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167

Probably the best site for browser compatibility information is CanIUse. Here's the section on history. Summary - IE9: no, IE10: yes (as of platform preview 3) The first Release Candidate of IE9 (released 10th Feb 2011) does not support history.pushState or history.replaceState. Generally no new features are added after a product gets to RC stage so it is ...


157

For a great tutorial the Mozilla Developer Network page on this functionality is all you'll need: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/Manipulating_the_browser_history Unfortunately, the HTML5 History API is implemented differently in all the HTML5 browsers (making it inconsistent and buggy) and has no fallback for HTML4 browsers. Fortunately, History.js ...


82

Is pushState bad if you need search engines to read your content? No, the talk about pushState is geared around accomplishing the same general process to hashbangs, but with better-looking URLs. Think about what really happens when you use hashbangs... You say: With hashbangs, google knows to go to the escaped_fragment url to get their static content. ...


59

The way I was able to get this to work is as follows: In the Edit Redirection Rules section of the S3 Console for your domain, add the following rules: <RoutingRules> <RoutingRule> <Condition> <HttpErrorCodeReturnedEquals>404</HttpErrorCodeReturnedEquals > </Condition> <Redirect> ...


56

if (history.pushState) { // supported. } Quickest test is to run this in the browser console to see if it's supported: if (history.pushState) { alert('supported'); } Also notice that in FF typeof(history.pushState) returns "function", while in IE it returns "undefined"


36

5.5.9.1 Event definitions The popstate event is fired in certain cases when navigating to a session history entry. According to this, there is no reason for popstate to be fired when you use pushState. But an event such as pushstate would come in handy. Because history is a host object, you should be careful with it, but Firefox seems to be nice in ...


36

if (window.history && window.history.pushState) See also this All-In-One Almost-Alphabetical No-Bullshit Guide to Detecting Everything


34

While #2 might be "easier" for you as a developer, it only provides search engine crawling. And yes, if Google finds out your serving different content, you might be penalized (I'm not an expert on that, but I have heard of it happening). Both SEO and accessibility (not just for disabled person, but accessibility via mobile devices, touch screen devices, ...


28

I benefited a lot from 'Dive into HTML 5'. The explanation and demo are easier and to the point. History chapter - http://diveintohtml5.info/history.html and history demo - http://diveintohtml5.info/examples/history/fer.html


28

event is the jQuery event object, not the DOM one. To access the DOM event object, use event.originalEvent: http://jsfiddle.net/pimvdb/un4Xk/1/. var state = event.originalEvent.state; Remember that the state is only defined when the new state has data, so it is not available when clicking and then going back to the initial state: initial state link to ...


27

You must implement it yourself which is quite easy. When invoking pushState give the data object a unique incrementing id (uid). When onpopstate handler is invoked; check the state uid against a persistent variable containing the last state uid. Update the persistent variable with the current state uid. Do different actions depending on if state uid was ...


26

This might help : http://caniuse.com/#search=history


23

History.js Quote from the repo: History.js gracefully supports the HTML5 History/State APIs (pushState, replaceState, onPopState) in all browsers. Including continued support for data, titles, replaceState. Supports jQuery, MooTools and Prototype. For HTML5 browsers this means that you can modify the URL directly, without needing to use hashes anymore. ...


23

The browser displays the loading state when there is an element in the document which is loading. Ajax requests are made entirely from within JavaScript; the document is not affected and so the loading state isn't triggered. On the other hand, most of Facebook's requests are made by inserting a <script> tag into the document, pointing to a JavaScript ...


21

Looking at the Modernizer source code this is how it checks for push state: tests['history'] = function() { return !!(window.history && history.pushState); }; So a simple way for you would just be: var hasPushstate = !!(window.history && history.pushState); One must first check for the existence of window.history before going ...


20

This is possible in modern browsers by using the HTML5 History API: history.pushState(null, null, '/some-path') See https://developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/Manipulating_the_browser_history#The_pushState%28%29.c2.a0method This works in Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari (not IE).


20

The popstate only contains a state when there is one. When it goes like this: initial page loaded new page loaded, with state added via pushState back button pressed then there is no state, because the initial page was loaded regularly, not with pushState. As a result, the onpopstate event is fired with a state of null. So when it is null, it means the ...


20

Keep in mind while using HTML5 pushstate if a user copies or bookmarks a deep link and visits it again, then that will be a direct server hit which will 404 so you need to be ready for it and even a pushstate js library won't help you. The easiest solution is to add a rewrite rule to your Nginx or Apache server like so: Apache (in your vhost if you're using ...


18

I think you need this: http://code.google.com/web/ajaxcrawling/ You can also install a special backend that "renders" your page by running javascript on the server, and then serves that to google. Combine both things and you have a solution without programming things twice. (As long as your app is fully controllable via anchor fragments.)


17

So the bottom line is that iOS has added its own security around the history API, meaning that you can't use script to change the url. Only a user action can allow the history API to change the url - i.e. a click - as per Aral's example. The workaround is to uses a hash (aka fragment identifier) on the url. Instead of the history.pushState we'll just ...


16

Explanation First, you need to know that domain.com/#/about will call the '/' route of your server because it doesn't read the # fragment. Your server will render the base of your Backbone.js application and Backbone will trigger the 'about' route. So, you need to declare two routes in Express JS: / /about Code app.get('/', function(req, res) { // ...


16

You could use the replace-method from window.location, without the second newSubStr-argument. This works in all known browsers, even oldIE: function replaceHash(hash) { return location.replace( '#' + hash.replace(/^#/, '') ); }


15

You shouldn't use pushState to push invalid URLs at all. It's meant to be used in cases where the site works both with and without AJAX - i.e. you push the URL which would result in the same output without AJAX when creating this output with AJAX. If you want only virtual URLs (like in the pre-pushState era), keep using the hash tag.


15

GitHub uses http://pjax.heroku.com/ For browsers that don't support pushState it simply degrades to normal old boring full-page-load behaviour.


15

First, I show the definition of function replaceHash, which accepts only one argument: The new location hash. A detailed explanation of the logic can be found at the bottom of the answer. Code: // Should be executed BEFORE any hash change has occurred. (function(namespace) { // Closure to protect local variable "var hash" if ('replaceState' in history) ...


15

Backbone routing and query parameters are an unhappy marriage. Problems are well documented in this GitHub issue. The core problem is that Backbone.Router is designed to work with URL hash fragments as well as the pushState API. When using hash URLs the query string precedes the hash, and is never matched in the route. With pushState the query string is ...


15

I you really want to stick with using Router.navigate to benefit from the routing system that Backbone.js provides without having to deal with hashbang bugs when used in a Chrome extension (e.g. routes including a slash being overwritten), you could make Router.navigate load the url directly, skipping the whole pushState gymnastic. This is actually pretty ...


14

You can detect support for history management (as well as many other browser features) using Modernizr. if (Modernizr.history)


14

Here is what i did to my application. Every route ending with a '/' (except the root it self) will serve index.html : location ~ ^/.+/$ { rewrite .* /index.html last; } You can also prefix your route : Backbone.history.start({pushState: true, root: "/prefix/"}) and then : location ~ ^/prefix/ { rewrite .* /index.html last; } Or ...


14

I solved this problem by extending Backbone.Router class and storing all my routes while navigate: class MyRouter extends Backbone.Router constructor: (options) -> @on "all", @storeRoute @history = [] super options storeRoute: -> @history.push Backbone.history.fragment previous: -> if ...



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