Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

QGridLayout::addLayout has a fourth (optional) parameter alignment. The alignment is specified by alignment. The default alignment is 0, which means that the widget fills the entire cell. So instead of setting the alignment of the QVBoxLayouts, set it when adding the layouts. def create_layout(self): .... ...


1

I only have PyQt5 available for testing, but was able to reproduce your problem with it. When defining the layout in create_layout, buttonGroup1 and buttonGroup2 are deleted on return. You need to store these variables for them to exist after method return. For example this can be done by adding the following to the end of create_layout: def ...


0

I've taken the effort of crafting a small generic 2-way binding framework for a pyqt project that I'm working on. Here it is: https://gist.github.com/jkokorian/31bd6ea3c535b1280334#file-pyqt2waybinding Here is an example of how it's used (also included in the gist): The model (non-gui) class class Model(q.QObject): """ A simple model class for ...


0

I have done something like this Video The problem now is, i want to clear these extra selections on cursor position or selection change but i don't get it how to do it. Here is the code i edited: def find(self): input = QInputDialog.getText(self.mdiWidget.currentWidget(), unicode("Find"), unicode('Unesite Tekst:')) txt = ...


0

OR Override Qt::ItemFlags MyTableView::flags(const QModelIndex& index) const { Qt::ItemFlags flags = QAbstractTableModel::flags(index); flags |= Qt::ItemIsEditable; return flags; }


2

You should always use QFontInfo to get accurate information about a font. A QFont will only show what was requested, rather than what the system was actually able to provide: >>> font = QtGui.QFont('Arial') >>> font.family() 'Arial' >>> fontinfo = QtGui.QFontInfo(font) >>> fontinfo.family() 'Helvetica' I don't have ...


2

According to the docs, the variant of QWidget.render that has a QPainter as its first parameter expects a mandatory targetOffset of type QPoint as its second parameter. If I add an empty point it works for me (although the tree widget is printed very small). painter.begin(printer) try: self.view.render(painter, QtCore.QPoint()) finally: ...


1

As per ekhumoro's comments above, I've managed to solve this question using both the qInstallMsgHandler and sys.excepthook functions. import sys import os from PySide.QtCore import qInstallMsgHandler def myCustomHandler(ErrorType, ErrorContext): print("Qt error found.") print("Error Type: " + str(ErrorType)) print("Error Context: " + ...


1

You need to remove the redundant tp_widget and add view to tgb_layout: def make_tree(self): # init widgets self.tgb = QGroupBox("[Tree Group Box Title]") self.main_layout.addWidget(self.tgb) tgb_layout = QVBoxLayout() self.tgb.setLayout(tgb_layout) view = QTreeView() tgb_layout.addWidget(view) ... debug_btn = ...


1

You must use the setLayout method to link the layout to the widget. So change... self.main_layout = QVBoxLayout(self.main_widget) into self.main_layout = QVBoxLayout() self.main_widget.setLayout(self.main_layout) Similar for the tgb_view layout (which I would rename to tgb_layout for clarity). Finally you forgot to add the tree view to this layout, ...


2

As @ekhumoro said in the comments, QTimer helped a lot. I needed an event-loop. I'm posting the code to make the answer valid. I rewrote it using QTimer, which made everything simpler really. Note that I need to call QCoreApplication to run the threads. Again, this is just the minimal code to reproduce what I needed to do. import time from PySide import ...


2

As described in the Model/View Programming Guide you can put the top-left and bottom-right indices in a QItemSelection and so select all cells at once. Note that for hierarchical models you will have to make the selection at all levels of the tree recursively (see the selecting all notes section). Something like this: def mySelectRows(treeView, ...


0

I came up with a solution also. def fileHandle(self): string = str(self.filename.text()) file = QFile() file.setFileName(string) file.open(QIODevice.ReadOnly) print(file.exists()) line = file.readLine() print(line) What this does is that it takes the string of the filename field. Creates the file ...


0

The Python open() function doesn't have any knowledge of objects of type QFile. I doubt you actually need to construct a QFile object though. Instead, just open the file directly via open(self.fileName.text(), 'r'). Preferably, you would do: with open(self.fileName.text(), 'r') as myfile: # do stuff with the file unless you need to keep the file ...


