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3

This line: pygame.sprite.Sprite().__init__(self) is almost certainly wrong. You want to call the method on the class, not an instance. pygame.sprite.Sprite.__init__(self)


3

The problem is that you canĀ“t get any events for the amount of time the game pauses when you use for instance the pygame.time.wait() or pygame.time.delay() functions of the PyGame time module. To avoid this problem you could create your very own event which appears on the event queue every given number of milliseconds. You could use pygame.time.set_timer() ...


2

Try this, half your code should be global, this is a scope issue. See here for more. class Wall (object): def __init__(self,pos): walls.append(self) self.rect = pygame.Rect(pos[0], pos[1], 16, 16) x = 0 y = 0 for row in level: for col in row: if col == 'W': Wall((x, y)) if col == "E": ...


2

You should give function lines a keyword argument (width=2). Invoke function lines like this: pygame.draw.lines(Field2, BLACK, True, LON, 2) Here is link for how to use this function.


2

I assume that you understand how to create a server using a protocol and how asynchronous paradigm work. All you need is to break down your while event loop into handlers. Let's see server case and client case : Server case A client (server-side) You need to create a what we call a protocol, it will be used to create the server and serve as a pattern ...


2

If you use that method, you will need to define the dimensions of the level - LEVELWIDTH and LEVELHEIGHT, in this case 8 and 6, then you can find the block at x, y with this code: LEVELWIDTH = 8 LEVELHEIGHT = 6 def GetBlock(x, y): return level[x * LEVELWIDTH + y] remembering that the indexes x and y both start at zero and end with the last item at ...


2

(Full disclosure, I'm not familiar with the pygame package, but I have done this sort of programming in other languages) Discussion When you want a player to determine how much it should rotate to face an object, the player should consider itself to be the world center. However, its coordinates are not always going to be (0,0). We first need to transform ...


2

You're computing the difference between the angle between the screen and the mouse and the angle between the sprite and its position. That's not what you want. I'd propose: angleRad = math.atan2(self.rect.y-mY, mX-self.rect.x) # y is reversed due to top-left coordinate system That's the absolute angle that the sprite should have to look at the mouse ...


2

You can draw it using lines. You only need to generate list of vertices with simple trygonometry. Something like this (if I didn't make a mistake): def draw_ngon(Surface, color, n, radius, position): pi2 = 2 * 3.14 for i in range(0, n): pygame.draw.line(Surface, color, position, (cos(i / n * pi2) * radius + position[0], sin(i / n * pi2) * ...


2

Your error is that you called pygame.QUIT. Or, pygame.QUIT is a number. So you get an error. you must do it like this: ... if Event.type == pygame.QUIT: ...


2

There are many different approaches for that problem. :) A very simple and quick and dirty method is to pause the game (i.e. set a delay) in the main game loop for an amount of time. You could use PyGames pygame.time.delay() function: #import pygame and randint function from random module import pygame from random import randint pygame.init() screen = ...


2

map is a python built-in function. Using map as a function name thus leads to confusion, so you should consider renaming your map function to something different. Also, what you call "map class" only defines a function, not a class. Did you perhaps confuse def with class in the class definition?


1

Note does not work in Android 5.x. I know this is an old post but I have a also encountered this problem. zenopython's answer will work with some tweaking as there is a mistake in the mixer module. If you look in the anroid.mixer module and look at the music class you will see. @staticmethod def get_busy(): return music_channel.get_volume() as you ...


1

Just replace " in pet[0] with an empty string. pet.append(pygame.image.load('//home/me/Desktop/Python/'+pet[0].replace('"', "")+'.png') Example: >>> animals = {'dog': '"Dog" 4 "Bone"', 'cat': '"Cat" 4 "Yarn"', 'parrot': '"Parrot" 2 "Bell"'} >>> pet = animals['dog'].split() >>> ...


