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73

2305843009213693951 is 2^61 - 1. It's the largest Mersenne prime that fits into 64 bits. If you have to make a hash just by taking the value mod some number, then a large Mersenne prime is a good choice -- it's easy to compute and ensures an even distribution of possibilities. (Although I personally would never make a hash this way) It's especially ...


59

Based on python documentation in pyhash.c file: For numeric types, the hash of a number x is based on the reduction of x modulo the prime P = 2**_PyHASH_BITS - 1. It's designed so that hash(x) == hash(y) whenever x and y are numerically equal, even if x and y have different types. So for a 64/32 bit machine, the reduction would be 2 ...


11

You could check whether args are truthy in your function: def g(*args): if not args: args = (1, 2, 3) return "I received {}!".format(', '.join(str(arg) for arg in args)) If no args are passed to the function, it will result in a empty tuple, which evaluates to False.


10

The generator actually retains the actual call frames when yield happens. It doesn't really affect performance whether you have 1 or 100 local variables. The performance difference really comes from how Python (here I am using the CPython a.k.a. the one that you'd download from http://www.python.com/, or have on your operating system as /usr/bin/python, but ...


9

The function annotations there are annotations, nothing more. They're documentation about intended usage. Like it says in PEP 3107, the mechanism provides a single, standard way to specify function parameters and return values, replacing a variety of ad-hoc tools and libraries. But as it goes on to say: Function annotations are nothing more than a way ...


9

You first joined all strings together into one big string, and then converted that string to a list, which always results in all the individual characters being pulled out as elements: >>> list(map(lambda x: str(x * 5), range(1, 4))) ['5', '10', '15'] >>> ''.join(map(lambda x: str(x * 5), range(1, 4))) '51015' >>> list(''.join(map(...


7

Just convert the numbers to strings before joining: var = [1, 2, 3] print(", ".join(map(str, var))) or using a list comprehension: print(", ".join([str(x) for x in var]))


7

You're not actually timing the computation with ** and %, because the result gets constant-folded by the bytecode compiler. Avoid that: timeit.timeit('(a**b) % c', setup='a=65537; b=767587; c=14971787') and the pow version will win hands down.


7

If you read a little further down the documentation it mentions that (emphasis mine): PEP 492 was accepted in CPython 3.5.0 with __aiter__ defined as a method, that was expected to return an awaitable resolving to an asynchronous iterator. In 3.5.2 (as PEP 492 was accepted on a provisional basis) the __aiter__ protocol was updated to return ...


6

If no arguments are received, args will be an empty tuple. You can't add a default value in the method signature itself, but you can check if args is empty and replace it with a fallback value inside the function. def g(*args): if not args: args = (1, 2, 3) return 'I received {}!'.format(', '.join(str(arg) for arg in args))


6

Hash function returns plain int that means that returned value is greater than -sys.maxint and lower than sys.maxint, which means if you pass sys.maxint + x to it it will return -sys.maxint + (x - 2). hash(sys.maxint + 1) == sys.maxint + 1 # False hash(sys.maxint + 1) == - sys.maxint -1 # True hash(sys.maxint + sys.maxint) == -sys.maxint + sys.maxint - 2 # ...


6

The only state that a generator needs to save is a reference to the stack frame, so saving and restoring state takes exactly the same time no matter how much state is involved and wherever you put the data. The difference you see in the timings is purely down to the speed with which Python can access values: a local variable access is very fast, a global ...


6

If your ultimate goal is simply detecting if there's a double, this function may help: def has_doubles(n): return len(set(str(n))) < len(str(n))


6

Yes, in a nutshell, modules do implicitly return None in order for the big evaluation loop inside ceval.c to be able detect when to the current frame is finished and terminate. Interestingly, you can see this even when a python file that is completely empty is interpreted, from a terminal: jim@lpt> touch file.py jim@lpt> python -m dis file.py 1 ...


6

statistics isn't part of NumPy. It's a Python standard library module with a rather different design philosophy; it goes for accuracy at all costs, even for unusual input datatypes and extremely poorly-conditioned input. Performing a sum the way the statistics module does it is really expensive, more so than performing a sort. If you want an efficient mean ...


