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24

The Cassandra project has been recommending that new projects use CQL for a few versions now, and with the advent of CQL 3 in Cassandra 1.1, I'd definitely recommend going right to that. Advantages include a more familiar syntax if you've used SQL before, and a commonality of interface between the different language CQL drivers. CQL is CQL, whether you use ...


10

Just ran across this thread, and found that the answer is out of date. CQL now exposes the internal timestamps using the writetime() function: select key,columnfoo,writetime(columnfoo) from tablebar;


9

The problem is that in your data model, you are using the time as a row key. Although this is possible, you won't get a meaningful ordering unless you also use the ByteOrderedPartitioner. For this reason, most people insert time-ordered data using the time as a column name, not a row key. In this model, your insert statement would look like: ...


9

Looks like you are using the uuid as the row key and not the column name. The 'compare_with: TimeUUIDType' attribute specifies that the column names will be compared with using the TimeUUIDType, i.e it tells Cassandra how to sort the columns for slicing operations Have you considered using any of the high level python clients? E.g. Tradedgy, Lazy Boy, ...


9

try: list(cf.get_range().get_keys()) more good stuff here: http://github.com/vomjom/pycassa


6

There is no wildcard support like this in Cassandra, but you can model your data in such a way that you could get the same end result. You would take the column that you want to perform this query on and denormalize it into a second column family. This CF would have a single wide row with the column name as the value of the col you want to do the wild card ...


5

Sounds like you are io-bottlenecked. Cassandra does about 4000 reads/s per core, IF your data fits in ram. Otherwise you will be seek-bound just like anything else. I note that normally "tuning the hell" out of a system is reserved for AFTER you start putting load on it. :) See: http://spyced.blogspot.com/2010/01/linux-performance-basics.html ...


5

The only working solution for me: open menu “Window” → “Preferences” → “Interpreter - Python”, then click button “Apply”, select your interpreter and then “OK”. Pydev will rescan all packages and in some seconds all unresolved imports disappear. Unfortunately I have to do these steps on every restart because Pydev always “forget” some packages after ...


5

The last comment on this page would help you. Apparently, modules require to be re-indexed when imported.


5

Is CQL3 truly the preferred method, and is Thrift being discouraged? Short answer is yes. Longer answer is: CQL3 should be preferred for many reasons: platform-agnostic language: CQL3 looks like SQL and is easier to handle that pure Thrift API code. Higher level of abstraction: for end-users, it's easier to deal with CQL3 to query data rather than ...


4

From the pycassa 1.0.8 documentation it would appear that you could use something like the following [pseudocode]: results = {} start = 0 startColumn = "" while True: # Fetch blocks of size 500 buffer = get(key, column_start=startColumn, column_finish="", column_count=100) # iterate returned values. # set startColumn == previous ...


4

No. Cassandra is widely expected to be more stable than that. If it is not stable, there is a substantial chance you have configured it wrong. It may be attempting to use more memory than you expect, for instance. If you have encountered a bug or defect in Cassandra, it is not one which is afflicting the majority of users. As for your "restart daemon" plan, ...


4

You probably don't want to be modifying column_validators directly. Those are set automatically based on the column_metadata properties of the column family. You can use the 'alter_column' command in pycassa to modify the column family schema in Cassandra. Then column_validators will be set correctly permanently. ...


4

It looks like you need to pass the substitutions in a dict as a single arg, not as keyword args. cursor.execute("select * from domain_dimension where key=:key", {'key': last_key}) That is how it specified in the example on the project homepage: http://code.google.com/a/apache-extras.org/p/cassandra-dbapi2/


4

You must ensure your column family schema accepts UUID as key. Your code will work with a column family created as (using cassandra-cli): create column family MyColumnFamily with column_type = 'Standard' and comparator = 'AsciiType' and default_validation_class = 'BytesType' and key_validation_class = 'TimeUUIDType'; To add values to this CF: ...


4

I would go with pycassa. We have been using it for quite a while and work pretty well.


