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37

http://docs.python.org/library/httplib.html: Note: HTTPS support is only available if the socket module was compiled with SSL support. #!/usr/bin/env python import httplib c = httplib.HTTPSConnection("ccc.de") c.request("GET", "/") response = c.getresponse() print response.status, response.reason data = response.read() print data # => # 200 OK # ...


22

pyOpenSSL 0.13 introduced support for the (S)erver (N)ame (I)ndication TLS extension. This extension allows clients to tell the server what hostname they expect to be talking to, allowing the server to select a suitable certificate to present. Support for SNI was introduced in OpenSSL 0.9.8f. Thus, pyOpenSSL 0.13 will build with OpenSSL 0.9.8f or later, ...


13

Apparently pyopenssl installation expects the binaries and libs to be laid out exactly as installed by OpenSSL windows binaries. Installing it from there (and not using cygwin's openssl for example), and adding the bin directory to the path solved this issue.


13

It's fairly straight-forward to use. This isn't tested, but should work: # load everything. Probably not the best idea in production... from OpenSSL.crypto import * # open it, using password. Supply/read your own from stdin. p12 = load_pkcs12(file("/path/to/cert.p12", 'rb').read(), passwd) # get various properties of said file. # note these are PyOpenSSL ...


9

you can just goto http://pypi.python.org/pypi/pyOpenSSL/0.13 and download the windows installer, after that, continue your scrapy install.


8

yum install pyOpenSSL. Should have tried this to begin with


7

using class httplib.HTTPSConnection http://docs.python.org/library/httplib.html#httplib.HTTPSConnection


6

I ran into this while trying to install Scrapy. For me, Thanasis' answer didn't work. After some more Google and randomly installing things yum install python-devel allowed the Scrapy install to run for me (CentOS release 6.3 (Final))


5

Neither pyOpenSSL nor M2Crypto exposes OpenSSL's DTLS features (as far as I know). So, the first step would be to extend one of these libraries to support it. After that, you could extend Twisted to use the new features you just added to the underlying SSL library.


5

You can't do that with pyOpenSSL, but this information from CRLs can actually be extracted using PyCrypto's asn1 parser without much problems. See example below: import types from Crypto.Util import asn1 import datetime as dt from pytz import UTC def decode_time(obj, format): return dt.datetime.strptime(obj.payload, format).replace(tzinfo=UTC) ...


5

try using easy_install easy_install PyOpenSSL easy_install PyCrypto


5

Someone created a patch for apns-client to make it default to TLS, which is Apple's recommended solution going forward. It will certainly be merged soon. Hope this helps.


4

After the handshake is complete, you can get the client certificate. While the client certificate is also available in the verify callback (verify_cb), there's not really any reason to try to do anything aside from verify the certificate in that callback. Setting up an application-specific mapping is better done after the handshake has completely ...


4

To check for ssl support in Python 2.6+: try: import ssl except ImportError: print "error: no ssl support" To connect via https: import urllib2 try: response = urllib2.urlopen('https://example.com') print 'response headers: "%s"' % response.info() except IOError, e: if hasattr(e, 'code'): # HTTPError print 'http error code: ...


4

I'd recommend using a more broad crypto library such as M2Crypto which has the X509 certificate functions as well as RSA encryption: from M2Crypto import RSA, X509 data = ssl_sock.getpeercert(1) # load the certificate into M2Crypto to manipulate it cert = X509.load_cert_string(data, X509.FORMAT_DER) pub_key = cert.get_pubkey() rsa_key = pub_key.get_rsa() ...


4

Sometimes in order to send application bytes of an SSL connection, you need to be able to read more bytes from the connection first. WantReadError is how this case is indicated. The only thing you're doing wrong is that you're not handling the WantReadError and then waiting until select indicates that the socket is readable before you try calling send ...


4

I needed the following two tweaks to the python script to make it work with export cipher suites: PROTOCOL = "sslv23" ... print "[i] Initializing context ..." ctx = M2Crypto.SSL.Context(protocol=PROTOCOL, weak_crypto=True) ctx.load_cert_chain(certchainfile=CERTFILE, keyfile=KEYFILE) ctx.set_options(M2Crypto.m2.SSL_OP_ALL) ...


4

Not exactly what is asked, but in Ubuntu 12.04 it can be installed with: sudo apt-get install python-openssl


4

It means that the CA key you are using doesn't have a subjectKeyIdentifier set. In your example you are creating the authorityKeyIdentifier using a reference to ca which doesn't have subjectKeyIdentifier set yet. If you change your code a to: ca.add_extensions([ OpenSSL.crypto.X509Extension("basicConstraints", True, ...


4

You can load a PEM certificate as follows: import OpenSSL.crypto st_cert=open(certfile, 'rt').read() c=OpenSSL.crypto cert=c.load_certificate(c.FILETYPE_PEM, st_cert) and a private key with: st_cert=open(keyfile, 'rt').read() key=c.load_privatekey(c.FILETYPE_PEM, st_key) where certfile and keyfile are the filenames.


4

I got the same error on Mac OS. I solved it by using openssl 0.13 instead of the latest version. easy_install pyOpenSSL==0.13 or pip install pyOpenSSL==0.13


3

You can get any and all extensions on an X.509 certificate you've loaded using pyOpenSSL. For example: >>> from OpenSSL import crypto as c >>> cert = c.load_certificate(c.FILETYPE_PEM, file('server.pem').read()) >>> cert.get_extension_count() 4L >>> ext = cert.get_extension(0) >>> ext.get_short_name() ...


3

In the OpenSSL documentation for set_verify(), the key that you care about is the return code: callback should take five arguments: A Connection object, an X509 object, and three integer variables, which are in turn potential error number, error depth and return code. callback should return true if verification passes and false otherwise. There ...


3

The SSL context object can be configured with an "info callback" - Context.set_info_callback. This is a wrapper around SSL_CTX_set_info_callback. The slightly more convenient (in this case) SSL_set_info_callback for specifying a callback for a single connection is not exposed by pyOpenSSL, unfortunately. Amongst other things, the info callback is invoked ...


3

This article shows how to do it in openssl, maybe it applies to pyOpenSSL. Also, the article is almost ten years old now, so there may be a simpler way by now.


3

In an SSL transaction, each side can present a certificate to verify its identity to the other side. To do this, it needs to have the private key corresponding to that certificate. These are intended to be two different certificates, so each side will have two different private keys. This certificate/private key pair is the one that you are setting using ...


3

So the answer comes from reading a bit more of the source of pyOpenSSL, with a pointer from exarkun. pyOpenSSL can indeed replace the M2Crypto dependency here, with very minor changes to the underlying code. The unittest for the crypto.verify() function here shows the call taking: verify(good_cert, sig, content, digest) Consequently there was an error ...


3

For me I had to install the openssl-devel libs: yum install openssl-devel Was trying to install the cyclone/tornado/twisted python evented lib.


3

I'm providing code that implements Jean-Paul's answer. class ProxyClientTLSContextFactory(ssl.ClientContextFactory): isClient = 1 def getContext(self): ctx = SSL.Context(SSL.TLSv1_METHOD) logger = logging.GetLogger() def infoCallback(conn, where, ret): # conn is a OpenSSL.SSL.Connection # where is a set of flags telling ...


3

You can indeed go with pyOpenSSL. As you are saying you already have CA root certificate and a private key, and CSR will be sent by a client then you can use functions of crypto to read all those ( CA cert, private key and Device CSR ) from file or manage to have them in buffer. Use below functions to start with. Check dir(crypto) and ...



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