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0

Solved, just needed to attach the image directly to the table like: self.table.attach(image,0,1,0,1) and works perfectly :D


2

GtkEntry is not a container, so it cannot have child widgets. The appropriate way to implement what you see in the screenshot is to use a separate container and style it appropriately.


1

Have you considered putting the entry inside a frame, and restyling stuff to make it look like it was inside an entry? Then you could use standard containers to put whatever widgets next to the text entry spaces that you wanted. The downside is that clicking your "icon" doesn't focus the entry automatically, but it makes that action totally configurable.


1

self is not self.window. In fact, subclassing Gtk.Dialog for your case is useless as the dialog part of self is never used! If you are requiring a new enough version of GTK+, you can create your dialog as a composite widget template and build your class that way (I don't know how to do this with Python; sorry). Otherwise, get rid of the subclass and call ...


1

I had a similar problem trying to install pygi. I believe in order for the installation to detect Python you need to make sure that Python is in your system path. You can look up how to do this or just re-run the Python installation again. The problem I had is that once I installed pygi, importing gi failed.


0

Solved. After a lot of searching I found the answer. 'gst.parse_launch' requires a Source which feeds into a Filter which passes to a Sink. 'Source -> Filter -> Sink'. In my program the filter was missing. Once added the code functions. So changing this line self.player = gst.parse_launch ("v4l2src ! autovideosink") to this self.player = ...


4

To make the line around the EventBox, it is possible to put it into the Frame or another EventBox (in this case it is possible to set the width of the "border"), here is how it looks: And here is the code (it is a modified EventBox example): #!/usr/bin/env python # example eventbox.py import pygtk pygtk.require('2.0') import gtk class EventBoxExample: ...


0

Not sure if this is the cause of your problem, but your gtk.threads_init() and gtk.main() statements are in the wrong place. They should be either side of your instantiation of Application(), rather than in the class definition: if __name__ == "__main__": gtk.gdk.threads_init() # Here, or immediately after the imports Application() gtk.main() ...


0

If you replace your empty border-style with simply no border like: border: none; does the problem persist?


2

The most likely cause of the crash is that your code invokes GTK code from threads other than the thread that runs the main loop, which the documentation states is not allowed. To resolve the issue, replace the call of gui2.textinit() with GLib.idle_add(gui2.textinit) (note the lack of parentheses after textinit). Several remarks about the code: The ...


1

After you first activate your virtual environment, you need to install any packages you require (for example, pip install pep8-naming) When you create a virtual environment, it basically acts as a separate standalone installation of python. If you previously installed gtk (or any other package) in the global Python 2.6 instance, that is not available within ...


0

The closest I've been able to get is a bit of a kludge. I use Perl, not Python, so I'll just describe my technique. Connect to the treeview's scroll-event signal and watch for direction=left/right (or smooth with get_scroll_deltas() returning non-zero for the X axis). Be sure to return FALSE for vertical scrolling so that remains unaffected. Then ...


0

If you have the window id, you can do this: from gtk import gdk window = gdk.window_foreign_new(0x...) # Replace ... with the hexadecimal ID window.move(0, 0) # Moves window to the top-left corner window.fullscreen() Have fun!



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