name '*.orig' -delete


12

First, that answer you linked to was pretty unsafe - hand-editing /etc/passwd ?!? dselect where an apt wildcard would do? Crazy stuff. I'm not surprised you're having issues. As for the no such file or directory messages: You need to make sure you have a running PostgreSQL server ("cluster") before you can use admin commands like createdb, because they make ...


11

One liner: echo 'd *' | mail -N


10

Rather than deleting, I think we can nullify the file, because the file will be created if the mail service is still on. Something like following will do the job cat /dev/null >/var/spool/mail/tomlinuxusr And yes, sorry for awakening this old thread but I felt I could contribute.


9

I've disassembled the function in question (_utilPurgeDiskBuffers) from the CHUD framework. The function doesn't seem to be very complex, but since I'm no MacOS programmer, the imports and called sys APIs don't make much sense to me. The first thing the API does is to call another function, namely _miscUtilsUserClientConnect_internal. This function seems ...


9

If you just want to delete the .orig files, and you happen to be on a Windows computer, the following seems to work well: D:\workspace>hg purge -I **/*.orig --all This will delete all untracked files that end in .orig, but won't delete other untracked files, as the other answers would. You can test this before running it by putting the --print flag in ...


8

You made me curious because I didn't know what was the purge command, so I typed man purge on a terminal: NAME purge -- force disk cache to be purged (flushed and emptied) SYNOPSIS purge DESCRIPTION Purge can be used to approximate initial boot conditions with a cold disk buffer cache for performance analysis. It does not affect ...


6

There is no way to undo a purge. It deletes files that weren't tracked by Mercurial, so Mercurial can't help you get them back.


6

It seems that: You can use usr/bin/purge (type purge in the terminal) to flush the disk cache (inactive memory), or you can do many random reads from the hard disk to do the same thing. Taken from a comment from user guns.


6

The following looks a bit complicated, but is very cautious to be correct, even with unusual or intentionally malicious filenames. Unfortunately, it requires GNU tools: count=0 while IFS= read -r -d ' ' && IFS= read -r -d '' filename; do (( ++count > 3 )) && printf '%s\0' "$filename" done < <(find . -maxdepth 1 -type f -printf ...


6

Varnish 4.0 varnishlog -g request -q 'ReqMethod eq "PURGE"'


5

I hate to give a non constructive answer but an ORM isn’t really meant for doing bulk operations on the database. So it looks like you native query is probably the best bet for these operations. You should also make sure that your ORM is updated to reflect the new state of the database otherwise you may get some weirdness happening. ORMs are great tools ...


5

Varnish 3.x varnishlog -d -c -m RxRequest:PURGE That will output any of the purges in memory. And without -d it will output only current requests: varnishlog -c -m RxRequest:PURGE From man varnishlog: -d Process old log entries on startup. Normally, varnishlog will only process entries which are written to the log after it starts.


4

For the most part I think that you're stuck doing deletes. Your comments on the difficulty of using partitions in your case probably do prevent them being used effectively (different delete dates being used depending on the type of record) but it it possible that you could create a "delete date" column on the records that you could partition on? It would ...


4

Please do yourself (and everyone else) a big favour and start writing dates in ISO-8601 format (i.e. YYYY-MM-DD). E.g. instead of ./webbmaster_bellarose_joomla_12-29-2009.sql.gz you would have ./webbmaster_bellarose_joomla_2009-12-29.sql.gz Doing so have many benefits, most importantly here that chronological and alphabetical order becomes identical. ...


4

We run the "optimize repository index" weekly and also run the "empty trash" task hourly. I can tell you that storage isn't an issue for us for indexes. We have a ton of files in those .index directories, but they're all under 1K in size...even for our central proxy repo. Our total comes in ~1GB. However, our repo is quite large. We've got a very large ...


4

try this: if varnish 3.0 and up. vcl_recv { if (req.request == "PURGE") { if (!client.ip ~purge){ error 405 "Not allowed"; } ban("req.http.host == " +req.http.host+" && req.url ~ "+req.url); error 200 "Ban added"; }


4

This will list all files except the newest three ls -t | tail -n +4 This will delete those files ls -t | tail -n +4 | xargs rm -- But beware: parsing ls can be dangerous when the filenames contain funny characters like newlines or spaces. If you are certain that your filenames do not contain funny characters then parsing ls is quite safe, even more so ...


4

No, the OS does not cache files. However, the reason this might be happening is that files are not actually fully deleted until both the link count and the number of processes that have the file open both go down to zero. The unlink(2) manual page, which documents the system call used by tools like rm, reads as follows: The unlink() function removes ...


4

Use the -X/--exclude command line switch (can be specified more than once): hg purge -X 'glob:node_modules/**.js' The above pattern ignores all Javascript files in the node_modules directory, including those in subdirectories. Use /** to match everything under a directory: hg purge -X 'glob:node_modules/**' See the File names and pattern matching ...


3

The following will remove .orig files in your entire working copy hierarchy and also works for paths containing spaces: find . -name *.orig | while read -d $'\n' file; do rm -v "$file"; done; I use an alias in my .bash_profile: alias clearorig='echo "Removing .orig files..."; find . -name *.orig | \ while read -d $'\''\n'\'' file; do rm -v "$file"; ...


3

take a look at filter-tree. You need to edit the commit that introduced the file. Once that is done, everyone can fetch. This will make non-fast-forward remote branches in their repos - each commit after removing the offending file will be different now. When they rebase their current changes on top of the new remote branches, it should not push the large ...


3

Yes it 'deleted' files would still be in the SVN repo.


3

The repo will definitely hold on to the data. The correct technical term is obliterate. Here is a link to why this feature doesn't exist on Subversion. It won't come in the next versions 1.7 / 1.8 either. The Roadmap for Subversion is here. Since you are using hosted Subversion, check with the host if they allow svndumpfilter command to be remotely ...


3

Yes and no. This hypothetical feature is called obliterate, but it currently does not exist. Since the feature request dates from 2001, it's not likely that it will ever be implemented either. You can however completely dump, filter and reload the repository history as described in the svn book.



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