Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

NVIDIA have a whitepaper for the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti, which is worth a read. An OpenCL compute unit translates to a streaming multiprocessor in NVIDIA GPU terms. Each Maxwell SMM in your GPU contains 128 processing elements ("CUDA cores") - and 128*5 = 640. The SIMD width of the device is still 32, but each compute unit (SMM) can issue instructions to ...


3

Your second case is only capturing the time taken to enqueue the kernel, not to actually run it. These enqueue kernel calls return as soon as the kernel invocation has been placed in the queue - the kernel will be run asynchronously with your host code. To time the kernel execution as well, just add a call to wait until all enqueued commands have finished: ...


2

Yes, there absolutely is - you can profile the individual PyOpenCL events run on the Device, and you can also profile the overall program on the Host. PyOpenCL events are returned by copying memory to the device, running a kernel on the device, and copying memory back from the device. Here is an example of profiling a Device event: event = ...


2

The order in which values are reduced will likely be very different between these two methods. Across large data sets, the tiny errors in floating point rounding can soon add up. There could also be other details about the underlying implementations that affect the precision of the result. I've run your example code on my own machine and get a similar sort ...


2

When you specify extern __shared__ float sdata[]; you are telling the compiler that the caller will provide the shared memory. In PyCUDA, that is done by specifying shared=nnnn on the line that calls the CUDA function. In your case, something like: reduce0(drv.In(a),drv.Out(dest),block=(400,1,1),shared=4*400) Alternately, you can drop the extern ...


1

You're launching a 1D kernel, so get_global_id(1) will always return 0. This explains why your kernel simply copies the first element of the dados array into each element of the output. Using a float16 to represent one 'row' of your input only works if you actually have 8 complex numbers per row. In your example you only have 6, which is why you don't quite ...


1

Well, I went around the problem and solved it by casting the value dt and other constants in the kernel, as suggested by Jiminion. This is not the most elegant solution but it works. __kernel void updade_state( __global float8 *q,__global float8 *qm, __global float8 *v){ const int gid = get_global_id(0); float8 qs; float dt, c1, c2, c3; c1 = 6.0; c2 = ...


1

Make sure you have correct permissions on /dev/nvidia*, which can only be accessed as root by default. Alternatively just run with sudo.


1

Sounds like you could use a multiprocessing.Lock to synchronize access to the GPU: data_chunks = chunks(data,num_procs) lock = multiprocessing.Lock() for chunk in data_chunks: if len(chunk) == 0: continue # Instantiates the process p = multiprocessing.Process(target=test, args=(arg1,arg2, lock)) ... Then, inside test where you ...


1

It is not guaranteed for OpenCL 1.x. This is why it is unsafe to store pointers in buffers. The runtime is allowed to move the allocation for each kernel launch. There is no guarantee that it will move it, and of course it is reasonable to expect that the buffer will not often need to move so it isn't surprising that you'd see the result you see. If you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible