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0

I find the following way cleaner than the accepted answer: print m.stderr (Thanks remosu!)


1

This sort of matches the method you describe using set/bag >>> from collections import Counter >>> list_of_friends = ['bill','bill','mark','jenna','brad','mark'] >>> S = set(list_of_friends) >>> bag = Counter(list_of_friends) >>> S.difference(bag - Counter(S)) set(['brad', 'jenna'])


0

Just to add to the potpourri of answers, here's one using itertools.groupby(). This is kind of the same as the Counter m\ethod, but probably less efficient. >>> import itertools >>> list_of_friends = ['bill','bill','mark','jenna','brad','mark'] >>> [k for k,v in itertools.groupby(sorted(list_of_friends)) if len(list(v)) == 1] ...


0

App Engine requests require a response within 60 seconds, else they give a DeadlineExceeded error. If instead, you send the request via the taskqueue, it will wait up to 10 minutes for the response. Taskqueues are used to hit a url The url handler should run the script. So, from one request, you send the taskqueue to another url, via the taskqueue: ...


0

This is hideous and far too clever but it works: list_of_friends = ['bill', 'bill', 'mark', 'jenna', 'brad', 'mark'] set_of_friends = set(list_of_friends) [list_of_friends.remove(friend) for friend in set_of_friends] real_friends = [friend for friend in set_of_friends if friend not in list_of_friends] print(real_friends) # ['brad', 'jenna']


0

Or you can just use recursion: In [83]: def retUn(x): ....: if not x: return [] ....: if x[0] in x[1:]: return retUn( filter(lambda m: m != x[0], x) ) ....: else: return [ x[0] ] + retUn( x[1:] ) ....: In [84]: retUn(x) Out[84]: ['jenna', 'brad']


1

if for some reason you can't use a Counter (ugh why?) list_of_friends = ['bill','bill','mark','jenna','brad','mark'] a_set = set() b_set = set() for friend in list_of_friends: if friend not in a_set: a_set.add(friend) else: b_set.add(friend) result = a_set - b_set


1

Try this: list_of_friends = ['bill','bill','mark','jenna','brad','mark'] unique_list_of_friends = [i for i in list_of_friends if list_of_friends.count(i) == 1] print(unique_list_of_friends)


5

>>> from collections import Counter >>> list_of_friends = ['bill','bill','mark','jenna','brad','mark'] >>> [k for k, v in Counter(list_of_friends).items() if v == 1] ['brad', 'jenna'] >>>


3

You could use a Counter: >>> from collections import Counter >>> c = Counter(['bill','bill','mark','jenna','brad','mark']) >>> [k for k in c.keys() if c[k] == 1] ['brad', 'jenna']


1

1) Does it need to be \u-escaped? Will \x work? If so, try the unicode_escape codec. Otherwise, you can convert using the function below: def four_digit_escape(string): return u''.join(char if 32 <= ord(char) <= 126 else u'\\u%04x'%ord(char) for char in string) symbol = u"hello ¥" print symbol.encode('unicode_escape') print ...


0

Length of accomodator is zero. It will give out of index error. Try this: accomodator=[]*len(textList) #print str(len(accomodator)) + " "+str(len(textList)) i = 0; while i<len(textList): accomodator.append([]) i +=1 After creating accomodator, increase its length. Or if you know some efficient to increase its length, you can use it.


2

Your problem is this line: accomodator=[]*len(textList) Because an empty list multiplied by any number is an empty list: >>> [] * 10 [] You can initialize each element with some default value: >>> [None] * 10 [None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None] So the fix for your code is: accomodator=[None]*len(textList) ...


0

The most reliable way I found to do this in python is to first decode it into unicode, get the ord of the unicode character and plug that into a format string. It looks like this: "\\u%04x" % ord("¥".decode("utf-8")) There is also a method unichr that is supposed to output something like this, but on my system it displays a different encoding than what ...


4

It's a windows specific problem: try "python back.py examplearg" and it will work. Solution (besides not running Windows!) is to update your registry. http://eli.thegreenplace.net/2010/12/14/problem-passing-arguments-to-python-scripts-on-windows/ Set these keys = value HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Applications\python26.exe\shell\open\command = ...


0

I accomplished this by doing the following. Full process yum update -y yum -y groupinstall "Development Tools" installed git ... followed this (http://stackoverflow.com/a/8327476/888640) Installed alternate version of PYTHON wget http://www.python.org/ftp/python/2.7.2/Python-2.7.2.tgz tar -xvzf Python-2.7.2.tgz cd Python-2.7.2 ./configure make altinstall ...


