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69

Looks like OpenGL is trying to report some error on Win2003, however you've not configured your system where to output logging info. You can add the following to the beginning of your program and you'll see details of the error in stderr. import logging logging.basicConfig() Checkout documentation on logging module to get more config info, conceptually ...


33

Stay away from NeHe, the tutorials are hopelessly outdated and contain a lot of "problematic" stuff, too. For starting with 3.x, try those, they're both up-to-date: Aurian (Joe Groff) Arcsynthesis (Jason L. McKesson) Update: Re-reading my own post almost 2 years later, I guess that one might find that it sounds a bit harsh. This is of course not the ...


33

As an addition to this answer, here is a simple geometry shader which will let you visualize your normals. Modify the accompanying vertex shader as needed based on your attribute locations and how you send your matrices. But first, a picture of a giant bunny head from our friend the Stanford bunny as an example of the result ! Major warning: do note that ...


29

(The intuition behind the "up" vector in gluLookAt is simple: Look at anything. Now tilt your head 90 degrees. Where you are hasn't changed, the direction you're looking at hasn't changed, but the image in your retina clearly has. What's the difference? Where the top of your head is pointing to. That's the up vector.) But to answer your question: gluLookAt ...


25

Hmm... You're interpolating the normal as a varying variable, so the fragment shader should receive the correct per-pixel normal. The only explanation (I can think of) of the fact that you're having the result as on your left image is that every fragment on a given face ultimately receives the same normal. You can confirm it with a fragment shader like: ...


20

As Tony said, this is really going to depend on your goals. If you're "tinkering" to try to learn about OpenGL or 3D rendering in general that I would dispense with all pleasantries and start working with PyOpenGL, which is as close are you're going to get to "raw" 3D programming using Python. On the other hand, if you're "tinkering" by way of mocking up a ...


20

It depends a LOT on the contents of your computer graphics course. If you are doing anything like the introductory course I've taught in the past, it's basically spinning cubes and spheres, some texture mapping and some vertex animation, and that's about it. In this case, Python would be perfectly adequate, assuming you can get around the Unpythonic (and, ...


16

Start with pyglet. It contains the best high-level API, which contains all you need to get started, from opening a window to drawing sprites and OpenGL primitives using their friendly and powerful Sprite and Batch classes. Later, you might also want to write your own lower-level code, that makes calls directly to OpenGL functions such as glDrawArrays, etc. ...


13

Did you forget to install the Python bindings? apt-get install python-qt4-gl


13

You should go on and read a OpenGL tutorial. Here's a pyopengl demo; other samples are over here. Also, you can use pygame together with pyopengl; an example is here.


12

To make this code fast, you need to "vectorise" it: replace all explicit Python loops by implicit loops, using NumPy's boradcasting rules. I can try and give a vectorised version of your loop: if self.color_array is None: self.color_array = numpy.empty((len(activity), 4)) diff_activity = (activity - self.min) / abs_diff self.color_array[:, :3] = ...


12

I was using Python 2.7.3 on Windows 7 64-bit and had a problem causing the same symptoms as Noob. But the above PyOpenGL reinstallation solution did not help me. I try a longshot - installation of freeglut - and it helped! I used Windows MSVC 2.8.0 binary package from here and dropped both 32-bit and 64-bit DLLs to my 32-bit (c:\Windows\SysWOW64) and ...


10

With the caveat that I have done very little OpenGL programming myself, I believe that for the purposes of learning, PyOpenGL is a good choice. The main reason is that PyOpenGL, like most other OpenGL wrappers, is just that: a thin wrapper around the OpenGL API. One large benefit of PyOpenGL is that while in C you have to worry about calling the proper ...


7

I installed PyOpenGL-3.0.2b2 on Python 3.2 using the setup.py install (with administrator privileges), it came out with the same error as the OP. The setup script didn't copy the DLLS folder, so you have to copy it yourself the whole folder \PyOpenGL-3.0.2b2\OpenGL\DLLS. This worked for me, hope it helps anyone else.


6

As frou pointed out, this would be due to Pygame waiting for the vertical retrace when you update the screen by calling display.flip(). As the Pygame display documentation notes, if you set the display mode using the HWSURFACE or the DOUBLEBUF flags, display.flip() will wait for the vertical retrace before swapping buffers. To be honest, I don't see any ...


