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127

The original question was asked a few months ago, however the accepted answer doesn't explain how to track the issue down, or what the root cause is. I observed similar issue and decided to go deeper to see what's going on exactly - let me describe my findings. I hope someone will find it useful. Short story It is indeed related to monkey-patching the ...


63

nose isn't really a unit testing framework. It's a test runner and a great one at that. It can run tests created using pyUnit, py.test or doctest. My preference for unit testing framework is pyUnit. It's similar to other xUnit frameworks and is easy to relate to for people without python background. There is also pretty good support for it in ...


46

Interesting that no one yet has answered to defend py.test. On the testing-in-python mailing list it is quite popular, e.g. this recent thread "why do you use py.test?". Most common responses included: easy support for distributed testing good plugin architecture easier assertions (just assert x == 42, no assertEqual()) funcargs


22

Please go to Settings | Python Integrated Tools and change the default test runner to py.test. Then you'll get the py.test option to create tests instead of the unittest one.


20

We initially started our automation framework using unittest and nosetest. We subclassed all our test classes from unittest since unittest offers great syntax for assertions. For the actual running of the tests, we used nose which was pretty good in terms of reporting and specifying which tests needed to be run. The test generation logic was also pretty good ...


16

I just use the standard unittest. Not sure how you'd write tests as effectively with another style -- perhaps each test in a function, but then how would you handle setup / teardown?


15

Because django.conf.settings is lazy it will attempt to import settings module only when you try to access it. That's why your test doesn't fail when you simply import settings object. Your problem is already discussed here: https://github.com/pelme/pytest_django/issues/23 This is an issue with pytest and not with pytest-django itself. Pytest for some ...


13

I had the same problem. I fixed it by adding an empty __init__.py file to my tests directory.


12

The -s switch disables per-test capturing.


11

I like the general "test-step" idea. I'd term it as "incremental" testing and it makes most sense in functional testing scenarios IMHO. Here is a an implementation that doesn't depend on internal details of pytest (except for the official hook extensions): import pytest def pytest_runtest_makereport(item, call): if "incremental" in item.keywords: ...


11

You will have to specify what is "almost" for you: assert abs(x-y) < 0.0001 and although its a completely different question: assert all([i==j for i,j in zip(tuple1,tuple2)])


11

It appears to be an incompatibility between PyCharm and py.test 2.4.x. If you install py.test 2.3.5 (for example, pip install pytest==2.3.5) it works fine. I suggest submitting a bug report to JetBrains.


10

I think I can now answer my own question, it's pretty simple: import py py.test.cmdline.main(args) Then I can run this module and or start it with the integrated debugger. args is the list of command line arguments, so for example to run only particular tests I can use something like: args_str = "-k test_myfavorite" py.test.cmdline.main(args_str.split(" ...


10

What is stopping you importing the specific exception and using it in your with pytest.raises statement? Why is this not working? It would be more helpful if you could provide more detail about what problem you are facing. # your code class CustomError(Exception): pass def foo(): raise ValueError('everything is broken') def bar(): raise ...


10

When you run py.test, you can pass -rsx to report skipped tests. From py.test --help: -r chars show extra test summary info as specified by chars (f)ailed, (E)error, (s)skipped, (x)failed, (X)passed. Also see this part of the documentation about skipping: http://pytest.org/latest/skipping.html


9

The unittest.TestCase is a class. Feel free to subclass it with your own add-on features that allow you to "write less to achieve the same effects".


9

Additionally, with the recent addition of the "-m" command line option you should be able to write: py.test -m "not (slow or long)" IOW, the "-m" option accepts an expression which can make use of markers as boolean values (if a marker does not exist on a test function it's value is False, if it exists, it is True).


9

You can configure the --ignore option to your pytest.ini configuration like this maybe: addopts = --ignore=setup.py which should help if you are in the root directory and want py.test to ignore the setup.py file.


9

you can install the pytest-timeout plugin and then mark your test functions with a timeout in milliseconds. @pytest.mark.timeout(300) def test_foo(): pass Look at the plugin download and usage instructions at https://pypi.python.org/pypi/pytest-timeout


9

You could use this: import sys if 'threading' in sys.modules: del sys.modules['threading'] import gevent import gevent.socket import gevent.monkey gevent.monkey.patch_all()


9

The error is raised because of py.test capturing output. You should run py.test with -s option (turn off capture output). For example: py.test -s my_test.py


9

@hynekcer gave me the right idea. But basically the easiest solution lies somewhere else: Get rid of pytest-cov! Use coverage run --source jedi -m py.test coverage report instead!!! This way you're just running a coverage on your current py.test configuration, which works perfectly fine! It's also philosophically the right way to go: Make each program ...


9

I used to use Nose because it was the default with Pylons. I didn't like it at all. It had configuration tendrils in multiple places, virtually everything seemed to be done with an underdocumented plugin which made it all even more indirect and confusing, and because it did unittest tests by default, it regularly broke with Unicode tracebacks, hiding the ...


8

I use PYTHONPATH as PYTHONPATH=`pwd` py.test tests/my_module_test.py


8

pytest has the xdist plugin which provides the --boxed option to run each test in a controlled subprocess. Here is a basic example:: # content of test_module.py import pytest import os import time # run test function 50 times with different argument @pytest.mark.parametrize("arg", range(50)) def test_func(arg): time.sleep(0.05) # each tests takes a ...


7

Putting an __init__.py is one way of resolving the conflict. Unlike nose, current pytest does not try to unload test modules in order to import test modules with the same import name. I used to think it's a bit magic to do this auto-unimporting and might mess up people's expectation from what the import mechanism does; sometimes people rely on the global ...


7

In the default configuration, the test file should be named test_<something>.py. See Changing standard (Python) test discovery.


7

If i understand your question correctly, you basically want to select one instance of a parametrized fixture for executing with a test, by providing some info with the test. It's not possible although we could probably think about a mechanism. I am not sure if the following solution maps to your whole problem, but here is one way to solve the above ...


7

Something like assert round(x-y, 5) == 0 That is what unittest does For the second part assert all(round(x-y, 5) == 0 for x,y in zip((1.32, 2.4), i_return_tuple_of_two_floats())) Probably better to wrap that in a function def tuples_of_floats_are_almost_equal(X, Y): return all(round(x-y, 5) == 0 for x,y in zip(X, Y)) assert ...


7

yes, the source folder is not in python's path if you cd to the tests directory. you have 2 choices: a. Add the path manually to the test files, something like: import sys, os myPath = os.path.dirname(os.path.abspath(__file__)) sys.path.insert(0, myPath + '/../') b. run the tests with the env var PYTHONPATH=../.



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