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11

Buffers are CL's version of malloc, while pyopencl.array.Array is a workalike of numpy arrays on the compute device. So for the second version of the first part of your question, you may write a_gpu + 2 to get a new arrays that has 2 added to each number in your array, whereas in the case of the Buffer, PyOpenCL only sees a bag of bytes and cannot perform ...


8

This can be achieved by adding __local array as a kernel parameter: __kernel void test(__global int **values, __global int *result, const int array_size, __local int * cache) and providing desired size of the kernel parameter: clSetKernelArg(kernel, 3, array_size*sizeof(int), NULL); The local memory will be allocated upon the kernel invocation. ...


6

You are setting your global size argument incorrectly. Since you are using two dimensions of global size in your kernel, you need to set your global size to (ORDER,ORDER). When you change it to that, you get: [3942 7236 4756 8611]


6

This is definitely a memory access problem. Neighbouring work items' pixels can overlap by as much as 15x16, and worse yet, each work item will overlap at least 225 others. I would use local memory and get work groups to cooperatively process many 16x16 blocks. I like to use a large, square block for each work group. Rectangular blocks are a bit more ...


5

In OpenCL 1.2 you link different object files together.


5

It seems you are looking for the fastest and most effective path to learn PyOpenCL. You do not need to know OpenCL (the hard part) at the start, but it will be helpful to know Python when you begin. For learning Python syntax quickly, I recommend Codecademy's Python track: http://www.codecademy.com/tracks/python Then, the Udacity parallel programming ...


4

Irrespective of the language of adoption for GPGPU computing such as Java,C/C++, Python, I would recommend you first get started with the basics of GPGPU computing and OpenCL. You can use the following resources all are C/C++ oriented but this should you give enough knowledge about OpenCL, GPGPU hardware to get you started. AMD OpenCL University Tool kit ...


4

According to the PyOpenCL documentation, Context takes a list of devices, not a specific device. If you change your context creation code to this: platform = cl.get_platforms() my_gpu_devices = platform[0].get_devices(device_type=cl.device_type.GPU) ctx = cl.Context(devices=my_gpu_devices) It should work. If you really want to limit the choice to only ...


4

I found what was causing this error. In pyopencl __init__ there is a function called _find_pyopencl_include_path, it is quite self explanatory what it does. To make a long story short: the imp module fails to find the pyopencl module. To fix this I commented out that line and set pathname to the path to pyopencls include directory. Probably not a good fix. ...


4

My opinion is that trying to shoehorn a dynamic language into OpenCL is not worth the effort. You will lose most of what you like about Python, and probably not save much time for your effort in the end. But I am speaking only of writing OpenCL kernels in Python. There is also the host application, which prepares and submits the kernels. If you like Python, ...


4

Optimization #1: make vector __local. My first pass at this got a decent improvement in performance. I noticed that each vector[k] is read a total of D times, so I copied it to a __local. This is only possible because D is small enough to allow this. The kernel as you have it above suffers from a terrible ALU:fetch ratio of 0.08 on both the 5870 and the ...


4

Making this an answer since it seems to fully answer the question. You normally create the buffer in device memory, and you can reuse these buffers by redefining the kernel arguments via clSetKernelArg() (unless, of course, you want to use them at the same time which is trickier, and I'm not sure it's even allowed by the OpenCL standard in fact).


4

PyOpenCL (for Python) and OpenCL (for C/C++) are just frameworks. You choose the framework based on the language you're using for your application. Neither of these has Image Processing algorithms pre-built. If you want image processing algorithms, then try libraries that are built on top of OpenCL. I work on ArrayFire for OpenCL that has image ...


3

If you're using nvidia instead of ATI/AMD GPU, the OpenCL support in nvidia SDK is...less than desired. Intel provides a CPU-based OpenCL SDK for their recent processors, see http://software.intel.com/en-us/vcsource/tools/opencl-sdk-2013 -- (to use the RPM packages they provide on Ubuntu, you need to run "fakeroot alien --to-deb" on each package, then "dpkg ...


