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3

There's nothing wrong with the random number generator. cell.rect.x and cell.rect.y are integers, while cell.speed is not. When you add cell.speed to cell.rect.x or cell.rect.y, the result is rounded -- probably with a floor function, hence the bias towards the upper left. Notice that if you hard-code the cell speed as 1 (or any integer), the problem ...


2

In this bit of code: if char.rect.right < 800: idle = 0 char.rect = char.rect.move(right) char = pygame.image.load("right_n.png") In the line: char = pygame.image.load("right_n.png") You are overwriting your char and assigning a pygame.Surface to it. So on the next iteration of the game loop it fails.


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Hi I had the same problems. I Just used the normal pygame download (http://www.pygame.org/download.shtml) and it worked just fine despite not being 64bit Here is a link a link for the unafishal download that may have what you are looking for: http://www.lfd.uci.edu/~gohlke/pythonlibs/#pygame hope you can get it to work for you (-:


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You are not importing pygame the framework, you are importing pygame.py, a file in the same directory: import pygame File "/home/hanisek/pygame.py", line 3 Remove or rename that file.


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Ok, so I agree with Sloth, but instead of doing all the screen updating and filling and blitting at the end, making the script less readable, you should make like an animate function that runs at the end of the while loop each time, and put the blitting and screen updating stuff in that function. Sorry for the run-on sentence. Oh and you don't need your ...


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You can use collision response rect2 = pygame.draw.rect(screen, green, [lead_x,lead_y, 50, 50]) rect1 = pygame.draw.rect(screen, blue, [lead_x1,lead_y1, 50 ,50]) if rect2.colliderect(rect1): print("BOOM!") If you want the coordinates: print(rect2.left,rect2.right,rect2.top,rect2.bottom) These are the attributes you can use taken ...


1

Python is indentation sensitive. In your code, you call pygame.display.update() only once your main loop ends. Also, you only paint the background white in the case there's an event in the event queue between the two for loops, and then you fill the background for every event in the queue. Note that this could also lead to a situation in which your QUIT ...


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You could try to load the images of your guns before the while loop and save a reference to them, this way you don't have to load the image on the fly every time.


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Perhaps something along these lines (untested): with open('image.jps', 'rb') as imgfile: imgbuf = StringIO(imgfile.read()) image1 = pygame.image.load(imgbuf) Since you say it works, you could probably shorten things as shown below since there's no reason to give the image buffer a name and keep it around: with open('image.jps', 'rb') as imgfile: ...


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No idea on what the last field in the second line means. The rest can be deduced easily: def read_off(file): if 'OFF' != file.readline().strip(): throw 'Not a valid OFF header' n_verts, n_faces, n_dontknow = tuple([int(s) for s in file.readline().strip().split(' ')]) verts = [] for i_vert in range(n_verts): ...


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Yes, you can get rid of most of the event handling, you can generalize your main loop, and you can get rid of some fields of your Character class. See my explanatory notes in the comments: import pygame import sys from pygame.locals import * SCREENX = 640 SCREENY = 480 class Character(pygame.sprite.Sprite): def __init__(self, image_file): ...



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