Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I found the answer. The major problem is py.test by default uses python2.6 and it also raises the error while executing "from Bio import PDB". However Python2.7 does not raise any error on executing same command. To make choice in choosing different version python. Standalone pytest script was created with command and then run py.test --genscript=curpytest ...


1

import looks in the following directories to find a module: The home directory of the program. This is the directory of your root script. When you are running pytest your home directory is where it is installed (/usr/local/bin probably). No matter that you are running it from your src directory because the location of your pytest determines your home ...


1

Fixtures don’t work like this. They cannot magically transfer the name a from one function’s (setup) local scope to another’s (test). Instead, your setup function must explicitly return the object that will be passed as the setup argument to your test function. For example: import pytest import random class TestSetup: def __init__(self): self.a ...


0

When running python, make sure your current working directory is the app directory, otherwise from Bio import PDB might have worked for other reasons. You can use os.chdir to move to the app directory, and then try importing and see if it still works. Also - where is Bio located? EDIT: According to your comment the issue is caused by using different ...


0

IIRC you can rely on higher scoped fixtures to be executed first. So if you created a session scoped autouse fixture to monkeypatch smtplib.SMTP.connect then you could create a function-scoped fixture which undoes this monkeypatching for one test, restoring it afterwards. I assume the easiest way to do this is create your own smtpserver fixture which ...


0

Are you using pytest-pycharm medule? Looks like it works for me. Create virtualenv, pip install pytest pytest-pycharm, use this virtualenv at PyCharm Edit configuration -> Python Interpreter and then run with Debug ... Example: import pytest def test_me(): assert None if __name__ == '__main__': pytest.main(args=[__file__]) PyCharm debugger ...


0

Yes, pytest is good framework for doing what are you needs. We are using pytest with requests and PyHamcrest. Look at this example: import pytest import requests from hamcrest import * class SiteImpl: def __init__(self, url): self.url = url def has_valid_cert(self): return requests.get(self.url, verify=True) @pytest.yield_fixture ...


0

Inspired by this answer, I have solved my problem. According to the django-pytest documentation for managing the python path: By default, pytest-django tries to find Django projects by automatically looking for the project’s manage.py file and adding its directory to the Python path. I assumed that executing py.test tests/test_browser.py inside ...


2

Take a look at the documentation about installing external plugins at http://pytest.org/latest/plugins.html#making-your-plugin-installable-by-others. Basically you create a python package with a setuptools entry point: # sample ./setup.py file from setuptools import setup setup( name="myproject", packages = ['myproject'] # the following makes ...


2

When you use the @pytest.mark.usefixtures marker you still need to provide a similarly named input argument if you want that fixture to be injected in to your test function. As described in the py.test docs for fixtures: The name of the fixture function can later be referenced to cause its invocation ahead of running tests... Test functions can ...


-1

In both cases, in the global scope user_setup refers to the function. The difference is, in your nonfixture version, you are creating a parameter with the same name, which is a classic recipe for confusion. In that nonfixture version, within in the scope of test_user, your user_setup identifier refers to whatever it is you are passing it, NOT the function ...


2

Unfortunately there is currently no way of doing this nicely. In the future py.test will introduce a new "any" scope or something similar for this, but that's the future. Right now you have to do this manually yourself. However as you note you loose quite a few nice features: symlinks in /tmp to the last test, auto cleanup after a few test runs, sensibly ...


1

It would have been useful to show or describe how it fails. However note that coverage and thus these options are provided by the pytest-cov plugin which needs to be installed separately: https://pypi.python.org/pypi/pytest-cov If that wasn't the problem then please update the question with more details.


1

The .setup_method() and .teardown_method() functions are the nose-compatibility options and they do not accept fixtures as parameters. Better would be to use an autouse fixture on the class: class Tests: @pytest.fixture(autouse=True) def do_stuff_based_on_var_one(self, var_one): if var_one: # do stuff else: ...



Top 50 recent answers are included