1

It's shorthand for Surface, which is frequently used in PyGame. http://www.pygame.org/docs/ref/surface.html


1

Yes you can, use Picasso library for loading the images. I had the same problem with OutOfMemory exceptions, but this library solved my problem. Download the Jar file and include it to your project, but before that make sure you read the documentation, it's very short and simple especially the IMAGE TRANSFORMATION part.


1

The problem here is that the pygame developers have not uploaded pygame to PyPI. So to install it, you will have to download it and pip install the downloaded source, as described in the tutorial you linked. You can do this within the Anaconda Python. Note that in the Anaconda Python, even if it is Python 3, pip is just called pip, not pip3.


1

In the same way that e.g. hexadecimal uses 'a' for 10, 'b' for 11, and so on, just use letters for numbers beyond 9: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 a b c d e f g h i j One advantage of this is that int in Python already implements this for bases beyond 10: >>> int('a', 20) 10 >>> int('j', 20) 19 >>> int('hi', 20) 358 which simplifies ...


1

I would probably end up using something like this. This will still popup a screen but it will be tiny and never updated. import pygame from pygame.locals import * pygame.init() def circle_drawing(surf): pass #your circle drawing function using passed in surface DISPLAY = (1, 1) DEPTH = 32 FLAGS = 0 screen = pygame.display.set_mode(DISPLAY, ...


1

If you don't want a window to appear, try creating the surface like this: screen = pygame.Surface((width,height)) Then you can draw your circles on this surface and save it the same way as you did before. As others have said, clear the surface with the fill() method.


1

It seems after a little debugging that the image file was actually in a subfolder. In order to load the image, you'll need to provide a more exact path to the file by changing this line image = pygame.image.load('player.png').convert() like so: image = pygame.image.load('subfolder' + os.sep + 'player.png').convert() Don't forget to add an import os ...


1

The reason why you are not moving the sprite is because you are not changing any variables with the events. Specifically the location variable spriteDrawPos is not changing because the line spriteDrawPos = (SPHpos[0] - w // 2, SPHpos[1] - h // 2) which modifies it is not changing because SPHpos is never going to change because spriteROT never changes. To ...


1

Change size = width,height = 128,160 to size = width,height = 160,128


1

I think it is related to your conditional statement: if ball_x == barHitX2 + 1040 and ball_y >= barY2 and ball_y <= barY2 + 200: ball_x = 1058 and incrementing by 5 and 10. I don't think you want to check if ball_x is exactly barHitX2 + 1040, but rather if ball_x is within a "barHitX2 range". (i.e.) if (ball_x >= BarHitX2 + 1040 and ball_x ...


1

I had the same problem for one of my own programs. I don't know why but a layer attribute is not recognized by the sprite group. My solution was to pass the layer to the group.add() method using a key word argument like so: class player(pygame.sprite.Sprite): layer = 1 def __init__ (self): pygame.sprire.Sprite.__init__(self) ...


1

This will help you read the file with open('highscore.txt') as f: lines = f.readlines() Lines is an array where each element is a line in your text file. I'm not sure what kind of format your file is in but this might help you: http://www.tutorialspoint.com/python/string_split.htm


1

Here's a basic example of a working class that dispatches events. #!/usr/bin/python import pyglet from time import time, sleep class Window(pyglet.window.Window): def __init__(self, refreshrate): super(Window, self).__init__(vsync = False) self.frames = 0 self.framerate = pyglet.text.Label(text='Unknown', font_name='Verdana', ...


1

My friend just showed me what I need to do. Apparently I just need to install it from the Pygame site's installer. Mystery solved.


1

You blit your text "cheeeeeeeese" (variable L6 in your program) onto the display surface D, update it (call pygame.display.update()), and right after that, you fill the whole surface by calling D.fill(MEXON). The result: every time an event occurs the text flashes up short, because you "clear" the screen by calling pygames fill() function immediately after ...


1

Py is the y coordinate of the point P. This is shown in the diagram at the top of the page where it says P (Px, Py).



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