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3

If you use prepared statements in your SQL, you can't put multiple values for one placeholder/parameter/bind variable! Beside this you can use placeholders/parameters/bind variables only in place of literals, you can't use it for part of SQL statement which is not a literal. In your case you tried to put ( and ) which is part of SQL, but not a literal as ...


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The best way to handle this is to use the pyodbc function executemany. ds1Cursor.execute(selectSql) result = ds1Cursor.fetchall() ds2Cursor.executemany('INSERT INTO [TableName] (Col1, Col2, Col3) VALUES (?, ?, ?)', result) ds2Cursor.commit()


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You can do alignment and space padding with the normal python string formatting >>> '{:<15}:{:>15}'.format('column1', 'column2') 'column1 : column2' If you want to make the padding variable width = len(row) fmt_str = '{{:<{0}}}:{{:>{0}}}'.format(width) fmt_str.format('column1', 'column2')


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In case someone is having the same issue. I was able to find out what the problems was. When you open a connection with DSN, the autocommit is set to False. For some reason, this should be True for the code to work (this depends largely on what I was doing on MSSQL). import pyodbc conn = pyodbc.connect(r'DSN=myDSN', autocommit=True) cursor = conn.cursor() ...


2

From the pandas read_sql docs: "params: List of parameters to pass to execute method". The params needs to be a list (or tuple), and hence the string is interpreted as a list of 4 single characters. But this can be solved easily: pd.read_sql(query1, cnxn, params=[testid])


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SELECT like this? SELECT COLUMN_NAME,* FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS WHERE TABLE_SCHEMA='dbo' and TABLE_NAME = 'YourTableName'


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The error message Conversion failed when converting the varchar value 'a' to data type int. reveals that your code can be "fooled" into thinking that a column is integer when it is really text, presumably because it only looks at the first row of data. Testing reveals that both ID,txt1,txt2,int1 1,foo,123,3 2,bar,abc,4 and "ID","txt1","txt2","int1" ...


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The below is a full example with connection details but is SQL Server specific. Because you're using ORACLE, you can steal the df_query part. The point I'm trying to illustrate here is that you can use string formatting for parameter values instead of using params in your connection string. import os import sqlalchemy as sa import urllib import pandas as ...


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pyodbc (or pypyodbc) can do be used to set up the connection. The accepted answer to pyodbc requires python 3.3 describes how to install pyodbc. Also posted there is my experience (an exception was thrown) when using that method to successfully install 64-bit pyobdc for Python 3.5.1.on Win 7 Enterprise SP1. Here's a summary of the method: 1 - Go to ...


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This worked for me: conda install -c anaconda pyodbc=3.0.10 Also, check here to make sure you'll install the latest version https://anaconda.org/anaconda/pyodbc


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You need to install a pre-requisite package to built pyodbc. On RHEL: sudo yum install unixODBC-devel If you're connecting to SQL Server, don't forget FreeTDS: sudo yum install freetds-devel Good luck!


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Your query runs once with one argument. If you want to run for multiple dates either use "IN" clause, this will require to modify query_args a bit. "SELECT date FROM table WHERE date in (TO_DATE(?, 'DD/MM/YYYY'), TO_DATE(?, 'DD/MM/YYYY'))" query_args = ( ('29/04/2016','28/04/2016'), ) or cursor through each date argument: while ...


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You have to make sure the Python version matches the ODBC driver version: 32-bit with 32-bit, 64-bit with 64-bit. It looks like you have 64-bit Python / pyodbc and 32-bit MS Access. What you'll need to do is install the 32-bit Python version, and then install pyodbc. Good luck!



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