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68

The best way is this: a = get_list() return a[0] if a else None You could also do it in one line, but it's much harder for the programmer to read: return (get_list()[:1] or [None])[0]


48

I'd recommend saying line.split(";")[0] which will give you a string of all characters up to but not including the first ";" character. If no ";" character is present, then it will give you the entire line.


36

timestamp.sort(key=lambda x: time.strptime(x, '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S')[0:6], reverse=True)


35

You have to use namelist() and extract(). Sample considering directories import zipfile import os.path import os zfile = zipfile.ZipFile("test.zip") for name in zfile.namelist(): (dirname, filename) = os.path.split(name) print "Decompressing " + filename + " on " + dirname if not os.path.exists(dirname): os.makedirs(dirname) zfile.extract(name, ...


33

This will give you a sorted version of the array. sorted(timestamp, reverse=True) If you want to sort in-place: timestamp.sort(reverse=True)


20

def get_first(iterable, default=None): if iterable: for item in iterable: return item return default Example: x = get_first(get_first_list()) if x: ... y = get_first(get_second_list()) if y: ... Another option is to inline the above function: for x in get_first_list() or []: # process x break # process at ...


18

The json module in Python 2.6 is mostly the same as the simplejson third-party module, which is available for Python 2.4 as well. You can just do: try: import json except ImportError: import simplejson as json


18

Now, a few years later, simplejson does only support python 2.5+. No more simplejson for systems stuck on 2.4. Even though it is not supported, you may find older packages on pypi. 2.0.9 or 2.1.0 should work. pip install simplejson==2.1.0 (I could not comment on the chosen answer, but this just bit me hard, so it may be useful to others as well)


14

(get_list() or [None])[0] That should work. BTW I didn't use the variable list, because that overwrites the builtin list() function. Edit: I had a slightly simpler, but wrong version here earlier.


12

There's some problem with Vinko's answer (at least when I run it). I got: IOError: [Errno 13] Permission denied: '01org-webapps-countingbeads-422c4e1/' Here's how to solve it: # unzip a file def unzip(path): zfile = zipfile.ZipFile(path) for name in zfile.namelist(): (dirname, filename) = os.path.split(name) if filename == '': ...


11

I assume your existing code runs in 2.6 or something newer, and you're trying to go back to 2.4? parse_qs used to be in the cgi module before it was moved to urlparse. Try import cgi, cgi.parse_qs. Inspired by TryPyPy's comment, I think you could make your source run in either environment by doing: import urlparse # if we're pre-2.6, this will not ...


11

import operator min(apple.values(), key=operator.itemgetter('size')) will return you {'color': 'green', 'size': 10} UPDATE: to get the index: min(apple, key=lambda k: apple[k]['size'])


10

Yes you can. With Python 2.4, there was SHA-1 module which does exactly this. See the documentation. However, bear in mind that code importing from this module will cause DeprecationWarnings when run with newer Python. Ok, as the requirement was tightened to be SHA-256, using the SHA-1 module in standard library isn't a enough. I'd suggest checking out ...


9

If you can migrate to Python 2.5, there is the defaultdict class, as shown here. You can pass it an initializer that returns what you want. Otherwise, you'll have to roll your own implementation of it, I fear.


9

According to the Python documentation, the right way to handle this in Python versions earlier than 2.5 is: try: foo() except (KeyboardInterrupt, SystemExit): raise except: bar() That's very wordy, but at least it's a solution.


9

You are looking for the built-in reversed(): >>> for i in reversed(range(5)): ... print i ... 4 3 2 1 0 This iterates over the sequence in reverse, without creating an additional copy of your list.


8

just do a split on the line by comment then get the first element eg line.split(";")[0]


8

The OP's solution is nearly there, there are just a few things to make it more Pythonic. For one, there's no need to get the length of the list. Empty lists in Python evaluate to False in an if check. Just simply say if list: Additionally, it's a very Bad Idea to assign to variables that overlap with reserved words. "list" is a reserved word in Python. ...


7

You can use the sha module, if you want to stay compatible, you can import it like this: try: from hashlib import sha1 except ImportError: from sha import sha as sha1


7

Guys thanks i've found the solution and this is the solution =) def mail(receiver,Message): import smtplib try: s=smtplib.SMTP() s.connect("smtp.gmail.com",465) s.ehlo() s.starttls() s.ehlo() s.login("email@gmail.com", "password") s.sendmail("email@gmail.com", receiver, Message) except ...


7

In short: No, there is no way to ensure it gets called. The answer is to implement context managers yourself. A with statement roughly translates to: x.__enter__() try: ... finally: x.__exit__() So just do it manually. It is a little more complex than that, so I recommend reading PEP 343 to fully understand how context managers work. One option ...


7

The urllib2.HTTPBasicAuthHandler class is an old-style class (it doesn't inherit from object), which means it can't be used with super. You have to call its __init__ directly instead: urllib2.HTTPBasicAuthHandler.__init__(self, self.pwdmgr)


6

With old stype formatting: print r'$%s \times 10^{%s}$' % tuple('3.5e+20'.split('e+')) with new format: print r'${} \times 10^{{{}}}$'.format(*'3.5e+20'.split('e+'))


6

Same reason here: >>> li=[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9] >>> it=iter(li) >>> print [x for x in it], [x for x in it] [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9], [] Note the empty list... csv.reader is an iterator that produces items from a container or sequence one by one until the StopIteration exception indicates there are no more items. For built-in ...


6

I'm not certain what tools Python 2.4 has access to, but I'm pretty sure you still have list comprehensions, so you could tuple your list together with the key you want to use, compare, and then unpack. This works because tuples compare element-wise, so if you put the "key" at the front of your tuples, it'll act as the primary comparator. # Note: untested ...


6

In Python 2.4.x, sorted does take a key; you can apply this to your glob and take the last item, for example: newest = sorted(glob.glob(bDir + '*.[Dd][Mm][Pp]'), key=os.path.getctime)[-1]


6

You've got too many _ in the name of __init__. The declaration of your constructor should be: def __init__(self, title, number): not: def __init___(self, title, number):


6

The answer to your first question is: yes, round was fixed in Python 2.7. The answer to your second question is: I'm not sure, short of actually using an earlier Python (2.6 should still exhibit 2.4's behavior). In this particular case, your value is indistinguishable from 1480.395, and 1480.395 (to us base-10 humans) rounds to 1480.40. So I suppose you ...


6

This code works: def test(): """ >>> config = '''<?xml version="1.0"?> ... <test> ... <data>d1</data> ... <data>d2</data> ... </test>''' >>> print config <?xml version="1.0"?> <test> <data>d1</data> <data>d2</data> ...


6

Equivalent code from http://docs.python.org/library/itertools.html#itertools.product def product(*args, **kwds): # product('ABCD', 'xy') --> Ax Ay Bx By Cx Cy Dx Dy # product(range(2), repeat=3) --> 000 001 010 011 100 101 110 111 pools = map(tuple, args) * kwds.get('repeat', 1) result = [[]] for pool in pools: result = ...



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