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1494

Yes, it was added in version 2.5. The syntax is: a if test else b First test is evaluated, then either a or b is returned based on the Boolean value of test; if test evaluates to True a is returned, else b is returned. For example: >>> 'true' if True else 'false' 'true' >>> 'true' if False else 'false' 'false' Keep in mind that it's ...


198

And in python 2.6: import itertools itertools.permutations([1,2,3]) (returned as a generator. Use list(permutations(l)) to return as a list.)


175

You can index into a tuple: (falseValue, trueValue)[test] test needs to return True or False. It might be safer to always implement it as: (falseValue, trueValue)[test == True] or you can use the built-in bool() to assure a Boolean value: (falseValue, trueValue)[bool(<expression>)]


142

Apart from the question whether class decorators are the right solution to your problem: in Python 2.6 and higher, there are class decorators with the @-syntax, so you can write: @addID class Foo: pass in older versions, you can do it another way: class Foo: pass Foo = addID(Foo) Note however that this works the same as for function ...


121

The following code with Python 2.6 and above ONLY First, import itertools: import itertools Permutation (order matters): print list(itertools.permutations([1,2,3,4], 2)) [(1, 2), (1, 3), (1, 4), (2, 1), (2, 3), (2, 4), (3, 1), (3, 2), (3, 4), (4, 1), (4, 2), (4, 3)] Combination (order does NOT matter): print list(itertools.combinations('123', 2)) ...


115

Starting with Python 2.6 (and if you're on Python 3) you have a standard-library tool for this: itertools.permutations. If you're using an older Python (<2.6) for some reason or are just curious to know how it works, here's one nice approach, taken from http://code.activestate.com/recipes/252178/: def all_perms(elements): if len(elements) <=1: ...


68

For versions prior to 2.5, there's the trick: [expression] and [on_true] or [on_false] It can give wrong results when on_true has a false boolean value.1 Although it does have the benefit of evaluating expressions left to right, which is clearer in my opinion. 1. Is there an equivalent of C’s ”?:” ternary operator?


50

I would second the notion that you may wish to consider a subclass instead of the approach you've outlined. However, not knowing your specific scenario, YMMV :-) What you're thinking of is a metaclass. The __new__ function in a metaclass is passed the full proposed definition of the class, which it can then rewrite before the class is created. You can, at ...


34

You can use the types module: >>> import types >>> var = 1 >>> NumberTypes = (types.IntType, types.LongType, types.FloatType, types.ComplexType) >>> isinstance(var, NumberTypes) True Note the use of a tuple to test against multiple types. Under the hood, IntType is just an alias for int, etc.: >>> ...


33

From the documentation: Conditional expressions (sometimes called a “ternary operator”) have the lowest priority of all Python operations. The expression x if C else y first evaluates the condition, C (not x); if C is true, x is evaluated and its value is returned; otherwise, y is evaluated and its value is returned. See PEP 308 for more ...


33

int is immutable so you can't modify it after they are created, use __new__ instead class TestClass(int): def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs): return super(TestClass, cls).__new__(cls, 5) print TestClass()


31

You can use a trailing comma to avoid a newline being printed: print "this should be", print "on the same line" You don't need this to simply print a variable, though: print "Nope, that is not a two. That is a", x Note: From Python 3.x and above print("Nope, that is not a two. That is a", x)


30

Here are some things you can do at least: import module print dir(module) # Find functions of interest. # For each function of interest: help(module.interesting_function) print module.interesting_function.func_defaults


29

Change your code to this and I think it'll explain things (presumably super is looking at where, say, B is in the __mro__?): class A(object): def __init__(self): print "A init" print self.__class__.__mro__ class B(A): def __init__(self): print "B init" print self.__class__.__mro__ super(B, self).__init__() ...


28

__main__.__file__ doesn't exist in the interactive interpreter: import __main__ as main print hasattr(main, '__file__') This also goes for code run via python -c, but not python -m.


26

expression1 if condition else expression2 >>> a = 1 >>> b = 2 >>> 1 if a > b else -1 -1 >>> 1 if a > b else -1 if a < b else 0 -1


22

Adapted version of the script is: #!/usr/bin/env python from __future__ import with_statement from contextlib import closing from zipfile import ZipFile, ZIP_DEFLATED import os def zipdir(basedir, archivename): assert os.path.isdir(basedir) with closing(ZipFile(archivename, "w", ZIP_DEFLATED)) as z: for root, dirs, files in ...


22

In Python 2.x just put a , at the end of your print statement. If you want to avoid the blank space that print puts between items, use sys.stdout.write. import sys sys.stdout.write('hi there') sys.stdout.write('Bob here.') yields: hi thereBob here. Note that there is no newline or blank space between the two strings. In Python 3.x, with its print() ...


19

Use osx$ port select --list python to list your available Python installations. Then use the "--set" option to "port select" to set the port you wish to use. osx$ sudo port select --set python python27


18

On python 2.7 you might use: shutil.make_archive(base_name, format[, root_dir[, base_dir[, verbose[, dry_run[, owner[, group[, logger]]]]]]]). base_name archive name minus extension format format of the archive root_dit directory to compress. For example shutil.make_archive(target_file, format="bztar", root_dir=compress_me)


15

def permutations(head, tail=''): if len(head) == 0: print tail else: for i in range(len(head)): permutations(head[0:i] + head[i+1:], tail+head[i]) called as: permutations('abc')


15

Grab the openssl and libgw32c packages from the gnuwin32 project (download the "Developer files"!) and extract them where you installed gnuwin32 - or if you don't have gnuwin32 tools yet, you can extract it anywhere (e.g. "C:\Program Files\gnuwin32"). Enter the gnuwin32 directory in the "setup.py" file (replace "C:\Utils\GnuWin32" in line 154). Then you can ...


14

sys.ps1 and sys.ps2 are only defined in interactive mode.


14

@up: Unfortunately, the (falseValue, trueValue)[test] solution doesn't have short-circuit behaviour; thus both falseValue and trueValue are evaluated regardless of the condition. This could be suboptimal or even buggy (i.e. both trueValue and falseValue could be methods and have side-effects). One solution to this would be (falseValue, ...


14

This has been fixed since python 2.5, and is clearly noted in the documentation In other words, your book is incorrect / out of date


14

For Python 2.5 and newer there is a specific syntax: [on_true] if [cond] else [on_false] In older Pythons a ternary operator is not implemented but it's possible to simulate it. cond and on_true or on_false Though, there is a potential problem, which if cond evaluates to True and on_true evaluates to False then on_false is returned instead of on_true. ...


13

I have provided a bunch of links below, that answer your question in more detail and more precisely than I can ever hope to. I will however give an answer to your question in my own words as well, to save you some time. I'll put it in points - super is a builtin function, not an attribute. Every type (class) in Python has an __mro__ attribute, that stores ...


12

Here is a snippet of code that allows to access errno: from ctypes import * libc = CDLL("libc.so.6") get_errno_loc = libc.__errno_location get_errno_loc.restype = POINTER(c_int) def errcheck(ret, func, args): if ret == -1: e = get_errno_loc()[0] raise OSError(e) return ret copen = libc.open copen.errcheck = errcheck print ...


12

This solution implements a generator, to avoid holding all the permutations on memory: def permutations (orig_list): if not isinstance(orig_list, list): orig_list = list(orig_list) yield orig_list if len(orig_list) == 1: return for n in sorted(orig_list): new_list = orig_list[:] pos = new_list.index(n) ...



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