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19

It simply clears the local reference to self, making sure that if an exception occurs the reference passed to self._loop.call_exception_handler() is the only remaining reference and no cycle has been created. This is still needed here because the local namespace is referenced by the exception traceback; it will not be cleared up when the function exits as ...


10

The real answer is that Guido likes the fact that asynchronous yield points are explicit in coroutines, because if you don't realize that a call can yield, then that's an invitation to concurrency problems -- like with threads. But if you have to write an explicit yield from, it's fairly easy to make sure it doesn't land in the middle of two critical ...


9

I temporarily solved the problem using a decorator inspired by Tornado's gen_test: def async_test(f): def wrapper(*args, **kwargs): coro = asyncio.coroutine(f) future = coro(*args, **kwargs) loop = asyncio.get_event_loop() loop.run_until_complete(future) return wrapper Like J.F. Sebastian suggested, this decorator ...


9

Note that the possible uses of yield from are a small part of the asynch PEP, and never need to be used. Maybe Guido oversold them in his talk ;-) As to why functions aren't being changed to always be async by default, that's just realism. Asynch gimmicks bring new overheads and semantic complications, and Python isn't going to slow down and complicate ...


5

First, you're getting AssertionError: There is no current event loop in thread 'Thread-1'. because asyncio requires each thread in your program to have its own event loop, but it will only automatically create an event loop for you in the main thread. So if you call asyncio.get_event_loop once in the main thread it will automatically create a loop objecet ...


5

Yes, exactly. Tasks are you friends: import asyncio, random q = asyncio.Queue() @asyncio.coroutine def produce(): while True: yield from q.put(random.random()) yield from asyncio.sleep(0.5 + random.random()) @asyncio.coroutine def consume(): while True: value = yield from q.get() print("Consumed", value) ...


5

Here is a simple proxy which allow you to wget 127.0.0.1:8888 and get a html response from google: import asyncio class Client(asyncio.Protocol): def connection_made(self, transport): self.connected = True # save the transport self.transport = transport def data_received(self, data): # forward data to the server ...


4

async_test, suggested by Marvin Killing, definitely can help -- as well as direct calling loop.run_until_complete() But I also strongly recommend to recreate new event loop for every test and directly pass loop to API calls (at least asyncio itself accepts loop keyword-only parameter for every call that need it). Like class Test(unittest.TestCase): ...


4

Because low_level is a coroutine, it can only be used by running an asyncio event loop. If you want to be able to call it from synchronous code that isn't running an event loop, you have to provide a wrapper that actually launches an event loop and runs the coroutine until completion: def sync_low_level(): loop = asyncio.get_event_loop() ...


4

The first example, using yield from, actually blocks each instance call_self until the recursive call to call_self returns. This means the call stack keeps growing until you run out of stack space. As you mentioned, this is the obvious behavior. The second example, using asyncio.async, doesn't block anywhere. So, each instance of call_self immediately exits ...


3

A write to a TCP socket does not guarantee that the data get received. It only sends the data to the OS kernel which then will try as hard as possible to send the data to the other side. But, the write call will already return success once the data are sent to the OS kernel. If the data then get received by the peers OS kernel it will acknowledge them at the ...


3

If you don't have an asynchronous I/O-based imap library, you can just use a concurrent.futures.ThreadPoolExecutor to do the I/O in threads. Python will release the GIL during the I/O, so you'll get true concurrency: def init_connection(d): username = d['usern'] password = d['passw'] connection = imaplib.IMAP4_SSL('imap.bar.de') ...


3

This just isn't how asyncio works. It uses an explicit asynchronous model - if code is going to return control to the event loop, it either has to use yield from, or it has to use callbacks/Futures. If you're inside of a function (like do_something_periodically), you can't return control to the event loop without 1) using yield from 2) exiting the method ...


3

In this case, there is no way to cancel the Future once it has actually started running, because you're relying on the behavior of concurrent.futures.Future, and its docs state the following: cancel() Attempt to cancel the call. If the call is currently being executed and cannot be cancelled then the method will return False, otherwise the call ...


3

The multiprocessing library isn't particularly well-suited for use with asyncio, unfortunately. Depending on how you were planning to use the multiprocessing/multprocessing.Queue, however, you may be able to replace it completely with a concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor: import asyncio from concurrent.futures import ProcessPoolExecutor def ...