0

To use python 3, just follow the instructions here: https://wiki.qt.io/PySide_Binaries_Linux which in ubuntu 12.04 means just typing one line in the console: sudo apt-get install python3-pyside


0

Well after some more digging and trying, adjusting the text rectangle seems to give the feel that everything is allright and seems to behave consistently in various DEs textRect.adjust(-1, -4, 0, 0) I am not sure if its a bug, but one would expect that SE_ItemViewItemText should have give the correct position on its own


0

You could use a statemachine. state no Printer state Printer detected state Printer active With your QTimer you regularely check if lsusb finds the printer. If found, you change to detected, open the popup and change to state active. In state active you regularely check if the Printer still can be found. If not you change back into state no Printer.


0

Maybe you are behind a proxy. I've experienced the same behavior and setting a Proxy for the Application helped. from PySide.QtNetwork import QNetworkProxy proxy = QNetworkProxy() proxy.setType(QNetworkProxy.Socks5Proxy); proxy.setType(QNetworkProxy.HttpProxy); proxy.setHostName("*********"); proxy.setPort(****); QNetworkProxy.setApplicationProxy(proxy);


1

So the main solution to getting sphinx to fly without needing the extra extensions is to mock them like this: class Mock(MagicMock): @classmethod def __getattr__(cls, name): return Mock() MOCKS = ['bar'] sys.modules.update((mod_name, Mock()) for mod_name in MOCKS) an example here and the sphinx autodoc module uses a similar approach. ...


0

This might be an old thread, but I had a similar problem and show() made the dialog appear, but empty. So, I came up with this decorator that I apply to functions that I want to run blocking, while permitting GUI thread to process events. def nongui(fun): """Decorator running the function in non-gui thread while processing the gui events.""" ...


0

I had the same problem in C++. From a QApplication, I spawn a Service object. The object creates the Gui Widget but it's not its parent (the parent is QApplication then). To control the GuiWidget from the service widget, I just use signals and slots as usual and it works as expected. Note: The thread of GuiWidget and the one of the service are different. ...


1

I've found a workaround that works for me. When using a QToolButton instead of a QPushbutton the button has the same height as the line editor.


3

This is an example Qt application demonstrating sending signals from a child process to slots in the mother process. I'm not sure this is right approach but it works. I differentiate between process as mother and child, because the word parent is alread used in the Qt context. The mother process has two threads. Main thread of mother process sends data to ...


1

I fixed my problem by installing Python 3.4.3. So I assume this must be compatibility between PyQt/PySide and Python distributions (Anaconda).


1

Looks to me like it's a problem of using super with multiple inheritance. It picks one of the parents in a certain order to use. For example, super(Error_Popup,self).__init__(parent) only calls one of the parents __init__ methods. You have to manually call all of them. When calling methods or accessing variables, you have to be specific about which ...


0

Can you just provide a blank string for anything less than 0? def tickStrings(self, values, scale, spacing): return ['' if value < 0 else QTime().addMSecs(value).toString('mm:ss') for value in values]


0

A quite interesting topic. I guess having a signal that works between threads is a very useful thing. How about creating a custom signal based on sockets? I haven't tested this yet, but this is what I gathered up with some quick investigation: class CrossThreadSignal(QObject): signal = pyqtSignal(object) def __init__(self, parent=None): ...


0

If your application only needs one instance of MainWindow, then you could achieve what you want by making it a singleton class: class MainWindow(QMainWindow): _instance = None _initialized = False def __new__(cls): if cls._instance is None: cls._instance = super(MainWindow, cls).__new__(cls) return cls._instance ...


0

In one project i had to enable one module to do a callback to my Mainwindow module. The Controller of the Mainwindow view starts a new subprocess and retrieves the stdout out as well as the callback as soon as the program is terminated. I managed this in the following way: (Maybe it helps with your problem, which i not totally understand) MainWindow Module: ...


2

One should first look how Signals/Slots work within only one Python process: If there is only one running QThread, they just call the slots directly. If the signal is emitted on a different thread it has to find the target thread of the signal and put a message/ post an event in the thread queue of this thread. This thread will then, in due time, process ...


0

Try changing this line descText = str(descEdit) for this: descText = str(descEdit.text())



Top 50 recent answers are included