5

You can write file in python like with open("out.txt", "w") as f: f.write("OUTPUT") Or you can use io redirection to redirect output to a file $ python code.py > out.txt https://docs.python.org/3/tutorial/inputoutput.html#methods-of-file-objects https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redirection_(computing)


5

You can easily test this out yourself, by definining a decorator that will tell you whether you decorated something. For example this one: def myDecorator (f): print('Decorated {0}'.format(f.__name__)) return f Then, when used with your class: class MyClass: @myDecorator def f1 (self): return 1 def f2 (self): return 2 ...


5

In this case I would use a spigot algorithm, which allows to calculate the n-th digit of pi with limited amount of memory, and not increasing with the index of the digit; in particular, the Bailey–Borwein–Plouffe variant. This link is most probably what you are looking for, if I understand correctly your question: The formula can directly calculate the ...


5

reverse reverses the list in-place, see the manual, while [::-1] gives a new list in reversed order. Try print(p) after calling p.reverse(), you'll see the difference.


5

Couple things here.. This isn't necessarily wrong (the code will still work) but there's no reason to convert input to a str, it already is a string Strings need to be in quotes, not inside str(). Use "Red" instead Maybe use better variable names, x is unclear The last exit is useless Your code fixed would look something like: selected_color = input("...


5

This feels like a situation where any would be the best solution: # Function to check if a given DateZoneCity def DateZoneCity_downloaded_previously(Order_Date, ZoneCity): # Combination had already been completely downloaded string_to_match = Order_Date.strftime('%Y/%m/%d') + "-" + ZoneCity[0] + "...


5

The .strptime() method supports the day of year format: >>> import datetime >>> >>> datetime.datetime.strptime('16234', '%y%j').date() datetime.date(2016, 8, 21) And then you can use strftime() to reformat the date >>> date = datetime.date(2016, 8, 21) >>> date.strftime('%d/%m/%Y') '21/08/2016'


5

You have two options: Checking if the key exists sum(dct[k] for k in lst if k in dct) or using get sum(dct.get(k, 0) for k in lst) where dct.get(k, 0) returns dct[k] if k is a key in dct or 0 if not.


5

You can simplify it a bit: if sys.version_info[0] == 3: xrange = range I would do it the other way around: if sys.version_info[0] == 2: range = xrange If you ever want to drop Python 2.x support, you can just remove those two lines without going through all your code. However, I strongly suggest considering the six library. It is the de-facto ...


5

In your line: monthly_payment = float(loan_amount) * [0.05 * (1.0 + 0.05) * float(num_of_payments)] / [(1.0 + 0.05) * float(num_of_payments) - 1.0] You are using square brackets (in this case used to create a list) as a means of specifying order of operations. This should be () type brackets.


5

Your code is doing 5.4 billion calculations due to the two for loops (0.15 mil * 36k): I would do something like this: (Thanks to @Leon for helping me make this answer better) from bisect import bisect_left, bisect_right zeros_list = sorted([zeros2.iloc[j,1] for j in zeros2.index]) zeros2_length = len(zeros2_list) for i in ones2.index: cur_disc = ...


5

Classes within classes work just fine in python -- However, python's primary mechanism for handling namespaces is modules and packages, not classes. I've not found a whole lot of use for classes within classes (though there probably are some valid use-cases). To set up something like os.path.exists, I would direct you to the source except that os.path does ...


5

To easily replace a substring in a string txtwith another: txt = txt.replace('\\', '/') #Replacing \\ with / Remember kids, python has a built in function for everything


5

raise and del are definitely distinct from functions, each for different reasons: raise exits the current flow of execution; the normal flow of byte-code interpretation is interrupted and the stack is unwound until the next exception handler is found. Functions can't do this, they create a new stack frame instead. del can't be a function, because you must ...


5

The key is int(price). The input command returns a string which is stored in the variable price. In the second line, price is converted to a number by the call int(price), but that result is not stored anywhere. It is used for the comparison and then discarded. So when you go to multiply in the third line, you're trying to multiply a number times a string.



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