3

yield from must be used in a coroutine. As I can see, data_received can't be a coroutine because of some asyncio internals. A solution is to wrap your code in a coroutine and call it using a asyncio.Task(). As an example you can have a look at my experiments


3

You want to use loop.run_in_executor, which uses a concurrent.futures executor, but maps the return value to an asyncio future. The original asyncio PEP suggests that concurrent.futures.Future may someday grow a __iter__ method so it can be used with yield from as well, but for now the library has been designed to only require yield from support and nothing ...


2

You could make an Any class that inherits from Future, and wraps a list of futures. The Any class waits until one of its futures resolves, then gives you the list of results: import time from tornado import gen from tornado.ioloop import IOLoop from tornado.concurrent import Future @gen.coroutine def delayed_msg(seconds, msg): yield ...


2

You need to use the returned values from asyncio.wait(): import asyncio class Error(Exception): pass @asyncio.coroutine def main(): try: done, pending = yield from asyncio.wait([raise_exception()], timeout=1) assert not pending future, = done # unpack a set of length one print(future.result()) # raise an exception ...


2

Regarding #1: Python does no such thing. Note that the fast_sqrt function you've written (i.e. before any decorators) is not a generator function, coroutine function, task, or whatever you want to call it. It's an ordinary function running synchronously and returning what you write after the return statement. Depending on the presence of @coroutine, very ...


2

Here is an implementation of a multiprocessing.Queue object that can be used with asyncio. It provides the entire multiprocessing.Queue interface, with the addition of coro_get and coro_put methods, which are asyncio.coroutines that can be used to asynchronously get/put from/into the queue. The implementation details are essentially the same as the second ...


2

Your current code will work fine for the restaurant that doesn't care about sequential ordering of requests. All ten requests for the menu will run concurrently, and will print to stdout as soon as they're complete. Obviously, this won't work for the restaurant that requires sequential requests. You need to refactor a bit for that to work: ...


2

Aha, I grok you problem. Explicit connector definitely can solve the issue. https://github.com/KeepSafe/aiohttp/pull/79 should fix it for implicit connectors too. Thank you very much for finding resource leak in aiohttp UPD. aiohttp 0.8.2 has no the problem.


2

In asyncio coroutines you should to use yield from and never yield. That's by design. Argument for yield from should be another coroutine or asyncio.Future instance only. Calls of coroutine itself should be used with yield from again like yield from countdown(5). For your case I recommend to use queues: import asyncio @asyncio.coroutine def countdown(n, ...


2

What causes the exception: greet continues to run even after the future.set_result call; By changingwhile True with if True, you will get what I mean. How about using asyncio.Event? import asyncio @asyncio.coroutine def greet(stop): while not stop.is_set(): print('Hello World') yield from asyncio.sleep(1) @asyncio.coroutine def ...


2

You can take a look on, say, https://github.com/KeepSafe/aiohttp/blob/master/examples/mpsrv.py for example of multiprocess server.


2

Two ways to do that. Create a wrapper function, or just use a session to provide the auth. Using a session: @asyncio.coroutine def do_checks(): loop = asyncio.get_event_loop() session = requests.Session() session.auth = HTTPBasicAuth('user', 'pass') req = loop.run_in_executor(None, session.get, 'https://api.github.com/user') resp = ...


2

You can run the event loop inside a background thread: >>> import asyncio >>> >>> @asyncio.coroutine ... def greet_every_two_seconds(): ... while True: ... print('Hello World') ... yield from asyncio.sleep(2) ... >>> def loop_in_thread(loop): ... asyncio.set_event_loop(loop) ... ...


2

Well, there are nicer, platform-specific ways of being notified when a file is created. Gerrat linked to one for Windows in his comment, and pyinotify can be used for Linux. Those platform-specific approaches can probably be plugged into asyncio, but you'd end up writing a whole bunch of code to make it work in a platform independent way, which probably ...


2

This is due to issue 20493: In asyncio, if the next event is in 2^40 seconds, epoll.poll() raises an OverflowError because epoll_wait() maximum value for the timeout is INT_MAX seconds. Guido van Rossum suggested that: For now, can we just add to the asyncio docs that timeouts shouldn't exceed one day? Then we can fix it later without breaking ...



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