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29

HDF5 Advantages: Organization, flexibility, interoperability Some of the main advantages of HDF5 are its hierarchical structure (similar to folders/files), optional arbitrary metadata stored with each item, and its flexibility (e.g. compression). This organizational structure and metadata storage may sound trivial, but it's very useful in practice. ...


27

There may be a simpler way, but this is how you'd go about doing it, as far as I know: import numpy as np import tables # Generate some data x = np.random.random((100,100,100)) # Store "x" in a chunked array... f = tables.openFile('test.hdf', 'w') atom = tables.Atom.from_dtype(x.dtype) ds = f.createCArray(f.root, 'somename', atom, x.shape) ds[:] = x ...


21

np.dot dispatches to BLAS when NumPy has been compiled to use BLAS, a BLAS implementation is available at run-time, your data has one of the dtypes float32, float64, complex32 or complex64, and the data is suitably aligned in memory. Otherwise, it defaults to using its own, slow, matrix multiplication routine. Checking your BLAS linkage is described ...


15

The answer by DaveP is almost right... but can cause problems for very sparse matrices: if the last column(s) or row(s) are empty, they are dropped. So to be sure that everything works, the "shape" attribute must be stored too. This is the code I regularly use: import tables as tb from numpy import array from scipy import sparse def store_sparse_mat(m, ...


14

A CSR matrix can be fully reconstructed from its data, indices and indptr attributes. These are just regular numpy arrays, so there should be no problem storing them as 3 separate arrays in pytables, then passing them back to the constructor of csr_matrix. See the scipy docs. Edit: Pietro's answer has pointed out that the shape member should also be stored


13

This is an epic question, and there are lots of considerations. Since you didn't mention any specific performance or architectural constraints, I'll try and offer the best well-rounded suggestions. The initial plan of using PyTables as an intermediary layer between your other elements and the datafiles seems solid. However, one design constraint that ...


13

Piggybacking off of @b1r3k's response, to create an array that you are not going to access all at once (i.e. bring the whole thing into memory), you want to use a CArray (Chunked Array). The idea is that you would then fill and access it incrementally: import numpy as np import tables as tb ndim = 60000 h5file = tb.openFile('test.h5', mode='w', title="Test ...


13

Upgrading Cython from the upstream Git repo will resolve the problem. pip install --upgrade git+git://github.com/cython/cython@master


12

Copy of my answer from the issue: https://github.com/pydata/pandas/issues/3651 Your sample is really too small. HDF5 has a fair amount of overhead with really small sizes (even 300k entries is on the smaller side). The following is with no compression on either side. Floats are really more efficiently represented in binary (that as a text representation). ...


12

Heres a complete example. import numpy as np import pandas as pd import os fname = 'groupby.h5' # create a frame df = pd.DataFrame({'A': ['foo', 'foo', 'foo', 'foo', 'bar', 'bar', 'bar', 'bar', 'foo', 'foo', 'foo'], 'B': ['one', 'one', 'one', 'two', 'one', 'one', ...


11

PyTables files are HDF5 files. However, as I understand it, PyTables adds some extra metadata to the attributes of each entry in the HDF file. If you're looking for a more "vanilla" hdf5 solution for python/numpy, have a look a h5py. It's less database-like (i.e. less "table-like") than PyTables, and doesn't have as many nifty querying features, but it's ...


11

this is a little pseudo codish, but I think should be quite fast. straightfoward disk based merge, with all tables on disk. The key is that you are not doing selection per se, just indexing into the table via start/stop, which is quite fast. Selecting the rows that meet a criteria in B (using A's ids) won't be very fast because I think it might be bringing ...


11

As soon as the statement is exectued, eg store['df'] = df. The close just closes the actual file (which will be closed for you if the process exists, but will print a warning message) Read the section http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/dev/io.html#storing-in-table-format It is generally not a good idea to put a LOT of nodes in an .h5 file. You probably ...


10

If I understand well, the next should do what you want: condition = 'Symbol == "abcd"' indices = table.getWhereList(condition) # get indices rows_array = table[indices] # get values new_rows = compute(rows_array) # compute new values table[indices] = new_rows # update the indices with new values Hope this helps


10

Use append=True in the call to to_hdf: import numpy as np import pandas as pd filename = '/tmp/test.h5' df = pd.DataFrame(np.arange(10).reshape((5,2)), columns=['A', 'B']) print(df) # A B # 0 0 1 # 1 2 3 # 2 4 5 # 3 6 7 # 4 8 9 # Save to HDF5 df.to_hdf(filename, 'data', mode='w', format='table') del df # allow df to be garbage collected ...