4

It looks like the Cassandra process is being shut down, presumably from being sent a signal. These lines are what indicate that: INFO [StorageServiceShutdownHook] 2012-07-31 12:44:26,679 CassandraDaemon.java (line 218) Stop listening to thrift clients INFO [StorageServiceShutdownHook] 2012-07-31 12:44:26,762 MessagingService.java (line 539) Waiting for ...


4

Make sure your values match your column family type. It appears your column family either is a BytesType or has no type associated with it, so pycassa will only accept string values. You can map all your values to str with a list comprehension with a nested dict comprehension (the latter requires python 2.7 and up): cf.insert(uuid.uuid4(), [{k: str(v) for ...


4

You can try: cf.get_range(column_count=0,filter_empty=False). # Since get_range() returns a generator - print only the keys. for value in cf.get_range(column_count=0,filter_empty=False): print value[0]


4

If you have created your tables using CQL3 and you want to access them through a thrift based client; you will have to specify the Compact Storage property. e.g : CREATE TABLE dummy_file_test ( dtPtn INT, pxID INT, startTm INT, endTm INT, patID BIGINT, efile BLOB, PRIMARY KEY((dtPtn, pxID, ...


3

Simple answer: there is no equivalent of LIKE http://www.datastax.com/docs/0.8/dml/using_cql Here is the command reference for v0.8: http://www.datastax.com/docs/0.8/references/cql#cql-reference If you maintain another set of rows that hold references to a username: row: username:bab -> col:babu1, col:babar row: username:babu -> col:babur ...


3

Thrift really has two (kinds of) components: there's the Thrift compiler, which generates code given an interface, and then there are the per-language libraries, which implement the low-level thrift protocols and transports for each language. You almost certainly don't need the Thrift compiler, which is what you linked to. You do need the Thrift python ...


3

If know all the components of the composite column then you should the 'columns' option: cf.get('1234', columns=[('20120216', 'finalscore')]) You said you got an error trying to do this, but I would suggest trying again. It works fine for me. When you are slicing composite columns you need to think about how they are sorted. Composite columns sort ...


3

The comparator for a column family is used for ordering the columns within each row. You are seeing that error because 'somedata' is valid utf-8 but not a valid uuid. The ordering of the rows stored in cassandra is determined by the partitioner. Most likely you are using RandomPartitioner which distributes load evenly across your cluster but does not allow ...


3

It's not recommended to use column Cassandra timestamps directly in client code; ideally, you should add your own timestamps in whatever form is most appropriate to your schema. But if you really want to, it can be done through the thrift interface (and, by extension, certain libraries using the thrift interface). For the pycassa case, you just need to add ...


3

You need to use the super_column parameter. cf.remove('key', super_column='super_column', columns=['sub_column']) With that said, @the paul's advice is definitely sound.


3

ByteOrderedPartitioner orders by bytes, as the name suggests. Since the "time" component of a version 1 uuid is not the first bytes, this is NOT the same as TimeUUID ordering. I suggest reading up on time series modeling in Cassandra: http://rubyscale.com/blog/2011/03/06/basic-time-series-with-cassandra/ and ...


3

If you are using multiprocessing, pycassa.pool is not multiprocessing-safe. I was receiving "TApplicationException: get_slice failed: unknown result" under similar circumstances. I created multiple pycassa.pools, one pool per process, and the problem appears solved. The documentation has a special page to advise us about multiprocessing and pools, but it ...


3

Sounds like your client is not saturating Cassandra. If Cassandra isn't CPU, i/o, or network bound, this is your problem. Rule of thumb is that it takes about 1 client machine for 2 Cassandra servers to saturate it at one replica. (So, about 1:4 for 2.) Multiply the number of clients by 5-10 if you're not using a "fast" language like Java; for Python, ...


3

(Answer copied from the same question on the pycassa mailing list.) Last failure was timeout: timed out This indicates a client-side timeout, so adjusting read_request_timeout_in_ms won't fix this. Instead, adjust the timeout parameter for your ConnectionPool; the default is 0.5 seconds. For really wide rows, you may also want to experiment with ...



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