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3

Yes! Green supports unittest's built-in unittest.skipIf(condition, reason) function, as well as the rest of the skip functions and exceptions like skip(), skipUnless(), and SkipTest. @unittest.skipIf(True, reason="Just skip all the tests in the test case.") class MyTestCase(unittest.TestCase): ... class MyOtherTestCase(unittest.TestCase): ...


2

I just tried your example verbatim and it worked fine in pytest 2.6.4. Perhaps you are misspelling parametrize? You misspelled it in the title and is a common mistake, as can be seen in this issue.


2

Solved with latest py.test version 2.6.4! Sorry... The actual problem was, this seemed to be a bug in pytest 2.6.0 The development environment in the project were we're using it is a bit outdated, and I simply did not realize the minor version difference between 2.6.0 (also shown in the example output) and 2.6.4


2

You need to add the marker names to your pytest.ini to register them. See http://pytest.org/latest/example/markers.html#registering-markers


1

Try something like this try: assert something==otherthing except: f=open(log,"a") f.write("Assertion failed comparing something to otherthing\n") f.close()


1

One approach is to manually inspect the generated image and if looks OK to you, save it next to the test and use a image diffing algorithm (for example ImageChops.difference) to obtain a threshold value that you can use to make sure future test runs are still drawing the same image. For example: # contents of conftest.py from PIL import ImageChops, ...


1

One solution is to use pytest.mark for that: @pytest.fixture def session(request): m = request.node.get_marker('session_config') if m is None: pytest.fail('please use "session_config" marker') specific_file = m.args[0] copy_config_file( specific_file ) link = spawn_exe() def fin(): close_down_exe() return link ...


1

yesterday I faced with the same issue and I resolved it :-) Official manual was helpful for me: http://pytest.org/latest/plugins.html#hook-specification-and-validation Magic for this realization that use special hook for pytest. It hook is "pytest_runtest_protocol" - implements the runtest_setup/call/teardown protocol for the given test item, including ...


1

To mock something simple like time.sleep I would use py.test's monkeypatch: def test_some_function(monkeypatch): monkeypatch.setattr(time, 'sleep', lambda s: None) data = some_sleepy_function() assert data == expected_data If you are grouping your tests in a class: class Test: def test_some_function(self, monkeypatch): ...


1

I think parametrized fixture is what will work for you very well: import pytest @pytest.fixture def backends(): """Mapping of possible backend ids to their constructor functions.""" return { 1: connect_to_backend_1, 2: connect_to_backend_2 } @pytest.fixture(scope="session", params=[1, 2]) def backend(request, backends): ...


1

pytest-xdist plugin gives you --boxed option, where each test is ran in own subprocess. You that to work around your test, and also to track resource usage (not sure how atm). Finally, it is quite possible that it is interaction of your tests and not a single test alone that piles up memory. You can use -k selector or pytest-random plugin's flag --random ...


1

If you're using django-rest-framework, then you can just use request.data instead of trying to parse json from the request yourself http://www.django-rest-framework.org/api-guide/requests/ stream = StringIO('[' + request.raw_post_data + ']') data = JSONParser().parse(stream) this can be replaced with data = request.data


1

In the test program, I believe you have to either Prefix the Person class with the module name: Person.Person(....) or Change the import to 'from Person import *'. In this case all the classes are imported as 'local'


1

Pytest captures stdout; print() writes to stdout and you'll only see the output if there is a test failure. Use the -s flag if you want to see stdout output instead: py.test -s



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