9

The proper way to read hdf5 files from C is to use the hdf5 API - see this tutorial. In principal it is possible to directly read the raw data from the hdf5 file as you would with the .npy file, assuming you have not used advanced storage options such as compression in your hdf5 file. However this essentially defies the whole point of using the hdf5 format ...


8

Yes, you can define an order in tables in several different ways. The easiest one is to use the pos parameter for each column. See the docs for the Col class: http://pytables.github.io/usersguide/libref/declarative_classes.html#the-col-class-and-its-descendants For your example, it will look like: class parmDev(tables.IsDescription): time = ...


8

see docs here for the odo project (formerly into). Note if you use the into library, then the argument order has been switched (that was the motivation for changing the name, to avoid confusion!) You can basically do: from odo import odo odo('hdfstore://path_store_1::table_name', 'hdfstore://path_store_new_name::table_name') doing multiple operations ...


7

Back in 2003, a scientific paper on the comparison of PyTables and Sqlite was written by F. Altec, the author of PyTables. This shows that PyTables is usually faster, but not always. On your point that PyTables feels 'bare bones', I would say the H5py is the bare bones way of accessing HDF5 in python, PyTables brings in all kinds of extra stuff like ...


7

This is a very common point of confusion when iterating over Table object, When you iterate over a Table the type of item you get is not the data at the item, but an accessor to the table at the current row. So with [x for x in coords if x['agent'] == 1] you create a list of row accessors that all point to the "current" row of the table, the last row. ...


7

You could try to use tables.CArray class as it supports compression but... I think questions is more about numpy than pytables because you are creating array using numpy before storing it with pytables. In that way you need a lot of ram to execute np.zeros((ndim,ndim) - and this is probably the place where exception: "ValueError: array is too big." is ...


7

What are the basic advantages of PyTables over database(s) when it comes to huge datasets? Effectively, it is a database. Of course it's a hierarchical database rather than a 1-level key-value database like dbm (which are obviously much less flexible) or a relational database like sqlite3 (which are more powerful, but more complicated). But the main ...


7

I have a similar task: to dump fixed size data with arrays of a variable length. I first tried using fixed size StringCol(64*1024) fields to store my variable length data (they are always < 64K). But it was rather slow and wasted a lot of disk space, despite blosc compression. After days of investigation I ended with the following solution: (spoiler: ...


7

I have tested several of the options Jeff mentions in our chatty discussions above. Please have a look at this notebook, hopefully it will help you to make relevant decisions for your data storage: http://nbviewer.ipython.org/810bd0720bb1732067ff The gist for the notebook is here: https://gist.github.com/michaelaye/810bd0720bb1732067ff My main conclusions: ...


7

Here is a similar comparison I just did. Its about 1/3 of the data 10M rows. The final size is abou 1.3GB I define 3 timing functions: Test the Fixed format (called Storer in 0.12). This writes in a PyTables Array format def f(df): store = pd.HDFStore('test.h5','w') store['df'] = df store.close() Write in the Table format, using PyTables ...


6

In the test I've made, you can achieve over twice faster results using the iterrows method instead of where: In [117]: timeit max(row['timestamp'] for row in table.iterrows(stop=1000000)) 1 loops, best of 3: 1 s per loop In [118]: timeit max(row['timestamp'] for row in table.where('(timestamp<=Tf)')) 1 loops, best of 3: 2.21 s per loop In [120]: timeit ...


6

Maybe something like this would work? In [11]: import numpy as np In [12]: import numexpr as ne In [13]: In [13]: x = np.linspace(0.02, 5.0, 1e7) In [14]: y = np.sin(x) In [15]: In [15]: timeit z0 = ((x-y) - ((x-y) > 1) * (x-y - 1))/(x+y) 1 loops, best of 3: 1.02 s per loop In [16]: timeit z1 = ne.evaluate("((x-y) - ((x-y) > 1.) * ((x-y) ...


6

For pure python modules, just add the directory containing the modules to your sys.path, using something like: sys.path.insert(0, '/usr/local/lib') sys.path.insert(0, os.path.expanduser('~/lib')) This works for CPython, Pypy and Jython. For C extension modules, you can try Pypy's cpyext, but it won't run everything you might hope for, because some ...


6

I am not familiar with the inner-workings of Pytables (so this may not be in-line with what you are looking for), but the groupby function in the itertools module is very useful in these types of situations (note the sorting step below - this is important in this case in order to get groupby to group all items with the same date. See here for more info.): ...


6

It's a difficult question and I am not sure if I can give a definite answer but I have experience with both HDF5/pyTables and some NoSQL databases. Here are some thoughts. HDF5 per se has no notion of index. It's only a hierarchical storage format that is well suited for multidimensional numeric data. It's possible to extend on top of HDF5 to implement an ...



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