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0

I suggest instead of deriving from StreamReader/StreamWriter invite your own class(es) with similar API. Say, I did it for aiozmq library: https://github.com/aio-libs/aiozmq/blob/master/aiozmq/stream.py


5

The issue is that you're trying to yield from the call to self.stream.write(), but stream.write isn't actually a coroutine. When you call yield from on an item, Python internally calls iter(item). In this case, the call to write() is returning None, so Python is trying to do iter(None) - hence the exception you see. To fix it, you should just call write() ...


1

Well, you may try low-level aiohttp.server instead of aiohttp.web. It has no routes, middlewares and other high-level stuff. But you have to work with aiohttp low-level abstractions like message, payload and response.


2

Using asyncio doesn't magically make all your code asynchronous. In this case, requests is blocking, so all your coroutines will wait for it. There is an async library called aiohttp that allows async http requests, although it isn't as user-friendly as requests.


1

Your server is fine as-is for what you're trying to do; your code as written actually keeps the TCP connection alive, it's you just don't have the plumbing in place to continously feed it new messages. To do that, you need to tweak the client code so that you can feed new messages into it whenever you want, rather than only doing it when the connection_made ...


3

https://docs.python.org/3.4/library/asyncio-task.html#asyncio.ensure_future asyncio.ensure_future(coro_or_future, *, loop=None) Schedule the execution of a coroutine object: wrap it in a future. Return a Task object. If the argument is a Future, it is returned directly. New in version 3.4.4. That's about it for "Who is to blame?". And ...


0

well since you are trying to read the value of 'line' right after you call read() you need that value at any cost... if the coroutine wouldn't stop cause there are no data, you could get an AttributeError on the line.decode() call if 'line' then is None. one thing you can do is to set a timeout on the blocking call and handle the timeout exception: ... ...


1

The documentation for asyncio.wait_for specifies that it will cancel the underlying task, and then raise TimeoutError from the wait_for call itself: Returns result of the Future or coroutine. When a timeout occurs, it cancels the task and raises asyncio.TimeoutError. And you are correct that task cancellation can indeed be intercepted: ...


-1

from threading import Thread import shlex def endless_job(): while True: pass job = Thread(target=endless_job) job.start() while True: user_input = input('> ') print(shlex.split(user_input)) shlex module helps you to parse the command line entered by the user :) If you need to pass arguments to the endless_job function, you can ...


1

You should be able to use asyncio since the StdIn is just another stream you can select...


1

I'm still a little confused by what you're trying to do, but there's definitely no need to try to nest event loops - your program is single-threaded, so when you call asyncio.get_event_loop() multiple times, you're always going to get the same event loop back. So you're really not creating two different loops in your example; both fmDaemon.run and Function1 ...


5

When you CTRL+C, the event loop gets stopped, so your calls to t.cancel() don't actually take effect. For the tasks to be cancelled, you need to start the loop back up again. Here's how you can handle it: import asyncio @asyncio.coroutine def shleepy_time(seconds): print("Shleeping for {s} seconds...".format(s=seconds)) yield from ...


0

Unless you are on Windows, set up event-loop based signal handlers for SIGINT (and also SIGTERM so you can run it as a service). In these handlers, you may either exit the event loop immediately, or initiate some kind of cleanup sequence and exit later. Example in official Python documentation: ...


0

You should parse incoming data in data_received() and after reaching hello may call your own callback like hello_received()


0

Having considered this some more, I've come to the conclusion that it is possible to do this, but it's not exactly beautiful. Start with the traditional version of foo(): def foo(file_obj): data = file_obj.read() # Do other things here We need to pass a file object which will behave "correctly" here. When the file object needs to do I/O, it ...


1

You can take a look on tasklocals library. It introduces tasklocals.local like threading.local for multithreading.



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