3

CL_DEVICE_MAX_PARAMETER_SIZE refers to the max size of a kernel parameter passed to clSetKernelArg. See CL_DEVICE_MAX_MEM_ALLOC_SIZE and CL_DEVICE_GLOBAL_MEM_SIZE in clGetDeviceInfo.


3

I don't think OpenCL has a concept of multiple source files in a program - a program is one compilation unit. You can, however, use #include and pull in headers or other .cl files at compile time. You can have multiple kernels in an OpenCL program - so, after one compilation, you can invoke any of the set of kernels compiled. Any code not used - functions, ...


3

To answer the first question, Buffer(hostbuf=...) can be called with anything that implements the buffer interface (reference). pyopencl.array.to_device(...) must be called with an ndarray (reference). ndarray implements the buffer interface and works in either place. However, only hostbuf=... would be expected to work with for example a bytearray (which ...


3

The local-work-size, aka work-group-size, is the number of work-items in each work-group. Each work-group is executed on a compute-unit which is able to handle a bunch of work-items, not only one. So when you are using too small groups you waste some computing power, and only got a coarse parallelization at the compute-unit level. But if you have too many ...


3

The main(ish) point in GPU computing is trying to utilize hardware parallelism as much as possible. Instead of using the loop, launch a kernel with a different thread for every one of the coordinates. Then, either use atomic operations (the quick-to-code, but slow-performance option), or parallel reduction, for the various sums. AMD has A tutorial on this ...


3

You said it crashed on a line like this: s = zeros((A,B,C),complex128) With A=2400, B=256, C=25. That would require 235 MB of memory. And not just any 235 MB: it must be contiguous, because NumPy expects to use it as a single array. You also mentioned you're running this in a 32-bit process, and that it crashes when the process memory usage gets around ...


2

OpenCL uses precompiled programs, that later sent to device for execution. They are so-called "kernels". These kernels are deployed to be executed on end-device. This means main cost that must be measured is OpenCL implementation API I/O. Therefore, you can't rely on memory/CPU measurements, as real OpenCL part will use same of them. AFAIK, no benchmarks ...


2

It is likely that PyOpenCL is your best choice. I would choose to use C only in very specific situations (a super-critical need for speed/low-latency on the host). For most casual parallel programs, it is fine for the host side to have plenty of slack, because all the real work gets done on the device. You can consider PyOpenCL and OpenCL to have ...


2

clCreateSubDevices was introduced in OCL 1.2. Last time I've check NVIDIA was still not supporting OCL 1.2. Maybe it changed lately... better check. You can use the class pyopencl.Device to query which version of OCL is available to you. Documentation here.


2

There is a mismatch between the datatypes your are using in Python and OpenCL. In numpy, a uint8 is an 8-bit unsigned integer (which I presume is what you were after). In OpenCL, a uint8 is an 8-element vector of 32-bit unsigned integers. The correct datatype for an 8-bit unsigned integer in OpenCL is just uchar. So, your astype(numpy.uint8) is fine, but it ...


2

Check if your opencl runtime or opencl driver or opencl SDK is installed successfully.. I got the same error msg because I forgot to install the opencl runtime and the opencl driver for intel core (intel graphic hd 4400), though you think the runtime is installed with nividia driver. Intel provides ...


2

Your second case is only capturing the time taken to enqueue the kernel, not to actually run it. These enqueue kernel calls return as soon as the kernel invocation has been placed in the queue - the kernel will be run asynchronously with your host code. To time the kernel execution as well, just add a call to wait until all enqueued commands have finished: ...


2

No, there is no guaranty that address spaces match. For the basic types (float, int,…) you have alignment requirement (section 6.1.5 of the standard) and you have to use the cl_type name of the OpenCL implementation (when programming in C, pyopencl does the job under the hood I’d say). For the pointers it’s even simpler due to this mismatch. The very ...


2

Edit: extending the answer, making it maximally detailed. There are two ways to do that: (metaprogramming) Add your preprocessor directives directly to the string with the source code, or even run your own preprocessor using some templating engine. import pyopencl as cl import numpy import numpy.linalg as la a = ...


2

You can pass such a structure, but it will be pointless because x, y and z point to different memory regions. Each of these memory buffers must be transferred on its own.



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