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8

As far as I know, there is no Python library for this, so you're going to be calling native APIs. The good news is that PyObjC (which comes with the built-in Python on recent OS releases) often makes that easy. There are two major options. For either of these to work, your app has to have a Cocoa/CoreFoundation runloop (just as in Windows, a lot of things ...


5

Just for future reference, you can use pythoncom.PumpWaitingMessages() inside the while loop, since it does not lock the execution. Something like this: while True: # your code here pythoncom.PumpWaitingMessages()


4

A quick google turned up this site, which has unofficial installers for pyHook 1.5.1 (and a whole lot of other packages) for Python 3.3. I haven't tested it, but it seems worth trying. And there are a couple of other similar repositories on the first page of Google results if this one doesn't work. I also found a few forks on github, like this one, which ...


3

Okay, how about this? Add a return True to DeleteRun: def DeleteRun(event): Click(1250, 741) time.sleep(0.1) [...] return True I should probably confess that this was little more than google-fu: read the answer to this question.


2

From the pyhook tutorial: Any application that wishes to receive notifications of global input events must have a Windows message pump. However, this shouldn't necessarily prevent your code from working. Why don't you post what you are trying to do, and we can look for a way to use the message pump in the context of your code. One way you might be ...


2

From the documentation for WH_MOUSE_LL: wParam [in] Type: WPARAM The identifier of the mouse message. This parameter can be one of the following messages: WM_LBUTTONDOWN, WM_LBUTTONUP, WM_MOUSEMOVE, WM_MOUSEWHEEL, WM_MOUSEHWHEEL, WM_RBUTTONDOWN, or WM_RBUTTONUP. As pyhook uses the WH_MOUSE_LL hook it seems it is limited to these three buttons. Following ...


2

Split on whitespace followed by a digit, like this: >>> part1, part2 = re.split(r'\s(?=\d)', " This year is 2014", 1) >>> part1, part2 (' This year is', '2014')


1

PostQuitMessage has to be posted from the same thread. To do so you need to introduce a global variable STOP_KEY_HANDLER. If you want to quit then just set global STOP_KEY_HANDLER = True from any thread you want and it will quit with the next keystroke. Your key handler has to run on the main thread. STOP_KEY_HANDLER = False def main(): pass # here do ...


1

I guess pbackup's solution is fine. Just to conclude I found a solution by simply sending a key myself instead of waiting for the user to input. It's proably not the best but was the fastest an goes parallel in my timing thread with the other timing routines. STOP_KEY_HANDLER = True # send key to kill handler - not pretty but works for hwnd in ...


1

Try remove pythoncom.PumpMessages() From pyHook turorial said: When run, this program just sits idle and waits for Windows events. If you are using a GUI toolkit (e.g. wxPython), this loop is unnecessary since the toolkit provides its own.


1

You have to "unhook" the hooks that you created to do a proper exit. To terminate the "pythoncom.PumpMessages()" ever-lasting-loop: if chr(event.Ascii) == 'q': ctypes.windll.user32.PostQuitMessage(0) The following code works correctly on Windows 7 with Python 2.7.6. I haven't yet figured out how to make it work under Python 3.4, but I'll be ...


1

You are installing a Wheel created for Python 3.4, into Python 2.7. That won't work. Use the correct version and download the one with cp27 in the name: pyHook‑1.5.1‑cp27‑none‑win_amd64.whl


1

This line should be the culprit: <link href="{{STATIC_URL}}/style.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" /> Remove the trailing slash after {{STATIC_URL}} You should say <link href="{{STATIC_URL}}style.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" /> Can you make sure STATICFILES_DIRS refer to your static directory. from django.conf import ...


1

you could use .getsize. >>> import os >>> b = os.path.getsize("/path/isa_005.mp3") >>> b 2071611L


1

This seems to solve your problem: def OnClose(self, event): self.hm.UnhookMouse() event.Skip() I don't know why because the doc says the destructor unhooks all registered hooks, too.


1

You will have to use pythoncom.PumpWaitingMessages which is not blocking. import pythoncom as pc, pyHook as ph import time def KeyboardHook(event): print chr(event.Ascii) return True hm = ph.HookManager() hm.KeyDown = KeyboardHook hm.HookKeyboard() while time.clock() < 5: pc.PumpWaitingMessages()


1

If you want to catch KeyboardInterrupt exceptions, you could use a nested loop. This way when a KeyboardInterrupt occurs, the program exits only the inner loop. while True: try: while True: pythoncom.PumpWaitingMessages() except KeyboardInterrupt: pass


1

you can try python schedulers to call your methods on given interval. You may want to look at this module: http://packages.python.org/APScheduler/


1

After more google-searching I found a solution that worked for me: pyHook + pythoncom stop working after too much keys pressed [Python]. I tried his first suggestion, and my problem appears solved. The pyHook part of my code now looks as below. import pythoncom, pyHook, win32api, sys import math import threading, time from time import sleep ... #attempt to ...


1

Similar (dare I say identical?) problems were discussed and resolved here: pyHook + pythoncom stop working after too much keys pressed [Python] and here: Pyhook stops capturing key events after 6 presses


1

If you're insterested in Windows only, you can use win API, e.g. via ctypes: >>> from ctypes import windll >>> windll.user32.RegisterHotKey(0, -1, 0x0002, 0x5a) After running these lines of code Ctrl (code = 0x0002) + Z (code = 0x5a) combination doesn't work any more in Python REPL. So you should better look at what windows are those ...


1

From the information that Tkinter needs to run in the main thread and not be called outside this thred, I found a solution: My problem was that both PumpMessages and mainLoop needed to run in the main thread. In order to both receive inputs and show a Tkinter label with the amount of clicks I need to switch between running pumpMessages and briefly running ...


1

In python, Ctrl+C throws a KeyboardInterrupt exception. http://docs.python.org/2/library/exceptions.html#exceptions.KeyboardInterrupt


1

First problem You do create two Threads - but the target of the second is the return value of OnKeyboardEvent(event). This has no return-statement, so the return value is None, so the Thread has no target. Second problem Your code never reaches the if __name__ == "__main__":-part. It blocks on pythoncom.PumpMessages(), at least for me. Third problem At ...



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