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8

They both work the same, but Python 2.7 and up will round floating point numbers when printing their representations, in order to not confuse users by the (language- and machine-independent) limitations of floating point arithmetic. The decimal number 0.0026 can't be represented exactly as a binary float, so there will always be some rounding error. If you ...


6

remove eval and your code is correct: mark = raw_input("What is your mark?") try: int(mark) except ValueError: try: float(mark) except ValueError: print "This is not a number" Just checking for a float will work fine: try: float(mark) except ValueError: print "This is not a number"


4

I'd not use __cmp__ and stick to using __eq__ instead. For hashing that is enough and you don't want to extend to being sortable here. Moreover, __cmp__ has been removed from Python 3 in favour of the rich comparison methods (__eq__, __lt__, __gt__, etc.). Next, your __eq__ should return True when the member tuples are equal: def __eq__(self, other): ...


4

The functools.wraps() version in Python 3 can handle function objects with some of the attributes it copies across missing; the one in Python 2 cannot. This is was because issue #3445 was fixed only for Python 3; the methods of dict are defined in C code and have no __module__ attribute. Omitting the @wraps(f) decorator makes everything work in Python 2 ...


4

The easiest way is to not care about the list being created by just using dict.items(): foo = [key for key, value in some_dict.items() if value['marked']] The next option is to use an exception handler: try: # Python 2 iter_some_dict = some_dict.iteritems except AttributeError: # Python 3 iter_some_dict = some_dict.items foo = [key for ...


3

You can simply use dict.items() in both Python 2 and 3, foo = [key for key, value in some_dict.items() if value['marked']] Or you can simply roll your own version of items generator, like this def get_items(dict_object): for key in dict_object: yield key, dict_object[key] And then use it like this for key, value in get_items({1: 2, 3: 4}): ...


2

argparse is included with Python from version 2.7 onwards. You can install it from PyPI for earlier versions of Python, Python 2.3 and up is supported.


2

What you most likely need is the DictReader (as bruno pointed out. He pulled the trigger faster.). It takes the file name and returns each row as a dictionary, which is want you want. This would make your code: import csv a = [] reader = csv.DictReader(open("so.csv",'rU'), dialect=csv.excel_tab, delimiter=',') print reader for row in reader: print row ...


2

[x for [x, y] in cache] This will create a temporary list ['a', 'c'] which you use to check whether val is contained in it. The list however is never kept around, so you can’t really access it. Since this is Python 2, the variables from within the list comprehension (x and y) actually leak out of the expression, so they are still around afterwards. But as ...


2

The problem is the the expression [x for [x,y] in cache] is valued as ['a','c'] before you look for a in it. and therefore, a is not related to b in it. y contains the value of d because it the last value the was stored in y while iterating over cache I think what you want is something like this: cache = [['a', 'b'], ['c', 'd']] val = 'a' ys = [y for ...


2

What? range returns a static list at runtime. xrange returns a generator object from which values are generated as and when required. When to use which? Use xrange if you want to generate a list for a gigantic range, say 1 billion, especially when you have a "memory sensitive system" like a cell phone. Use range if you want to iterate over the list ...


2

Qualified names for classes were introduced in Python 3.3 (see PEP 3155) and AFAIK there's no non-hacky way to do this on Python 2.


2

In order to allow me to get the name of a class I introduced the following functions to introduce the PEP 3155 attribute __qualname__: def fixup_module_class_names(modname=__name__): """ Fixes the class types of the given module to have an attribute __qualname__ as stipulated by PEP 3155. """ def fixup_classtype_members(obj, ...


2

You must be using Python 2.x. Since you have Unicode data in the string, you need to make it a Unicode string literal: >>> import json >>> data = { ... 'name': 'david', ... 'avatar': ...


1

So you try to encode a picture in json. If you want to display it on a web page, consider using a data-url-encoding: image = "data:image/jpg;base64,%s" % ''.join(open('file.jpg').read().encode('base64').split()) data = { 'name': 'david', 'avatar': image, } json_data = json.dumps(data) or if you only need the binary data, simply use: image = ...


1

try this one: #!/usr/bin/env python


1

This should work for the list comprehension. [y for x,y in cache if x == val]


1

In Python 2 input() will eval the string and in this case it will create a tuple, and as tuples are immutable you'll get that error. >>> eval('1, 2, 3') (1, 2, 3) It is safer to use raw_input with a list-comprehension here: inp = raw_input("Please input a series of numbers, divided by a comma:") actual_list = [int(x) for x in inp.split(',')] ...


1

The issue here is that the count in the inner function is bound by an (augmented) assignment statement, and is therefore regarded as local to xyz_inner(). Consequently, the first time the code attempts to execute count += 1 the (local) variable count has not previously been assigned, and so it is indeed an unbound local. Use of nonlocal count inside ...


1

I think you can use the response used in Detecting when a python script is being run interactively in ipython, ie in you pythonrc file, detect if the variable __IPYTHON__ exists: def in_ipython(): try: __IPYTHON__ except NameError: return False else: return True


1

You are extending K with a single element from l: K += max(l, key=lambda x: x[0]) where l contains tuples. Note that I said extending, not appending; the elements contained in that one maximum tuple are added, not the tuple itself: >>> K = [] >>> K += (0, 0) >>> K [0, 0] As such you end up with single integers in K, which you ...



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