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3

AFAIR, QInputDialog.getText does not support on-the-fly validation, but if you are willing to roll your own dialog, you could use QRegExpValidator 1.Look up the needed regex on the Internets (here, for instance). See that it looks like ^(([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5]).){3}([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])$ for IP4 Create ...


3

With Qt5, you can set the applicationDisplayName, which is separate from the main title-bar text. To show the modification state in the title-bar, you would do this: QtWidget.qApp.setApplicationDisplayName('Test') ... window.setWindowFilePath('/path/to/file.txt') window.setWindowModified(True) and the title-bar would look like this: ...


3

From the official documentation: PySide.QtGui.QLayout.setContentsMargins() sets the width of the outer border on each side of the widget. This is the width of the reserved space along each of the PySide.QtGui.QBoxLayout ‘s four sides. PySide.QtGui.QBoxLayout.setSpacing() sets the width between neighboring boxes. (You can use ...


3

Qt stylesheets are very mighty for styling and I recommend them. With self.setStyleSheet('QTableView::item{background:black;} QTableView{gridline-color:black;}') instead of setPalette in your example you achieve black items and black grid lines of the table. You can do much more with style sheets, for example change the background of the item when ...


2

just set self.pb.setTextVisible(False)


2

Direct citation from the helpfile (Using PySide): Normally one creates a PySide application object in a script using QtGui.QApplication(). However, in 3ds Max, there is already a PySide application running, so you get a handle for that object like this: QtGui.QApplication.instance()


2

You can use dynamic properties to do this: from PySide import QtCore, QtGui class Window(QtGui.QWidget): def __init__(self): QtGui.QWidget.__init__(self) self.edit = QtGui.QLineEdit(self) self.edit.setProperty('warning', False) self.edit.setStyleSheet(""" /* other rules go here */ ...


2

It's not a good idea to change the UI file as it will be regenerated every time you update the UI in Qt Creator and any changes will be lost. Instead, make another UI class that calls the auto generated file for you (and there are other designs for defining the UI class, as ekhumoro pointed out): class Prog(QtGui.QMainWindow): def __init__(self): ...


2

The hasIndex function just performs bounds-checking. If the row or column arguments are less than zero, or outside of the range of the row or column count of the parent index, it will return False; otherwise, it will return True. Also, in the example implementation, the index method does not return the root-index when hasIndex returns false: it returns an ...


2

Turns out the CustomizeWindowHint flag needs to be set before the WindowCloseButtonHint flag can be changed. The full code is: # enable custom window hint self.setWindowFlags(self.windowFlags() | QtCore.Qt.CustomizeWindowHint) # disable (but not hide) close button self.setWindowFlags(self.windowFlags() & ~QtCore.Qt.WindowCloseButtonHint)


2

Qt::SizeHintRole responsible for width and height of cell. So you can just: someModel.setData(someIndex,QSize(width, height), Qt::SizeHintRole); Or just this: someView.verticalHeader().setDefaultSectionSize(10); And I think that setDefaultSectionSize is exactly what are you looking for. AFAIK there is no another simple way. From doc: ...


2

First off, you could use a list to keep all those widgets instead of those "manually" named variables: self.kicks = [QtGui.QCheckBox(self) for _ in xrange(16)] Second, you should take a serious look at layout managers. I haven't yet come across the need to use absolute positioning. E.g. an QHBoxLayout will arrange all added widgets adjacent in a ...


2

Connect the signal using a lambda so that the relevant process is passed to the slot: p.readyReadStandardOutput.connect( lambda process=p: self.write_process_output(process)) def write_process_output(self, process): self.viewer.text_edit.append(process.readAllStandardOutput())


1

Solution In theory, a nice feature of the Model-View framework is that you can have multiple views of the same Model. In practice, though, QAbstractTableModel is really meant to help you view tables, not trees. The documentation for QAbstractTableModel says: Since the model provides a more specialized interface than QAbstractItemModel, it is not ...


1

Since you want the user enter time date, I would suggest to reuse the already existing QDateTimeEdit class in the following way: dateTime = QDateTimeEdit(); dateTime.setDisplayFormat("hh:mm"); dateTime.setFrame(False); myTableWidget.setCellWidget(row, column, dateTime); The user will be able to edit the "time data" this way in your table widget. Moreover, ...