2

This can be done directly from matplotlib import pyplot as plt import numpy as np # set up figure fig, ax = plt.subplots() # make synthetic data x = np.linspace(0, 1, 15) y = np.random.rand(15) yerr = np.ones_like(x) * .2 # if you are using 1.3.1 or older you might need to use uplims to work # around a bug, see below ax.errorbar(x, y, yerr=yerr, ...


1

The most often used solution is to write some "magic" string at the beginning of the encrypted file followed by the encrypted content. If that string is found when reading the file, further encryption is refused. For decription it is read to veryfiy that this is a file we encrypted, but otherwise it is ignored.


0

Unless you have some kind of magical header that can be detected (for example, on Linux, LUKS encrypted disk image has a header block for added features, but DM-Crypt does not) it would be difficult to detect whether the input string is encrypted or not. See: determine if the bits are encrypted?


0

This: if "listen" or "radio" in choice: should be: if "listen" in choice.lower() or "radio" in choice.lower(): Etc.


1

Use a non-capturing group ((?:…)) like this: '<a href="(.+?)"</a><img src="(.+?)" alt="(?:.+?)"><b>(.+?)</b>' Or just get rid of the group entirely: '<a href="(.+?)"</a><img src="(.+?)" alt=".+?"><b>(.+?)</b>' I should also point out that using regular expressions to parse arbitrary HTML is a pretty ...


2

You need to use source $(which virtualenvwrapper.sh) && <your command> with shell=True. Example: >>> from __future__ import print_function >>> from subprocess import Popen, PIPE >>> p = Popen("source $(which virtualenvwrapper.sh) && lsvirtualenv", shell=True, stdout=PIPE) >>> print(p.stdout.read()) ...


-1

You can pass it to eval(): Just do: <!-- language: python --> strTup = '(5,6)' eval(strTup)


2

The other approaches presented are great. I'm going for the hackiest award today: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt fig, ax = plt.subplots() simbh = np.array([5.3, 5.3, 5.5, 5.6, 5.6, 5.8, 5.9, 6.0, 6.2, 6.3, 6.3]) simstel = np.array([10.02, 10.08, 9.64, 9.53, 9.78, 9.65, 10.05, 10.09, 10.08, 10.22, 10.42]) sca2 = ...


3

The widgets in the window frame are defined as part of the window's style: CLOSE_BOX, MINIMIZE_BOX, and MAXIMIZE_BOX. So, when you create the window, just leave those styles out. If you're using a wx.Frame subclass, note that DEFAULT_FRAME_STYLE includes these values, so you will have to mask them out: style = wx.DEFAULT_FRAME_STYLE & (~wx.CLOSE_BOX) ...


3

This is bit hacky, adjust arrow_offset and arrow_size until the figure looks right. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt fig = plt.figure() a1 = fig.add_subplot(111) simbh = np.array([5.3, 5.3, 5.5, 5.6, 5.6, 5.8, 5.9, 6.0, 6.2, 6.3, 6.3]) simstel =np.array([10.02, 10.08, 9.64, 9.53, 9.78, 9.65, 10.05, 10.09, 10.08, 10.22, 10.42]) ...


2

This is not super elegant, but it does the trick to get the arrows start at the data point and go up 0.2 units: for x,y in zip(simstel,simbh): plt.arrow(x,y,0,0.2)


0

It's a few months late, but might be useful. I was working on a Windows computer and had installed the drivers that came with the device, I tried the same code as your question with an Ezcap from Somagic and got the same error. Since "frame is None," I decided to try an if statement around it - in case it was an initialization error. Placing into the loop: ...


1

Let me summarize all the answers and add some more. To write to a file from within your script, user file I/O tools that are provided by Python (this is the f=open('file.txt', 'w') stuff. If don't want to modify your program, you can use stream redirection (both on windows and on Unix-like systems). This is the python myscript > output.txt stuff. If you ...


1

abarnert's answer is very good and pythonic. Another completely different route (not in python) is to let bash do this for you: $ python myscript.py > myoutput.txt This works in general to put all the output of a cli program (python, perl, php, java, binary, or whatever) into a file, see How to save entire output of bash script to file for more.


0

f = open('file.txt', 'w') #open the file(this will not only open the file also #if you had one will create a new one on top or it would create one if you #didn't have one f.write(info_to_write_into_the_file) #this will put the info in the file f.close() #this will close the file handler. AKA free the used memory I hope this helps


2

You would probably want this. Simplest solution would be Create file first. open file via f = open('<filename>', 'w') or f = open('<filename>', 'a') in case you want to append to file Now, write to the same file via f.write(<text to be written>) Close the file after you are done using it #good pracitice f.close()


3

What you're asking for isn't impossible, but it's probably not what you actually want. Instead of trying to save the screen output to a file, just write the output to a file instead of to the screen. Like this: with open('outfile.txt', 'w') as outfile: print >>outfile, 'Data collected on:', input['header']['timestamp'].date() Just add that ...