6

It's a bit hard to say for sure. The first thing is probably to change your hint from GL_DONT_CARE to GL_NICEST. It probably won't make much difference with most graphics cards, but it might help a little. Other than that, it's a bit hard to say. Here's a bit of code (in C++; sorry): void draw_line(float y_offset) { glBegin(GL_LINES); ...


6

I think you were close. Try: pBits = im.convert("RGBA").tostring("raw", "RGBA") The image first has to be converted to RGBA mode in order for the RGBA rawmode packer to be available (see Pack.c in libimaging). You can check that len(pBits) == im.size[0]*im.size[1]*4, which is 200x200x4 = 160,000 bytes for your gloves200 image.


6

First of all : profile your code with cProfile You should use xrange instead of range You should avoid to recall self.color_array 4 times on each loop, try to create a local variable before the loop, and use it into the loop : local_array = self.color_array try to pre-compute the start_colors[N] and end_colors[N] : start_color_0 = start_colors[0] try to use ...


5

Allow Pyglet to use an extra sample buffer might help. Change your window line to this: config = pyglet.gl.Config(sample_buffers=1, samples=4) window = pyglet.window.Window(config=config, resizable=True) This works for me.


5

Python is the way to go. Since all opengl programming is uploading data to the video card RAM, then using opengl to operate on it, the speed limitations in python are moot. Also it makes the hard things in C++ easy ie opening files, images, sounds etc. As for the person above implementing octrees, there is nothing stopping you from using numpy, which is ...


5

The spec is kinda fuzzy on this. It says that you will get GL_INVALID_VALUE if the level parameter is "larger than the maximum allowable level-of-detail". Exactly how this is defined is not stated. The documentation for the function clears it up a bit, saying that it is the maximum possible number of LODs for the largest possible texture ...


5

You can try with something higher level, if you want do to simple games, Panda3D has a reputation of being very simple (compared to straight opengl) to learn.


5

in linux os you should install freeglut3 in ubuntu 12.04 : sudo apt-get install freeglut3


4

It's almost certainly the overhead of all the immediate mode function calls that's killing your performance. I would do the following. Don't use GL_LINE_STRIPS, use a single list of GL_LINES instead so they can be rendered in one go. Use glDrawArrays instead of immediate mode rendering: float* coordinates = {....}; //x and y coordinate pairs for all line ...


4

I don't have a copy of the Superbible, so I don't know their exact proposition, but this approach seems very inefficient, and imprecise : your 5x5 filter is only accessing the 'i'th sample of each texel, and totally misses the other samples. For the filtering phase, I'd go, as kvark already suggested, for a resolve in another texture using glBlitFramebuffer ...


4

Thanks to Jason L. McKesson No deprecated code fantastic examples and tutorials here (in OpenGL 3.3) http://www.arcsynthesis.org/gltut/index.html And another one without too much explanation here (in OpenGL 4.x and 3.3) http://openglbook.com/the-book/


4

I've created a couple of floating point RGBA texture... No, you did not. glTexImage2D(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, 4, width, height, 0, GL_RGBA, GL_FLOAT, data); This statement does not create a floating-point texture. Well, maybe it does if you're using OpenGL ES, but it certainly doesn't in desktop GL. Though I'm pretty sure OpenGL ES doesn't let you use "4" ...


4

You can use OpenGL.arrays.vbo.VBO class for that: from OpenGL.arrays import vbo # data for your buffer buf = vbo.VBO( [ 1,2,3,4,5,...], target = GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER ) # calls glBindBuffer buf.bind() # starts reading at 14-th byte glDrawElements(GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP, count, GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT, buf + 14)


4

It appears one has to download either glut or freeglut along with pyOpenGL. And most importantly, on my 64-bit Win7 system it only worked once I placed the glut32.dll file in C:\Windows\System (NOT C:\Windows\System32 - placing it in \System32 did not work!) Here's a link for glut: http://user.xmission.com/~nate/glut.html And freeglut: ...


4

Same exact problem was happening with me. I am using Python 2.7 on windows xp 32-bits. Solution: Just download glut-3.7.6-bin.zip from http://user.xmission.com/~nate/glut.html, unzip, place glut32.dll in C:\windows\system32 and you should be OK.



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