1

Your algorithm is fine, but it can only be as accurate as the width of a standard space in the proportional font you are using. To get more accurate results, use the thinnest possible whitespace character available. For fonts with good unicode support, this will be the HAIR SPACE U+200A. On Linux (using the DejaVu Sans font) I can exactly reproduce (3) by ...


1

Not sure why this fixed it. But here is how: class MyThread(QtCore.QThread): def __init__(self): super(MyThread, self).__init__() def run(self): import win32com.client import pythoncom pythoncom.CoInitialize() ProgID = "Foobar2000.Application.0.7" foobar_COM_object = win32com.client.Dispatch(ProgID) ...


1

First of all - you are initializing your script wrong, you call the 'initialize' function which returns #Success (meaning python initialized properly), however you then just send in a string (which is the path to the file) and this does nothing. What you have to use is: python.ExecuteFile "C:\\Program Files\\Autodesk\\3ds Max ...


1

Not pretty, but off the top of my head: You'll need to cycle through all of your widgets and use their coordinates against the mouse coordinates. EDIT: If you want O(1), you can do this but it will require more overhead, and you'll need to store the coordinates after each move. I actually have a class that does this, as I want movable (by user) widgets ...


1

This can be done via recent versions of xclip which support the -t text/html (target selection) and pandoc to convert html to markdown. See the details: Save HTML from clipboard as markdown text - Unix & Linux Stack Exchange Thanks to @mountainx for asking again on the Unix stackexchange, which provided this solution, as noted in a comment above.


1

You said you used lambdas, did you try this self.ui.button1.clicked.connect(lambda:test(True)) self.ui.button2.clicked.connect(lambda:test(False)) This should work.


1

The timer posts a QTimerEvent, but there is no event-loop running in the thread to process it. So you need to do something like this: def run(self): timer1 = QTimer() timer1.singleShot(1000, self.alarm_goes1) print "Timer 1 Start" timer1.start() # start the clock clock = QTimer() clock.start(1000) ...


1

You need to keep a reference to the delegate: self.delegate = QtGui.QStyledItemDelegate() treeview.setItemDelegateForColumn(0, self.delegate) or give it a parent: treeview.setItemDelegateForColumn(0, QtGui.QStyledItemDelegate(treeview))


1

The Script object created in the FileChanged function has local scope, and will be garbage-collected as soon as the function returns. If the Run slot gets called when the signal fires, it will carry out all of the changes correctly, but you won't get to see any of those changes, because Script will be deleted before it is ever shown. In order to for the ...


1

Unfortunately Pyside is not supported by PyPy [1][2] at this stage so you wouldn't be able to use it from PyPy. A version of Pyside patched for PyPy was in development [3] but it is now stalled and known not to work. Let's hope this changes in the near future. I between, you can try wxWidgets [4], Tkinter [5] and even GTK through pgi [6]. References: ...


1

From the official documentation: When implementing a table based model, rowCount() should return 0 when the parent is valid. The same goes for columnCount(). And for completeness, data() should return None if the parent is valid. What happened is this: You click on the '+' sign next to "Stinkberries". The QTreeView thinks, "I need to expand the ...


1

You're trying to call statusBar() on your QApplication, which does not possess such method. You need to create a QMainWindows as your main widget, and call statusBar on it. Have a look at the PySide documentation of QMainWindow. You'll find an example of how to use the status bar.


1

You can try something like this: from PySide import QtGui, QtCore import sys class MainWindow(QtGui.QWidget): def __init__(self): super().__init__() layout = QtGui.QHBoxLayout() self.setLayout(layout) label = QtGui.QLabel('5') label.setAutoFillBackground(True) p = label.palette() ...


1

In general, a mask is a value used to include or exclude certain bits of another value, using bitwise operations. The definition of the DropAction enum, includes another flag: Qt::TargetMoveAction 0x8002 which is outside of the range of the mask. So the mask could be used to screen out such values, like this: >>> from PySide.QtCore ...


1

Hacky way, but you could do this by casting self.header() into a QWidget, since setCursor() is a method of QWidget class. import sys from PySide import QtCore, QtGui class Tree(QtGui.QTreeWidget): def __init__(self, parent=None): super(Tree, self).__init__(parent=parent) QtGui.QWidget(self.header()).setCursor(QtCore.Qt.WaitCursor) ...



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