1

You can use the atexit and signal modules to register calls back that will explicitly kill the process when your program exits normally or receives SIGTERM, respectively: import sys import time import atexit import signal import subprocess from functools import partial from os.path import join, dirname, realpath pc_tunnel_command = '-ssh -batch -pw xxxx -N ...


2

Will concat with inner option handle the case for you, if your dataframes are already matched? In [46]: print pd.concat((df1, df2), join='inner', axis=1)[[0,1,2,-1]] A B C D 0 w 1 1 1/1/14 1 b 1 2 1/3/14 2 c 3 1 1/7/14 3 c 3 1 1/7/14 [[0,1,2,-1]] is to avoid the duplicating A, B and C columns Anyway, this may be a better and ...


0

os.system does not return until the child process exits. The same is true for subprocess.call. That's why your thread is sitting there, waiting for plink to finish. You can probably use subprocess.Popen to launch the process asynchronously and then exit. In any case, the additional thread you are creating is unnecessary.


1

The problem with your algorithm is that you only explore a single path through the triangle: At each "junction", you always select the higher value and proceed down that path. But this "greedy" algorithm does not always work. Consider this example: 1 Yours: (1) Best: (1) 1 2 1 (2) (1) 2 9 1 ...


1

You have a greedy algorithm, which appends the largest adjacent number at every iteration. It produces a suboptimal solution. Simple explanation - consider just a triangle that consists of three top rows. Your solution will be 75 + 95 + 47 = 217. While the optimal solution in this case is 75 + 64 + 82 = 221. How to solve this? I would recommend designing a ...


0

If two threads print at the same time, it's possible for one thread to start printing before another one finishes. This may cause two messages to appear on one line, or for two newlines in a row to be printed with no content. You can prevent threads from accessing some resource at the same time using a Lock object. In your example, you would want to ...


0

I think you'd better to install with compiling python 2.7.8 in your home directory. That's definitely clear for the others. 'update-alternatives' command makes system default python version change. In my case, I made hidden directory '.opt' on my account. Then downloaded and extracted source code from python.org ...


0

Since playerChoice is a variable and not a reference to a function call, you will not need parentheses to use playerChoice. If you use playerChoice(), interpreter will try to invoke a method, and will get failed because playerChoice is not referring to a function call. Thing here to understand is that str(raw_input("What do you do this turn? ")) returns a ...


1

When you use shell=True on UNIX, you should provide your arguments as a string. When you provide a list, subprocess interprets the first item in the list as your entire command string, and the rest of the items in the list as arguments passed to the shell itself, rather than your command. So in your example above, you're ending up with something like this: ...


1

It is because it is searching for the key including 'a' which is not defined on your query.


8

%(a)s retrieves the value for the existing a key from x. %('a')s attempts to get the value for non-existent 'a' key (with quotes) and that causes the error to appear. Simple code example: >>> x = {"'a'": 'a within quotes', 'a': 'no quotes'} >>> "%('a')s" % x 'a within quotes' >>> "%(a)s" % x 'no quotes'


1

A directory isn't a file, it contains files; it's basically a folder. "Changing into a directory" in a shell/Linux environment is analogous to "opening a folder" in a Windows environment. You're just entering a folder/directory so you can look at or execute its contents. You can enter a directory by saying cd directoryname. EDIT: technically a directory is ...


2

First, you need to download the ChromeDriver, then either put the path to the executeable to the PATH environment variable, or pass the path in the executable_path argument: from selenium import webdriver driver = webdriver.Chrome(executable_path='/path/to/executeable/chrome/driver') In order to load extensions, you would need to set ChromeOptions: from ...


2

The problem is here: data = file.read().replace('\n', '') file.read() returns the whole file as one big string. You could get a list of lines out of this by applying .split('\n'), but that's more work than needed. The more standard way to read a file as a list of lines and strip off newlines is: def slurpWorkerCode(filename): with open(filename, ...


0

This seems to do it: sessions_in = ",".join(map(lambda x: "'{0}'".format(x), sessions)) cur.execute(""" SELECT * FROM logs WHERE logs.session IN ( {0} ) """.format(sessions_in))


1

read() returns a single string, so data (and thus ecma) are single strings. When you iterate over a single string, you get one character at a time. I suspect what you really want is data = file.readlines() so that data (and thus ecma) is a list of strings, one string per line.


0

I spent several hours trying to solve your problem for my own edification, using threading, and several unresponsive UIs later ended up with this: TkInter is not thread safe, from tkinter tkMessageBox not working in thread.



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