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You are on the right track, see the embedded comments in this update to your parser: from pyparsing import * keywords = ["select", "show", "team", "from", "to", "commits", "and", "or"] [select, show, team, _from, _to, commits, _and, _or] = [ CaselessKeyword(word) for word in keywords ] # define an expression to prevent matching keywords as user names - ...


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You can make the pyparsing parser very lenient in what it matches, and then have a parse action do the more rigorous value checking. This is especially easy if your date strings are all non-whitespace characters. For example, say we wanted to parse for a month name, but for some reason did not want our parser expression to just do `oneOf('January February ...


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A simple approach is to require the date be quoted. A rough example is something like this, but you'll need to adjust to fit in with your current grammar if needs be: from pyparsing import CaselessKeyword, quotedString, removeQuotes from dateutil.parser import parse as parse_date dp = ( CaselessKeyword('from') + ...


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I suggest using something like sqlparse that already handles all the weird edge cases for you. It might be a better option in the long term, if you have to deal with more advanced cases. EDIT: Why not just parse the date blocks as strings? Like so: from pyparsing import CaselessKeyword, Word, Combine, Optional, alphas, nums class QueryParser(object): ...


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The problem happens when using alternation (the | operator) with CaselessKeyword. See these examples: from pyparsing import * theString = 'This is @Foo Bar' identifier = Combine(Word(alphas + '_', alphanums + '_') + Optional('.' + Word(alphas))) def testParser(p): q = StringStart() + SkipTo(p)("previous") + p("body") + SkipTo(StringEnd())("rest") ...


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You'll get a little better exception message if you give names to your expressions, using setName. From the "Expected W:(0123...)" part of the exception message, it looks like the parser is not finding a numeric value where it is expected. But the default name is not showing us enough to know which type of numeric field is expected. Modify your parser to add ...


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You should check the documentation for the library that you are using. In general it would be extremely helpful to include the library and more of the source code and source data when asking this question. You appear to be using the pyparsing library from Anaconda Continuum. You can find the documentation here. You can find the API reference for what ...


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Pyparsing lets you simplify some of these kinds of constructs leaves :: {leaf} leaf to just OneOrMore(leaf) So one form of your BNF in pyparsing will look something like: from pyparsing import * LBRACE,RBRACE,EQ,SEMI = map(Suppress, "{}=;") name = Word(printables, excludeChars="{}=;") expr = Word(printables, excludeChars="{}=;") | quotedString leaf ...


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I'd suggest pathos.multiprocessing, as you mention. Of course, I'm the pathos author, so I guess that's not a surprise. It appears that there might be a distutils bug that you are running into, as referenced here: https://github.com/uqfoundation/pathos/issues/49. Your solution using dill is a good workaround. You also might be able to forgo installing ...


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OK, here is the solution inspired by rocksportrocker: Python multiprocessing pickling error The idea is to dill the object that can't be pickled while passing it back and forth between processes and then "undill" it after it has been passed: from multiprocessing import Pool import dill def submit_decoder_process(decoder_dill, input_line): decoder = ...


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https://docs.python.org/2/library/pickle.html#what-can-be-pickled-and-unpickled The multiprocessing.Pool uses the Pickle's protocol to serialize the function and module names (in your example setParseAction and pyparse) which are delivered through the Pipe to the child process. The child process, once receives them, it imports the module and try to call ...


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Try to use: reobj = re.compile(r'<a\b[^>]href=".*?location=cons_tab.*?"[^>]*>(.*?)</a>', re.IGNORECASE | re.DOTALL) match = reobj.search(text) if match: result = match.group(1) else: result = ""


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Using BeautifulSoup: >>> from bs4 import BeautifulSoup >>> soup = BeautifulSoup('your_html') >>> for x in soup.find_all('a'): ... if x.get('href').endswith('location=cons_tab'): ... print x.text ... the value i want Using regex: >>> import re >>> ...



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